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News from the Northwest and Beyond
Updated: 1 hour 11 min ago

PNR Weekly Digest: February 23, 2021

Tue, 2021-02-23 10:46

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

Consumer Health Minute: Consumer Health Collection Management
Many who have attended NNLM classes have expressed concern about what resources to include in their library collections, especially print. Print health information resources are a conundrum as health information changes so often and many of the authoritative resources by medical associations or organizations are now only available online. Some of this is explained in the new NNLM on-demand course, “Consumer Health Collection Management”…learn more about this new class and how to attend on the blog post

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account 

NLM’s History of Medicine Division: A Research Collection of Rare Medical Materials: The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) History of Medicine Division has one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of historical material related to health and disease. In this session you will learn how the History of Medicine Division approaches acquisition and conservation; discover hidden treasures in the collection and get to know how to access this vast resource. Most importantly, you will see how such collections remain relevant in a world concerned with data science, health care to diverse groups, and reacting to pandemics. February 24 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

How PubMed® Works: How PubMed Works is a series of four 90-minute classes presented via WebEx.  Register for each class separately. All classes are from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT. Each class is eligible for 1.5 MLA CE credits. The individual classes are:

BLOSSOM! Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness symposium: This free three-day virtual symposium will bring together experts on morale in libraries, invisible services in libraries, vocational awe, burnout, and self-care. The symposium will provide library staff at all levels, including management, with key takeaways to improve library staff’s health and wellness. This event is open to all library staff regardless of employment status and to library science students. This virtual even provides 8 continuing education (CE) credits. March 24 – 26. Learn more and register 

NNLM Reading Club Presents…Resurrection Lily with author Amy Byer Shainman: Please join us as Amy Byer Shainman, also known as the BRCA Responder, talks about her book, Resurrection Lily: The BRCA Gene, Hereditary Cancer & Lifesaving Whispers from the Grandmother I Never Knew with genetic counselor Ellen Matloff. In this powerful program, these two genetic cancer experts will share their story and knowledge and answer your questions. March 11 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Learn more and how to attend this livestream event

Wikipedia + Libraries: NNLM: Gain insight into the value of Wikipedia as a viable reference and build the skills and knowledge needed to evaluate articles on Wikipedia for yourself or your patrons, with a specific focus on health and medical topics, through a four-week, online course. After you register, you will receive a confirmation email that includes more information on how and when you can access the class. March 15 – April 9. (8 MLA CE) Register 

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the Public Library: Join this Library Journal webcast to hear a panel of distinguished public library professionals who are embracing their role as community leaders. The thoughtful discussion will spotlight how these librarians are promoting equity and inclusion and offering support for their diverse communities. They will share their experiences improving services for underserved populations, adopting effective racial literacy plans, and taking concrete action to create inclusive and welcoming library spaces and services to uplift their communities. Session will be recorded and sent to registrants. Thursday, February 25 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register.

Re-Envisioning LIS: Activating Social Justice: Join the Washington State Library First Tuesday’s webinar session with Dr. Nicole Cooke for a discussion based on her article in the Dec 14, 2020 Publishers Weekly “What It Means to Decolonize the Library”. March 2 at 9:00 a.m. PT. Register

*Strategies for Patient and Health Educators to Build Trust and Dispel Myths Around COVID-19 Vaccines: The Cancer Patient Education Network (CPEN) and Health Care Education Association (HCEA) welcome you to participate in this joint webinar. After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List a reputable source for COVID-19 vaccine information.
  • Describe strategies to build trust between patients and health educators.
  • Describe communication strategies to overcome vaccine misinformation

March 2 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Free to CPEN and HCEA members, non-member the fee is $10. Register

Changes are coming to the way you log in to your NCBI account: Learn about changes to NCBI account log ins that will affect those of you who sign in directly your NCBI account.  After June 1, 2021 you will need to log in using your institution, social media, Google, Microsoft or login.gov account username and password. In this webinar, you will learn how to register for a free login.gov account and how to link this to an existing NCBI account. You’ll also see where to find the most up-to-date information and FAQs on this topic. We will answer a few questions from our mail bag on these changes. Questions can be submitted in by February 24th via email to info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  with the subject line “Changes to my NCBI Log In”. March 3 from 9:00 – 9:45 a.m. PT. Register 

Strengthening Communities: Food Access at Your Library: Guidance will be provided on how to start food access initiatives with limited local partnership options, few staff and limited resources in rural, urban and suburban settings. The WebJunction session will also explore how two statewide organizations support local libraries in this work through technical assistance and funding.  March 24 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

Introduction to Health Sciences Librarianship: This Library Juice Academy course is organized in four modules, each based on a scenario from the health sciences. Participants will use assigned readings, suggested resources, and class discussions to complete the scenarios. Runs March 1 – 28th. Provides 1.5 CEUs or 15 PDHs. Cost is $175. Register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“NLM Announces New Annual Lecture on Science, Technology, and Society”, from the NLM Director’s blog

List of Serials Indexed for Online Users, 2021 Available in XML

Cataloging Records in CatfilePlus and Serfile Available for Download in MARCXML Format

NLM Classification 2021 Winter Edition Now Available

Improvements to NCBI Assembly   

Closure of the NNLM DOCLINE Coordination Office (NDCO)

Dr. Teresa Zayas Cabán Named NLM Assistant Director for Policy Development

What It Means to Talk about Race and African American Health

*“Is One Vaccine Dose Enough After COVID-19 Infection?”, from the NIH Director’s blog

*New COVID-19 Studies Dashboard Launches

Intel and Google Cloud Team with All of Us Research Program

To end HIV epidemic, we must address health disparities- Expert report cites unequal progress in Southern U.S. and among marginalized groups

* Study Identifies Risk Factors for Elevated Anxiety in Young Adults During COVID-19 Pandemic

National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparity’s Conversations with Principal Investigators at Research Centers in Minority Institutions

In Search of Equity: Rethinking Race and Racism in Science and Medicine

FYI: 

*COVID-19 Resources

*About COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force
On February 10, 2021, President Biden and Vice President Harris announced 12 individuals to serve as non-federal members of the Biden-Harris COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force. The Task Force members represent a diversity of backgrounds and expertise, a range of racial and ethnic groups, and a number of important populations, including: children and youth; educators and students; health care providers, immigrants; individuals with disabilities; LGBTQ+ individuals; public health experts; rural communities; state, local, territorial, and Tribal governments; and unions. Learn more on the Office of Minority Health website 

*NNLM invites proposals for a virtual symposium
Responding to the COVID-19 Infodemic, on April 8th-9th, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the disparities of underserved, minority, and underrepresented communities. This includes ensuring equal understanding of accurate health information, education in hard hit communities, and valuing inclusion in clinical research to overcome COVID-19. The NNLM Virtual Symposium is an opportunity to engage with NNLM Network Members to address misinformation and mistrust, raise awareness about the pandemic, and efforts to combat it. Learn more and submit an application. The deadline to submit is February 26 at 8:59 p.m. PT.

Libraries, Literacy, and Equity: A Virtual Conversation: Dr. Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress, and Tracie D. Hall, Executive Director of the American Library Association, will join us to discuss the critical role of libraries in promoting literacy and equity in communities across America. February 25 at 8:00 a.m. PT. Register 

*Let’s Talk About Eating Disorders
In recognition of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, NIMH is hosting a livestream discussion featuring NIMH grantee Cynthia Bulik, Ph.D., professor at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine and Founding Director of the UNC Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders. Dr. Bulik will discuss signs, symptoms, treatments, and the latest research on eating disorders. In addition, she will discuss some of the challenges that the COVID-19 outbreak has presented for individuals living with eating disorders and other mental illnesses. February from 9:30 – 10:00 a.m. PT. Learn more about the event and how to participate

American Heart Month 2021
February is American Heart Month, a time when all people can focus on their cardiovascular health. The Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention is shining a light on hypertension (high blood pressure), a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke. As seen in The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Control Hypertension, our partners can take meaningful steps to control hypertension by using key resources and implementing life-saving strategies. To support frontline health care and community partners, the CDC is sharing three toolkits with key hypertension control resources.

Talk. They Hear You. Talking with Your Teen brochures
Check out the new publications from SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) for parents and guardians to help guide teens regarding marijuana, vaping, alcohol, and opioids. All are free to download.

Youth Health Literacy Materials
Wisconsin Health Literacy collaborated with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) to create WISELearn Health Science New Lesson Plans & Resources Session.
Lesson Plan Topics include:

  • Finding Reliable Health Information Online
  • Let’s Talk About Pain Medicines – Opioid Education
  • Let’s Talk About Medicines – General Medicine
  • Health Literacy 101
  • Let’s Talk About Coping

Resource Topics include:

  • Health Insurance
  • Health Equity
  • Diversity/Inclusion
  • Health Communication

Learn more about these materials for your youth programs at the Wisconsin Health Literacy website

Key TRI Resources Now Available in Spanish
The Spanish version of the Toxics Release Inventory website will help Spanish-speaking communities find data about chemical releases and waste management in the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: February 23, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: Consumer Health Collection Management

Thu, 2021-02-18 06:29

Many of you may be familiar with our consumer health classes that we offer for free and are eligible towards obtaining the Medical Library Association’s (MLA) Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS).

Many attendees have expressed concern about what resources to include in their library collections, especially print. Print health information resources are a conundrum as health information changes so often and many of the authoritative resources by medical associations or organizations are now only available online. Some of this is explained in the new NNLM on-demand course, “Consumer Health Collection Management”.

This 4 credit hour on-demand course reviews collection management principles and resources for health-related collections in public libraries.  It includes a video and 2 assignments to complete at your own pace. It is also eligible to put towards earning your CHIS specialization.

The learning objectives for the course include:

  • Assess the quality of their library’s current health information materials and identify any collection gaps
  • Identify quality health information resources online, in print, and other formats when conducting health information reference
  • Select authoritative health information resources, in a variety of formats, for their library’s collection while meeting the needs of their community
  • Explain and provide justification of the library’s health information collection
  • Consider including health related things that can be offered for lending in their library

“Consumer Health Collection Management” works well with another NNLM course, “Introduction to Health Reference: Ethics and Best Practices”. Register for one or both and to learn more about consumer health services for your library.

The post Consumer Health Minute: Consumer Health Collection Management first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: February 16, 2021

Tue, 2021-02-16 10:52

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account.

Serving Library Users with Mental Illness: A Crash Course on Controlling Clashes: This webinar increases your understanding of mental illness, teaches effective methods of communicating with mentally-ill patrons who are creating a disturbance in the library, helps you protect staff and patrons in rare instances of possible violence, and shows you how to locate resources you can lean on when necessary. February 17 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Launching and Leading the Librarian Reserve Corps: Developing an agile librarian network in response to COVID-19: This is a presentation on librarian visioning, leadership, management, and trial by fire. It provides a unique perspective on launching and leading an international network of librarian volunteers in a new role: emergency responders in the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn how Elaine Hicks lead an international team who ushered the Librarian Reserve Corps (LRC) into reality. Nearly a year later, the LRC continues to provide expertise and guidance on a myriad of scholarly communications issues concerning COVID-19 research. Elaine, Stacy Brody, and Sara Loree were awarded Library Journal’s 2021 Librarians of the Year in recognition of their important work. April 21 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register  

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community: This course will provide an overview of ideas to conduct health outreach and create health programs for libraries and community/faith based organizations. Participants will learn how to integrate resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies to introduce community members to NLM resources in fun and engaging ways. February 23 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Taking Science to the Streets: Community Science and Participatory Approaches to Improve Environment, Health, and Quality of Life in Urban Areas: This presentation will describe local community-driven research, advocacy, and public health practice in an environmentally degraded urban community, Northwest Atlanta’s Proctor Creek Watershed. Community residents (watershed researchers), academics, and non-profit organizations leverage local, community knowledge; community science methods; and participatory approaches to identify, document, and analyze the impacts of local environmental hazards and quality of life stressors. March 3 at 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

ClinicalTrials.gov Modernization Webinar: Join ClinicalTrials.gov for an update on the ClinicalTrials.gov modernization effort. The webinar will include information on the modernization efforts, the Request for Information (RFI), and ways to share your feedback. The webinar will be recorded and slides will be made available for those unable to attend. February 18 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Register 

*Dr. Francis Collins on the Coronavirus Vaccines: Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health, will share with us why it is critical that individuals living with chronic diseases and conditions receive the coronavirus vaccine. He will describe the scientific evidence for the safety and efficacy of the vaccine and why it is important to get vaccinated when it is your turn on this Genetic Alliance webinar. February 20 at 9:00 a.m. PT. Register

*National Forum on COVID-19 Vaccine: CDC is organizing a virtual National Forum on COVID-19 Vaccine that will bring together practitioners from national, state, tribal, local, and territorial levels who are engaged in vaccinating communities across the nation. February 22 – 24. Learn more and register 

*Systematizing the One Health Approach in Preparedness and Response Efforts for Infectious Disease Outbreaks: A Virtual Workshop: The National Academies’ Forum on Microbial Threats will host a virtual workshop to examine ways to systemize and integrate the One Health approach as part of outbreak prevention, detection, preparedness, and response efforts. This workshop will explore multi-sector collaboration mechanisms, community engagement strategies, workforce development, and policies that can effectively implement the core capacities and interventions of One Health principles to strengthen national health systems and enhance global health security. February 23 – 25. Register

NIAID Data Science Seminar Series: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) will conduct a series of ideas and innovation webinars that bring together experts and stakeholders in data science, infectious disease, immunology, and immune-mediated disorders. First event: “Harnessing the Power of Data for Immune-Mediated and Infectious Disease Research – An Expert Panel Discussion” February 26th, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. PT. Learn more and register 

NHGRI Short Course in Genomics: The National Human Genome Research Institute’s 2021 Short Course in Genomics is for middle and high school teachers, community college and Tribal College faculty teaching science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses. The course will be virtual and held August 2-6, 2021. Deadline to apply is March 8. Learn more about the program and apply

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“Progress Towards a Modernized ClinicalTrials.gov”, from the NLM Director’s blog

New MEDLINE Website and Policy Updates

NLM Classification Updated, February 12, 2021

Making a World of Difference: Stories About Global Health

*“Mapping Which Coronavirus Variants Will Resist Antibody Treatments”, from the NIH Director’s blog

*COVID-19 Therapeutics Prioritized for Testing in Clinical Trials

20th anniversary of landmark Human Genome Project publications

*NIAID’s cloud-based, secure data platform enables sharing of anonymous patient-level clinical data to help generate new knowledge to treat and prevent infectious diseases such as COVID-19

*Four Potential COVID-19 Therapeutics Enter Phase 2/3 Testing in NIH ACTIV-2 Trial

Join the National Institute on Drug Abuse for National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® (NDAFW) and help share facts about drugs, alcohol, and addiction in your community

*NIH has a new NIH Spanish COVID-19 site featuring information on testing, treatments, vaccines and clinical trials and also highlights NIH COVID-19 resources about addiction, mental health, prevention and more

Request for Information (RFI) on use of Common Data Elements in NIH-funded Research, deadline is May 10

FYI:

*COVID-19 Resources

NNLM invites proposals for a virtual symposium
Responding to the COVID-19 Infodemic, on April 8th-9th, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the disparities of underserved, minority, and underrepresented communities. This includes ensuring equal understanding of accurate health information, education in hard hit communities, and valuing inclusion in clinical research to overcome COVID-19. The NNLM Virtual Symposium is an opportunity to engage with NNLM Network Members to address misinformation and mistrust, raise awareness about the pandemic, and efforts to combat it. Learn more and submit an application. The deadline to submit is February 26 at 8:59 p.m. PT.

NNLM All of Us CEN survey
We are inviting you to complete a survey about the Network of the National Library of Medicine All of Us Community Engagement Network (CEN). The purpose of the survey is to learn about your experiences participating in the CEN and how we can improve our services to support your organization to be a trusted health resource in your community. The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Completing the survey is voluntary. Participants will be eligible to enter a random drawing for one of ten $25 Target gift cards. Only one person from each NNLM member organization is eligible to win a gift card. Please respond to the survey by February 26, 2021. If you have any questions about the survey, please contact Asih Asikin-Garmager at asih-asikin@uiowa.edu

HHS Announces a Special Enrollment Period for Health Coverage
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced a special period for health insurance enrollment of qualified individuals and families in states served by the HealthCare.gov Marketplace. Please note that some states run their own health insurance websites and may or may not make a similar offer. Visit HealthCare.gov to find local help.  The special enrollment period runs February 15-May 15.

The Conference on Academic Library Management (CALM)
The Conference on Academic Library Management (CALM) strives to fill a gap in the academic library professional development landscape by focusing on practical management skills and concrete practices. CALM offers a venue to collaborate with library managers across various academic institutions to imagine solutions to local problems. We acknowledge that our profession has a varied history with diversity, equity, and inclusion. CALM seeks to be an inclusive and welcoming space which encourages diversity of ideas and thought. Week of March 15. The conference is free but space is limited. Group registration is encouraged. Learn more about the conference and register

Tools for Teaching the Human Microbiome in the Classroom
Unlocking Life’s Code provides an interactive which highlights ten helpful online tools for understanding and teaching the human microbiome. The free tools are easily accessible with links provided. This is a resourceful way to define, explain, and display microbiome research to your students. 

Health Campaign: Mil Gracias for Not Smoking Indoors!
The Mil Gracias (a Thousand Thanks) for Not Smoking Indoors amid COVID-19! public health campaign from Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio helps people share gratitude for smokers who respect others’ air by reducing exposure to secondhand smoke indoors. Visit the Mil Gracias website to download English and Spanish fact sheets and news about the health impacts of secondhand smoke, the need for smoke-free multifamily housing and resources to help smokers quit if they are ready.

*REALM project Test 7 and 8 results available
As part of the REALM (REopening Archives, Libraries, and Museums) research, Battelle is conducting natural attenuation studies to provide information on how long the virus may survive on materials common to archives, libraries, and museums. The studies are conducted by applying the virulent SARS-CoV-2 virus on five materials (per test set) held at standard room temperature (68°F to 75°F; 22±2°C) and relative humidity conditions (30 to 50 percent). The REALM project has published the results of Tests 7 and 8. These tests compared the effect of colder and warmer temperatures on the attenuation rate of the virus on materials previously tested at ambient room temperatures.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: February 16, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: February 9, 2021

Tue, 2021-02-09 11:03

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

DataFlash: NNLM’s Love Data Week (February 8th-12th)
Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data. This February 8th-12th, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.”…learn more about how to attend these data events on the blog 

Care for Your Heart with the NNLM Reading Club
Like tires, the heart does not run forever but can last longer if the driver makes smart choices. NNLM Reading Club’s February selections focus on the heart with three books that provide valuable information for people dealing with heart conditions…read the post to see the selected books 

Pop-up Library: Wellness Edition
Guest Contributor Karen Yother, Community Library Network, Idaho
Anyone who has worked with teens will tell you that they are quite the unique audience. What is trendy one day is out of favor the next. They eagerly develop their own personalities and interests, continually seeking ways to express their ideas in a variety of formats. But today’s teens also are under an intense amount of pressure at home, at school, from friends, the community and – unlike their earlier counterparts — in the virtual world…read more about this NNLM funded teen project on the blog

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account 

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation: Join us for a 1-hour moderated panel discussion featuring the NNLM Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” sessions four guest speakers who will weigh in on their careers and what brought them to working with open data, important skills and favorite resources, project management and working with a team, and more. February 12 from 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Serving Library Users with Mental Illness: A Crash Course on Controlling Clashes: This webinar increases your understanding of mental illness, teaches effective methods of communicating with mentally-ill patrons who are creating a disturbance in the library, helps you protect staff and patrons in rare instances of possible violence, and shows you how to locate resources you can lean on when necessary. February 17 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library: This hands-on class will cover the health information seeking behavior of consumers and the role of the librarian in the provision of health information for the public. Come learn about the evolution of consumer health, health literacy and the e-patient. Participants will leave equipped with knowledge of top consumer health sites. We will discuss creative ideas for health information outreach. March 1 – 26. (4 MLA CE) Register

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health: Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention.  The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour. March 3 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated. 

Going Black in Time: A Story of HIV: The University of Cincinnati’s Libraries is hosting a virtual workshop that will be held on February 10th, from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PT. Going Black in Time: A Story of HIV will present the timeline of the HIV epidemic and its impact on African Americans. The workshop will discuss heroes, advocates, and how prevention methods can alter the future of African Americans for the better. Learn more and register

You Are Your Own Best Heart Health Advocate: Women and Heart Disease: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences’ Women’s Health Awareness Virtual Series “RealTalk With the Experts”, this session addresses early warning signs of heart disease and prevention of heart disease in women. Thursday, February 11 from 3:30 – 4:45 p.m. PT. Registration deadline is February 10 

*COVID-19 Vaccination Policies: What to consider? (Indiana State Library): Are you wondering what to consider in forming your library’s policy on COVID-19 vaccinations? This webinar addresses the legality of mandatory vaccine policies during a pandemic and examines the pros and cons of such policies to help you determine which type of COVID-19 vaccine policy to propose to your board. February 18 at 7:00 a.m. PT. Check the calendar for a link to register

*Black Mental Health: A Time During COVID-19 and Civil Uprising: The COVID-19 virus has disrupted the world at an unprecedented scale. And over the past several months, Black Americans have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19 compared with their white counterparts. This has only been compounded by widespread civil uprising in protest of racial discrimination and police brutality. In these times, the African American Alumni Committee seeks to highlight the impact that these events have on the mental health of affected individuals, and to discuss and explore ways of coping and recovery. February 18 at 3:30 p.m. PT. Deadline to register is February 16

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

*“A Journey to Spur Innovation and Discovery”, from the NLM Director’s blog

Air Pollution is a Human Problem: Mary Catterall’s Campaign for a Livable Leeds

NLM Launches a New Online Exhibition – Making a World of Difference: Stories About Global Health

*“Mapping Which Coronavirus Variants Will Resist Antibody Treatments”, from the NIH Director’s blog

Show your heart a little love this American Heart month with self-care

Computerized adaptive screener may help identify youth at risk for suicide

NIH networks to advance emotional well-being research

Rare Disease Day at NIH, virtual conference March 1

*One Health: a holistic approach to improving the health of people, animals and the environment

Summary Now Available – “Genomic Response to the Social Environment: Implications for Health Outcomes”

* NIH launches database to track neurological symptoms associated with COVID-19

Research Highlight: NIH Initiative Expands Access to Resources for Early Psychosis Treatment and Research

FYI:

*Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) invites proposals for a virtual symposium
Responding to the COVID-19 Infodemic, on April 8th-9th, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the disparities of underserved, minority, and underrepresented communities. This includes ensuring equal understanding of accurate health information, education in hard hit communities, and valuing inclusion in clinical research to overcome COVID-19. The NNLM Virtual Symposium is an opportunity to engage with NNLM Network Members to address misinformation and mistrust, raise awareness about the pandemic, and efforts to combat it. Learn more and submit an application. The deadline to submit is February 26 at 8:59 p.m. PT.

*COVID-19 Resources

  • The Black Coalition Against COVID-19 has a collection of recorded webinars and town halls that offer information on the COVID-19 vaccine and the African American community.
  • The National Medical Association has made its COVID-19 Webinar Series available online. The series covers the impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on African American health professionals and the communities they serve, including a presentation on Climate Change and COVID-19.
  • Together Against COVID is a campaign from the Multicultural Health Foundation and Live Well San Diego that targets the African American community. The campaign provides facts, videos, information on COVID-19 vaccines and more.
  • The HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) has launched the COVID-19 Monoclonal Antibody Therapeutics Digital Toolkit. Monoclonal antibody therapeutic products may prevent eligible high-risk adults and children (ages 12-17) from requiring hospitalization. Use the ASPR toolkit to educate high-risk patients with mild to moderate symptoms and encourage them to take action.

February is Black History Month
This month HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) is celebrating the achievements of African Americans and honoring the significant role and impact they have made on all facets of life and society throughout U.S. history. During this Black History Month, OMH will partner with fellow Offices of Minority Health at HHS and healthcare professionals around the nation to focus on highlighting the impacts COVID-19 has on African Americans with underlining health issues such as uncontrolled hypertension. Visit the OMH website to learn more and download the Black History Month Toolkit

Cancer Facts and Figures for African Americans
February 4 is World Cancer Day. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), African Americans have the highest death rate and shortest survival of any racial and ethnic group in the U.S. for most cancers. The ACS’s Cancer Facts and Figures for African Americans, 2019-2021 provides the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, survival, screening and risk factors. Learn More Download the Publication 

* Vaccine Hesitancy in Rural America
The COVID-19 pandemic’s impact has been felt in communities across the U.S., from the largest urban centers to the smallest rural communities. As previous research has demonstrated, rural communities face unique challenges in responding to the pandemic due to medical workforce shortages, fewer hospital beds per capita, limited access to telehealth, and populations that are at elevated risk for COVID-19 related deaths due to age or chronic disease prevalence. In addition, a previous KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation) analysis found non-metro counties experienced a faster growth rate in the spread of the virus and more recent data confirms that this is still the case. In late 2020, there were countless stories of the most rural communities being impacted by the coronavirus including remote Alaska villages and Texas ranches, and an analysis from Pew Research Center found that sparsely populated rural areas were accounting for twice the number of coronavirus-related deaths as urban areas…read more

Racism as a Public Health Crisis: Three Responses
The American Public Health Association (APHA) has declared, “Racism is an ongoing public health crisis that needs our attention now.” States, counties, and cities across the country are answering the call by declaring racism as a public health crisis or emergency, which is an important first step in the movement to advance racial equity and justice. We have collected stories from some of these communities to lift up why they took this bold step, and how they plan to hold themselves accountable to action. Read the responses of Minneapolis (city response), Milwaukee County, WI (county response), and Nevada (state response) in this County Health Rankings report.

*States Begin to Incorporate Children into their COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Plans
In a recent blog post, the National Academy for State Health Policy describes how states are beginning to incorporate children in their COVID-19 vaccine distribution plans in preparation for when a vaccine is authorized for children under age 16. The blog post was produced as part of HRSA’s cooperative agreement with National Organizations of State and Local Officials.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: February 9, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Pop-up Library: Wellness Edition

Thu, 2021-02-04 20:05

By Guest Contributor Karen Yother, Community Library Network, Idaho

Anyone who has worked with teens will tell you that they are quite the unique audience. What is trendy one day is out of favor the next. They eagerly develop their own personalities and interests, continually seeking ways to express their ideas in a variety of formats. But today’s teens also are under an intense amount of pressure at home, at school, from friends, the community and – unlike their earlier counterparts — in the virtual world.

Project Rationale/Description/Goals

More than 19,600 teens live in our Northern Idaho Community Library Network service area: approximately 34% of our total population. Yet, similar to most communities, needed programs and services to teens are poorly funded. The Alliance for Excellent Education reports that teens (ages 12-18) receive the least financial support, lagging far behind what is invested in children (birth-11 years) and new adults (ages 19 and up).

Conversations with our community partners working with teens center around Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), and ways to help teens overcome traumatic experiences. The more ACEs a child experiences, the more likely he or she will suffer poor academic achievement, substance abuse, and toxic stress. According to the Child Mind Institute, nearly one in three teens meet the criteria for an anxiety disorder by the age of 18. Given that mental health is a topic not frequently discussed, teens often suffer in silence. That needn’t happen as there are a variety of approaches to help teens who have experienced ACEs, including meditation, exercise, and spending time outdoors. To help allay the anxiety suffered by many teens, we developed Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition, with a focus on mindfulness, physical activity, and nutrition.

Our Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project was funded by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region. Our project goal was to provide health literacy programming along with technology access, exploration, and training to teens in the Community Library Network service area. We planned to use a mobile discovery bike and van to reach young members whose communities lack the facilities and infrastructure to offer wellness programming by using tech-discovery options.

Through this wellness initiative, teens would gain first-hand experience with various mindfulness techniques, access technology to find quality health resources, and discover how their local library is available to assist their wellness exploration, practices and learning.

Regrettably, onset of the COVID pandemic required us to forego the majority of our programming for the time being. Following is a report of what we planned to accomplish … and what we still hope to achieve, once conditions allow.

Project Plans

Our project focuses on teens ages 11-18 and their health literacy needs, specifically providing them access to quality health information and community resources to help reduce stress and anxiety. We identified teens’ health and wellness because teens increasingly use our library for respite and safe harbor. Our project embraces one of the core tenets of precision medicine, a focus of the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network and aimed to equip teens with access to quality health information and resources, as well as to empower them to make the best choices for themselves. According to the Precision Medicine Initiative, precision medicine is “an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person.” While we are not medical professionals, we recognize the individuality of teens in our community and the need to offer a variety of programs and resources to meet their unique and varying needs.

The Wellness Open House is one program we designed to offer through Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition. Health, wellness, alternative medicine, and other practitioners were invited to participate, share information, and provide demonstrations as appropriate. All of Us materials would be distributed to all attendees in an effort to raise awareness of the All of Us Research Project. While the Wellness Open House was designed with teens in mind, the event was also open to their family members and the general public. COVID-19 put our Open House on hold, but plans are in place to offer this event later this year.

Many families within our District’s 1,100 square miles lack access to technology and quality health resources, especially in our rural areas. Four of our library communities — Athol, Harrison, Pinehurst and Spirit Lake — are towns with fewer than 2,500 people. These small towns lack the resources and infrastructure to expose teens and families to the countless educational, cultural and entertainment opportunities available through today’s technology. This lack of technology access coupled with work and school schedules, shelter and transportation difficulties, add to the stress of daily life for many teens, contributing to increased anxiety. All of these factors are obstacles to success.

We planned to use Pop-Up Library Book Bikes, equipped with hotspots, tablets, virtual and augmented reality equipment to bring programming to neighborhoods, parks and targeted community locations.  Engaging programs such as meditation, yoga, Zumba, healthful cooking, and paint & sip will be scheduled once it is safe again to do so. Teens will receive access to new technologies and learn about health resources for their personal health literacy toolkits.

During our planning sessions, the Youth Services (YS) team discussed the project’s programs, community partnerships, timelines and branding needs. We wanted to create a brand that empowered teens and opened them up to a world of possibilities. The team selected “I Am” as the theme to empower teens to think of all the positive characteristics to define themselves: bold, strong, empowered, loved, fearless, creative. Once the project’s logo was completed, using Community Library Network funds, we created materials for distribution at community events to engage teens, including stickers, magnets, and stress balls.

We built a project website, I am ME, which provides quality health resources for teens. Topics include mental health, self-care, relaxation, food, be your best self, along with hotlines, helplines, and text lines.

We purchased six (6) sandwich boards to use as ‘talk back’ boards. Drawing from the Public Library Association Project Outcomes evaluation tools, we selected three questions for teen response at each program’s conclusion:

  1. Did you learn something helpful?
  2. Are you more aware of health-related resources and services provided by the library?
  3. What did you like most about the program?

Using this method, teens will write their responses on Post-it notes and place them under each question, giving them an opportunity to respond honestly and anonymously.

COVID-19

We held a few initial programs and were just about to fully launch our Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project when the pandemic hit and everything shut down. Staff attempted to re-invent programs to meet community health requirements but were unable to do so in a safe, engaging way. Throughout the pandemic, it has been heartbreaking for staff to see teens stressed and distanced from both their friends and routines, knowing there is nothing we can do. Pre-COVID-19, the library was a safe place for teens to come and hang out, chat with friends and staff, and attend quality programs. Being closed has heightened teens need for a safe place and not being able to provide it was a significant blow to the staff as well as the community.

Recently our local schools began offering mental health and suicide prevention programs to the 3rd-5th grade students. Because of its “I Am” initiative through the Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project, the library is poised to provide support and resources to the schools for these students. Being able to support and embed ourselves in the community again to provide kids and teens with tools for their well-being toolbelt is gratifying.

Our “Why”

The Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project’s “I Am” initiative is important because one year ago, three teens in our community committed suicide. We are not naïve to think that this project, once fully launched, will save every teen who struggles with mental health, self-esteem, family issues, food insecurity, bullying, trauma – the list of ACEs goes on and on. Rather, we want the library, through this project, to be part of the solution, the place teens will think of to:

  • provide the tools and resources to help them make the best decisions possible.
  • learn to take a deep breath before they lash out.
  • understand the connection between a balanced diet and their overall health.
  • understand the importance of a good night’s sleep.
  • learn ways to gather their thoughts, use positive internal messaging, find ways to manage stress, and develop skills to have a healthy school/work life balance.

Will our teens always make the ‘right’ decision? No. But having the proper tools gets them one step closer and that is something we can all support.

The Community Library Network’s mission, “We empower discovery” encompasses nearly every aspect of what we do. This project aligns closely with what we aim to accomplish every day – to better the lives of our members through empowerment. While we did not get to complete the entire year of our project’s plans, we consider this project one of our stars. Our early efforts were well-received by teens; community members expressed their appreciation; partners have signed on to support it post-pandemic; and staff frequently share new ideas and plans for upcoming virtual and in-person programs.

Setting COVID-19 aside, issues facing teens today can feel overwhelming and insurmountable. The spotlight the pandemic shone on teen health was a stark reminder of why what we do is so important. While we did not have the opportunity to host every aspect of our projects’ programs or events that we wanted to in 2020, we’ve chosen to persevere and forge ahead into 2021 with renewed vigor and excitement to reach the teens in our community and ensure access to quality health resources and programs in whatever format possible.

Note: If you would like more information about the Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project, you may reach Karen Yother at: kareny@communitylibrary.net

The post Pop-up Library: Wellness Edition first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: NNLM’s Love Data Week (February 8th-12th)

Thu, 2021-02-04 11:06

See the source image

Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data. This February 8th-12th, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.”

At four 30-minute “coffee chat” sessions fromMonday through Thursday, listen to each one of our guest experts discuss their work and answer audience questions in an informal setting. Then, join us on Friday as part of the RDM Webinar Series for a moderated panel discussion with all speakers to discuss bigger questions about their experiences working with open data.

Monday, Feb 8th

Reflections on Open Access and Ethics in Data Literacy Training

Ibraheem Ali, Sciences Data Librarian, University of California Los Angeles

Tuesday, Feb 9th

How Open Data Can Support a Pandemic Response

Bob Gradeck, Project Director, Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center

Wednesday, Feb 10th

Advocating for Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications

Yasmeen Shorish, Associate Professor & Head of Scholarly Communications, James Madison University Libraries

Thursday, Feb 11th

If You Share It, Will They Come? Exploring How Open Data Are Reused

Lisa Federer, Data Science and Open Science Librarian at the National Library of Medicine

Friday, Feb 12th

Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation

Our panelists will weigh in on their careers and what brought them to working with open data, important skills and favorite resources, project management and working with a team, and more.

The post DataFlash: NNLM’s Love Data Week (February 8th-12th) first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Care for Your Heart with the NNLM Reading Club

Tue, 2021-02-02 20:00

The reason we have cancer and heart disease is the same reason you can’t get rid of the wear and tear on your tires on your car: as soon as you use them, you are wearing them away. You can’t make eternal tires, and it’s the same with the human body.                                                                                                         – S. Jay Olshansky, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago

Like tires, the heart does not run forever but can last longer if the driver makes smart choices. NNLM Reading Club’s February selections focus on the heart with three books that provide valuable information for people dealing with heart conditions.

When the Words Suddenly Stopped by Vivian King l Being Empowered for a Healthy Heart by Phoebe Chi l Restart Your Heart by Aseem Desai

In Being Empowered for a Healthy Heart: A Personal Guide to Taking Control of Your Health While Living with Chronic Conditions, Dr. Phoebe Chi seeks to empower those with chronic diseases of all types, including heart disease and high blood pressure, in the self-management of their conditions. The internal medicine and public health physician does so with practical exercises and tools in each chapter to address symptoms, even throwing some poetry into the mix.

Restart Your Heart: The Playbook for Thriving with AFib by cardiac electrophysiologist Dr. Aseem Desai clears up some of the confusion surrounding atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm that can interfere with blood flow. In addition to providing knowledge about AFib, Desai discusses how to deal with the diagnosis from a mental and emotional perspective.

Finally, in When the Words Suddenly Stopped, former television broadcast journalist Vivian King describes her experience recovering from a stroke that took away her voice, sharing how determination bolstered by a reliance on faith, family and friends allowed her to recover.

Strengthening your heart knowledge can help strengthen your heart. We hope these books will provide you an opportunity to do both. Visit the NNLM Reading Club for discussion guides to these titles and other useful information.

The post Care for Your Heart with the NNLM Reading Club first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: February 2, 2021

Tue, 2021-02-02 10:54

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

New Guide from the NNLM: Substance Use Disorders
The Network of National Library of Medicine’s Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Initiative aims raise awareness of National Library of Medicine’s Substance Use Disorders resources and the resources of partner organizations. ​As part of this initiative, Network of the National Library of Medicine staff launched a new guide to information on Substance Use Disorders. The guide links to free and reliable online resources for …read the blog to learn more about the guide

Self-Learning Source: AHA’s Interactive Cardiovascular Library
February is American Heart Month. It’s a good time to start taking steps to improve your health. (Remember those New Year’s resolutions?) Consider also taking some time this month to get better acquainted with heart health. The American Heart Association has an interactive cardiovascular library called “Watch, Learn and Live”. Through text, animation and graphics, viewers can learn about over 20 topics related to heart health…learn more about this interactive tool on the blog

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open”: Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data – its management, preservation, sharing, use and re-use, and more. This February 8th-12th, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.” At four 30 minute “coffee chat” sessions on Monday through Thursday, listen to each one of our guest experts discuss their work and answer audience questions in an informal setting. Then, join us on Friday as part of the RDM Webinar Series for a moderated panel discussion with all speakers to discuss bigger questions about their experiences working with open data. Each session is from 10:00 – 10:30 a.m. PT. Please register separately for each session

  • February 8: Reflections on Open Access and Ethics in Data Literacy Training
  • February 9: How Open Data Can Support a Pandemic Response
  • February 10: Advocating for Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications
  • February 11: If You Share It, Will They Come? Exploring How Open Data Are Reused

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation: Join us for a 1-hour moderated panel discussion featuring the NNLM Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” sessions four guest speakers who will weigh in on their careers and what brought them to working with open data, important skills and favorite resources, project management and working with a team, and more. February 12 from 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

NLM’s History of Medicine Division: A Research Collection of Rare Medical Materials: The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) History of Medicine Division has one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of historical material related to health and disease. In this session you will learn how the History of Medicine Division approaches acquisition and conservation; discover hidden treasures in the collection and get to know how to access this vast resource. Most importantly, you will see how such collections remain relevant in a world concerned with data science, health care to diverse groups, and reacting to pandemics. February 24 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Caring for the Mind: Providing Mental Health Information At Your Library: In this Caring for the Mind webinar, participants will learn how to effectively provide mental health information at their libraries. Participants will learn about the best electronic resources to consult as well as ways to improve their print collections. Best approaches for handling interactions with emotional patrons will also be discussed. March 16 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Launching and Leading the Librarian Reserve Corps: Developing an agile librarian network in response to COVID-19: This is a presentation on librarian visioning, leadership, management, and trial by fire. It provides a unique perspective on launching and leading an international network of librarian volunteers in a new role: emergency responders in the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn how Elaine Hicks lead an international team who ushered the Librarian Reserve Corps (LRC) into reality. Nearly a year later, the LRC continues to provide expertise and guidance on a myriad of scholarly communications issues concerning COVID-19 research. Elaine, Stacy Brody, and Sara Loree were awarded Library Journal’s 2021 Librarians of the Year in recognition of their important work. April 21 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated. 

Coverage to Care: How to Use Your Health Coverage: From Coverage to Care is hosting a partner webinar and will be joined by our HHS colleague to discuss the newly updated HealthFinder website! Join us to hear about ways to educate consumers about their health coverage and how to empower them to take action and make the most of their coverage.  February 4 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register 

STEM, Health, and Mental Health (National Girls’ Collaborative Project): How can STEM programming promote a healthier lifestyle? How does spending time in the great outdoors make you feel? Join a panel of speakers from the Alliance for a Healthier Generation and Gateway to the Great Outdoors as they share ways to connect physical and mental health to STEM learning. February 9 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

COVID-19 Vaccination Policies: What to consider? (Indiana State Library): Are you wondering what to consider in forming your library’s policy on COVID-19 vaccinations? This webinar addresses the legality of mandatory vaccine policies during a pandemic and examines the pros and cons of such policies to help you determine which type of COVID-19 vaccine policy to propose to your board. February 18 at 7:00 a.m. PT. Check the calendar for a link to register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

*“Health Data Standards: A Common Language to Support Research and Health Care”, from the NLM Director’s blog

*COVID-19 Web Collecting: Reflections at One Year

*“Following COVID-19 Vaccines Across the United States”, from the NIH Director’s blog

*NIH Director: Collaboration Amid Chaos, and Biden’s First 100 Days (Track the Vax podcast)

*Watch as Vice President Kamala Harris receives her second dose of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine at the NIH Clinical Center

*Janssen Investigational COVID-19 Vaccine: Interim Analysis of Phase 3 Clinical Data Released

The February issue of NIH News in Health includes articles on lowering cancer risk, eating for a healthy heart, and the truth about the benefits of chocolate

AI Tools Provide Picture of Cervical Health

The Cancer Moonshot: A Midpoint Progress Update

Bold Predictions for Human Genomics by 2030, a new series about the bold predictions from the 2020 Strategic Vision, learn more about this 10 part series and register

Employment may slow memory decline for women

*Severe COVID-19 in pregnancy associated with preterm birth, other complications. NIH-funded study suggests mother-to-infant transmission appears to be rare

National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities celebrated 10 years as an NIH institute: A Year in Review and a Path Forward

FYI:

*COVID-19 Resources

Health Campaign: Mil Gracias for Not Smoking Indoors!
The Mil Gracias (a Thousand Thanks) for Not Smoking Indoors amid COVID-19! public health campaign from Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio helps people share gratitude for smokers who respect others’ air by reducing exposure to secondhand smoke indoors. Visit the Mil Gracias website to download English and Spanish fact sheets and news about the health impacts of secondhand smoke, the need for smoke-free multifamily housing and resources to help smokers quit if they are ready.

Publication: Understanding and Living with Glaucoma
This free, 40-page booklet, published by the Glaucoma Research Foundation, provides information on the different types of glaucoma, how to detect and treat glaucoma, tips on speaking and working with your eye doctor, and how to adjust your day-to-day activities to take good care of your eye health. English Booklet (PDF) Spanish Booklet (PDF)

Announcing Essential Graphic Medicine: An Annotated Bibliography
Funded by an ALA Carnegie-Whitney grant, which supports the preparation and publication of reading lists and other bibliographical aids, Alice Jaggers and Matthew Noe have been developing this tool since early 2018 as a way to aid library workers in the development of graphic medicine collections. Learn more and access the annotated bibliography on the Graphic Medicine website.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: February 2, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Self-Learning Source: AHA’s Interactive Cardiovascular Library

Mon, 2021-02-01 12:56

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Significant contributors to heart disease include high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and high cholesterol.

February is American Heart Month. It’s a good time to start taking steps to improve your health. (Remember those New Year’s resolutions?) Consider also taking some time this month to get better acquainted with heart health.

The American Heart Association has an interactive cardiovascular library called “Watch, Learn and Live”. Through text, animation and graphics, viewers can learn about over 20 topics related to heart health. What’s nice about the interactive library is that plain text is used with the graphics while more detailed information is included on the left side-bar. The information is short segments and is easy to review as needed.

Some of the topics included:

  • blood pressure
  • cholesterol
  • stent
  • heart attack
  • hemorrhagic stroke
  • cardiac catheterization

Keep in mind, this is not meant to be a substitute for a doctor or professional advice or treatment. Schedule a time for a health check-up and talk to your doctor about cholesterol, blood pressure, and your heart health risks. In fact, let your doctor know that you are using this educational resource to learn more about your health.

The post Self-Learning Source: AHA’s Interactive Cardiovascular Library first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

New Guide from the NNLM: Substance Use Disorders

Wed, 2021-01-27 03:00

The Network of National Library of Medicine’s Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Initiative aims raise awareness of National Library of Medicine’s Substance Use Disorders resources and the resources of partner organizations. ​

As part of this initiative, Network of the National Library of Medicine staff launched a new guide to information on Substance Use Disorders. The guide links to free and reliable online resources for general and specific audiences. The “SUD Resources: General” tab is a great place to start learning about SUD with resources from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and more. The “Libraries” tab provides educational information about Narcan/ Naloxone, a resource guide for public libraries, and more. The “Educators” tab includes classroom resources and information for all ages. The “Community Based Organizations” tab focuses on response to Opioid use in communities and includes the Opioid Epidemic Practical Toolkit: Helping Faith and Community Leaders” from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The “Public Health” tab provides information for public health professionals, including links to resources for locating guidelines, research, and training, and information about safe disposal of unused medications. “Resources by Age or Population” lists recommended resources specific to families, rural populations, faith-based organizations, teens and young adults, and women. The “SUD Training & Education” tab includes links to recorded webinars and other online trainings, suitable for all audiences.

Check the NNLM’s Class Catalog for additional upcoming and recorded webinars related to Substance Use Disorder.

The post New Guide from the NNLM: Substance Use Disorders first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: January 26, 2021

Tue, 2021-01-26 11:01

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

*Addressing Attitudes and Science Mistrust During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Please join the webinar, “Addressing Attitudes and Science Mistrust During the COVID-19 Pandemic on Please join the webinar, “Addressing Attitudes and Science Mistrust During the COVID-19 Pandemic January 28 at 9:30 a.m. PT. The webinar will last approximately 2 hours. This national program is brought to us by NNLM SCR and the Texas CEAL Consortium as part of the NIH Community Engagement Alliance (CEAL) Against COVID-19 Disparities will include NLM Director, Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD. The Q&A will be moderated by Ms. Anna Kuchment, Science Reporter for the Dallas Morning News. Learn more about this event and how to register on the blog

Members, We Need Your Help: Confirm or Update your NNLM PNR Membership Record
The Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Northwest Region has 446 member organizations. Maintaining current membership records allows us to connect members and stay in touch. We are in the process of updating our membership records…learn how to help on the blog post

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) for Libraries: The Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Northwest Region (NNLM PNR) & our colleagues at NNLM Southeastern Atlantic Region are partnering to bring you a two-part webinar series that will provide attendees with the awareness and tools necessary to face disasters of any kind under the guidance of emergency preparedness expert Dan Wilson from the University of Virginia.

  • Part 1, Tuesday, January 26 from 10:00 – 12:30 p.m. PT
    This first session will provide first-hand accounts of how libraries have responded to a disaster and introduce a template for participants to begin creating their own one-page continuity of operations plan.
    Register for Part 1
  • Part 2, Wednesday, February 10 from 10:00 – 12:30 p.m. PT
    This second session will answer attendee questions that arose while writing their COOP, and match libraries from the northwest with similar libraries in the southeast who can potentially partner as a backup library.
    Register for Part 2

After attending both sessions, participants are eligible for 4 MLA (Medical Library Association) CE credits. This class is also eligible for Disaster Information Specialization continuing education credit awarded by the Medical Library Association.

Instructor Training from The Carpentries and NNLM: The National Training Office (NTO) invites applications to participate in online Instructor Training from The Carpentries (Data Carpentry, Library Carpentry, and Software Carpentry). This highly-sought after training is the first step in becoming a certified instructor for The Carpentries. Instructors organize and teach Carpentry workshops to spread data literacy and programmatic skills both locally and globally. Members of The Carpentries Instructor community work together to actively grow their instructional and technical skills. Becoming an Instructor is a great step to leveling-up your own technical skills and helps you to become a more effective technical communicator. Dates: Workshops will be held online March 2-5, 2021 9 am – 1 pm PT. You must plan to attend all sessions. Deadline to apply is January 29. Learn more about this training and apply on the NTO blog

* Concrete Recommendations for Cutting Through Misinformation During the COVID-19 Pandemic: The COVID-19 pandemic presents multifaceted challenges for the US health care system. One such challenge is in delivering vital health information to the public—a task made harder by the scourge of health misinformation across the information ecosystem. For this event, we will discuss recommendations for public health advocates and communication professionals drafting communication campaigns to maximize the chance that timely health advisories reach the public. February 2 at 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Public Libraries Respond to the Opioid Crisis with Their Community: The nation is experiencing an ongoing opioid epidemic and communities across the country have been experiencing the epidemic’s impact. Eight case studies were conducted in different types of communities within the United States. Dr. Connaway will highlight the findings based on interviews with library staff, library board members, the staff at community partner organizations, and members of each of the eight communities. The resources and findings of this project will help public library staff and their community partners develop effective strategies to work together to address the opioid epidemic in America. (1 MLA CE) Register

National Library of Medicine Resources for Citizen Scientists: Libraries are ideal partners for citizen scientists! In this class, participants can expect to learn how to support citizen science in their communities and ways that libraries can easily participate. Participants will learn about citizen science library program models, free National Library of Medicine resources to incorporate into citizen science library programs, and sources of funding to explore for buying testing kits or supporting community research efforts. Citizen science library programs are perfect for all ages, and all types of libraries. February 25 at 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Social and Environmental Determinants of Maternal Health Disparities and a Roadmap to Effective Solutions: This Emerging Trends webinar series presentation will describe historical and contemporary pathways by which features of the physical and social environments likely contribute to maternal health disparities. Potential interventions along with priorities for future research will also be described. April 20 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated. 

2021 Institute for Research Design in Libraries (IRDL) Scholars’ Speaker Series: Thinking Critically about Research and Power: This series of presentations is designed to shine a spotlight on voices and ideas that challenge traditional ways of conducting research. It surveys various topics with the intention of inspiring research explicitly rooted in social justice. The series is coordinated by a working group of IRDL Scholars. As librarians, educators, and researchers, we are pleased to share this opportunity to reflect and incorporate what we learn from these speakers into our own research efforts, so that our methodologies integrate anti-racist and anti-colonial practices. Each speaker session is free to attend via Zoom; anyone interested is welcome. Directly following each presentation, there will be an opportunity to discuss the topic further together. First session is January 27 from 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. PT with featured speaker, Kim TallBear, Associate Professor, Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta, and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment. Visit the website to see session details and register

The Role of Critical Health Literacy in Addressing Social Determinants of Health: A Workshop: The National Academies Roundtable on Health Literacy will host a workshop exploring critical health literacy’s (CHL’s) role in addressing the social determinants of health. The workshop will explore a variety of CHL skills ranging from the ability to contextualize information to engage in health care decision-making, to the ability to recognize the policy contexts that affect health. The workshop will also explore how these skills support effective social and political action and thus assist individuals and communities in addressing the social environment that shape their health and well-being. January 27 from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. PT. Register

School, Snacks, Safety, and Sanity: Part 2 of Government Resources for the Smallest Child to the Teen and in Between: In this FDLP.gov webinar, presenters will dig deeper into the state of America’s children with statistics and resources for where to find the data. Additionally, resources will be featured for parents and caregivers to supplement education, provide better nutrition, and focus on the physical and emotional needs of our children and grandchildren. There will also be fun activities like games and crafts. Join us for this informative webinar for yourself and for your library users. February 2 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register 

Resources for Wellbeing: Toolkit Tour for Rural & Small Libraries: This WebJunction webinar will introduce tools for helping libraries improve social wellbeing in their communities, created from the Rural Library Service & Social Wellbeing Project. February 5 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register

Coverage to Care: How to Use Your Health Coverage: From Coverage to Care is hosting a partner webinar and will be joined by our HHS colleague to discuss the newly updated HealthFinder website! Join us to hear about ways to educate consumers about their health coverage and how to empower them to take action and make the most of their coverage.  February 4 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register

*Library Journal’s Winter Summit: Building the Next Normal: This free, day-long, virtual convening will feature library leaders at all levels who will discuss lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic and share actionable ideas on how you can incorporate them into your post-COVID strategy. February 23 from 7:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. PT. Learn more and register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

NLM Launches a New Online Exhibition – Fifty Years Ago: The Darkening Day

NLM Names Acting Scientific Director for NLM’s Intramural Research Program and Acting Director for NLM’s Extramural Programs

DOCLINE will be unavailable starting at 8:00 a.m. PT on Wednesday, January 27 for 30 – 60 minutes for an update

National Library of Medicine is recruiting for 2021-2022 Associate Fellows, Deadline for applications is Thursday, January 28

As of January 21, the, UMLS Terminology Services will no longer accept username and password credentials. Users will need to sign in using identity provider (Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Login.gov, Research Organization, NIH) credentials

*“Nanoparticle Technology Holds Promise for Protecting Against Many Coronavirus Strains at Once”, from the NIH Director’s blog

On Tuesday, February 9 at 11:00 a.m. PT, NIH Directory, Dr. Collins will speak about “Harmonizing the Spiritual and Scientific Worldviews”, watch live on NIH VideoCast

Methamphetamine overdose deaths rise sharply nationwide

NIH study compares low-fat, plant-based diet to low-carb, animal-based diet

Researchers identify new genetic disorder that affects brain, craniofacial skeleton

*Science Update: Childbirth during COVID-19 pandemic associated with anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, NIH-supported study suggests

*NIBIB (National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering) – funded collaboration launches its first set of COVID-19 medical images

* NIH Officials Highlight COVID-19 Vaccine Facts, Unknowns for Healthcare Providers

FYI:

*COVID-19 Resources

Experience Medical Library Association (MLA) Open Membership Month
MLA is the largest organization committed to fostering excellence in health sciences librarianship. This February, learn why more than 3,000 individual members and 400 institutions make MLA their professional home. Join MLA for our Experience MLA Open Membership Month! Throughout all of February, we’re hosting a series of no-cost events like caucus meet and greets, webinars, and an open science session, all designed to help you get the most out of your MLA membership. Plus, new members get a free month of membership starting February 1. Start your trial today.

Mountain Pacific Health Science Libraries Conference
Join your medical librarian colleagues at the upcoming Mountain Pacific Health Science Libraries Conference on February 9-11, 2021. The conference will comprise of paper presentations, lightning talks, and posters submitted by librarians from the Mountain Pacific Region, from both the U.S. and Canada. There will be opportunities to discuss a wide range of topics, including online instruction, social justice, building diverse collections, and more! Three continuing education classes are also offered on February 8 and 12. Both the conference and the CEs are free. Learn more and register

New Timeline and Science/History Lesson Plans for the Classroom: Henrietta Lacks’ Life and Contributions to Medical Research
Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code presents a new timeline highlighting the life of Henrietta Lacks and the medical science discoveries resulting from her cells known as HeLa cells. As you scroll through the timeline, you will learn more about who Henrietta Lacks was, how HeLa cells were discovered, and how medical science has benefitted. The timeline complements four new lesson plans created by K-12 educators in partnership with the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Human Genome Research Institute. The lesson plans explore a variety of topics that interconnect Henrietta Lacks’ life and experiences and highlight the importance of these topics to our current understanding of science and society. Each lesson plan comes with instructional materials including resource sheets, PowerPoint slides, and introductory activities. Applicable Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards are listed, and each lesson plan is available in PDF form for easy download. 

Climate Change, Health, and Equity: A Guide for Local Health Departments
“Climate Change, Health, and Equity: A Guide for Local Health Departments”, published by the Public Health Institute Center for Climate Change and Health, is designed to help local public health departments integrate climate change and health equity into practice. The guide discusses what local health departments can do to include climate change and health equity into assessment and surveillance, intersectoral collaboration, community engagement and education, climate and health communications, preparedness and more.

*New Telehealth Tools on Telehealth.HHS.gov
Telehealth.HHS.gov has added two new telehealth resources for health care providers supported by HRSA’s Licensure Portability Program and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act funding. ProviderBridge.org is a platform that assists with mobilizing volunteer health care professionals to treat patients during public health emergencies. The site supports medical license portability to connect health care professionals with state agencies and health care entities to increase access to care for patients in rural and underserved communities. The site also provides state-by-state telehealth information and resources to assist providers with telehealth licensure questions. Another tool, licensureproject.org, provides up-to-date information on emergency regulation and licensing for psychologists, occupational therapists, physician assistants and social workers. Resources include state-specific tools related to licensure, telehealth and COVID-19 as well as online and phone support.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: January 26, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Addressing Attitudes and Science Mistrust During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Wed, 2021-01-20 20:07

Please join NNLM for this important webinar: Addressing Attitudes and Science Mistrust During the COVID-19 Pandemic

When:  Thursday, January 28th at 9:30am PT / 10:30am MT / 11:30am CT / 12:30pm ET [It will last approximately two (2) hours.]

This national program is brought to us by NNLM SCR and the Texas CEAL Consortium as part of the NIH Community Engagement Alliance (CEAL) Against COVID-19 Disparities will include NLM Director, Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD. The Q&A will be moderated by Ms. Anna Kuchment, Science Reporter for the Dallas Morning News.

The agenda  features the following speakers:

  • “History of Medical Mistrust in the African American Community” by Dr. Torrence Stepteau, Precision Pain Solutions, a division of APW
  • Learning Vaccine Hesitancy from the 30,000 Subjects of the HowWeFeel Project” by Dr. Xihong Lin, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • “NIH Initiatives and CEAL” by Dr. George A. Mensah, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
  • “COVID-19 Pandemic and its Effect on Trainees in NIGMS Programs” by Dr. Alison Gammie, Division of Training, Workforce Development and Diversity, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
  • “Effect of Covid-19 pandemic on underrepresented mentees, a Mentee’s perspective” by Dr. Amanda Roberts, National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN)
  • “Effect of Covid-19 pandemic on underrepresented mentees, a Mentor’s perspective” by Dr. Stephen Thomas, University of Maryland Center for Health Equity

Participants will be able to submit written questions during the Q&A and selected questions will be addressed by panelists.

Registration is free and is required for all attendees by using the registration link:

https://unthsc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_iAugQfpgRZ-fX9kOV8ECWA

Live Spanish interpretation will be provided.

Please share this announcement widely with your colleagues, partners, and community members. We hope to see you there!

The post Addressing Attitudes and Science Mistrust During the COVID-19 Pandemic first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Members, We Need Your Help: Confirm or Update your NNLM PNR Membership Record

Wed, 2021-01-20 17:55

The Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Northwest Region has 446 member organizations. Maintaining current membership records allows us to connect members and stay in touch. We are in the process of updating our membership records and need your help.

Confirm or Update Your Organization’s Membership Directory Record

You can help us by confirming or updating your organization’s record in the NNLM Membership Directory. To do this:

  • Search for your organization in the NNLM Membership Directory
  • Are the organization name, address, website, etc. correct?
    • If yes, email ehamstra AT uw DOT edu to confirm
    • If no, email updated information to ehamstra AT uw DOT edu
Confirm or Update Your Organization’s NNLM Liaison

The NNLM Liaison listed for each organization is our main contact for the member organization. If this information is not correct, please email ehamstra AT uw DOT edu to have the current liaison removed and a new liaison added.

If you want to be listed as the liaison you will need a NNLM.gov username and password—the username and password you use to login to register for webinars. If you do not have a user account with NNLM.gov, please create a user account before emailing ehamstra AT uw DOT edu.

 

If your organization is not a member, and would like to become a member, fill out the membership form on our website.

The post Members, We Need Your Help: Confirm or Update your NNLM PNR Membership Record first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: January 19, 2021

Tue, 2021-01-19 10:59

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) for Libraries Emerging from a Worldwide Pandemic
It is essential for all libraries to resume planning for disasters, which includes knowing how to respond to a disaster, how to develop partnerships with local emergency planners, and how to find a backup library to mitigate the impact of a disaster…This two-part webinar series held on Tuesday, January 26 and Wednesday, February 10 will provide attendees with the awareness and tools necessary to face disasters of any kind. Hosted by Dan Wilson from the University of Virginia, Part 1 will provide first-hand accounts of how libraries have responded to a disaster and introduce a template for participants to begin creating their own one-page continuity of operations plan. Part 2 will answer attendee questions that arose while writing their COOP, and match libraries from the northwest with similar libraries in the southeast who can potentially partner as a backup library…read the blog post for complete details

*Self-learning Source: COVID-19 Vaccines
Are you a life-long learner? Learning something new can help stimulate our brains and re-energize us. Learning more about the science behind our health can help us become more engaged in our health, can help us better understand health news stories, and be more informed health consumers. Each month for 2021, this blog will feature a new education tool or resource to learn something new, especially regarding our health. This first post will focus on vaccines, specifically COVID-19 vaccines…check out the educational resource on the blog post

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

Identifying the Gaps: the Status of Data Management Education in Doctoral Nursing Programs: The last decade has seen data management (DM) knowledge and expertise become a foundational expectation not only for research but also for nursing informatics, data science, and data-intensive nursing practice. A concurrent dramatic increase in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs has resulted in many new students and faculty who need DM education, resources, and support. However, little was known about DM within doctoral nursing programs. Our research investigated the status of DM education as described by DNP and PhD program directors and examined nursing student handbooks, identifying the knowledge and resource gaps which are critical to fill in order for students to succeed. This presentation will summarize our research to date and review opportunities for health science librarians to translate our findings into practical collaborations at their institutions. January 19 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Ethics and Bias Mitigation: The increasingly widespread use of Natural Language Processing (NLP) in AI applications must be continually monitored for biases and false associations, especially those surrounding protected or disadvantaged classes of people. This webinar will discuss methods used to mitigate such biases and their weak points, using real world examples in civilian agencies. January 22 at 8:00 a.m. PT. No MLA CE available. Register 

Serving Library Users with Mental Illness: A Crash Course on Controlling Clashes: This webinar increases your understanding of mental illness, teaches effective methods of communicating with mentally-ill patrons who are creating a disturbance in the library, helps you protect staff and patrons in rare instances of possible violence, and shows you how to locate resources you can lean on when necessary. February 17 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Evaluation Pathways: A Webinar Series: A 5-part webinar series on the evaluation pathways. The pathways were developed to help NNLM members who are implementing projects with underserved communities, design and carry out effective evaluations that will help showcase all that you have achieved, while identifying ways that programming can improve. The pathways were developed to provide actionable resources to help you effectively design and implement an evaluation. View the recordings of past sessions and register for upcoming.

Moving Beyond User Satisfaction Surveys: Best Practices for Collecting User Feedback: This class will provide an interactive overview of groundbreaking tools and best practices for collecting user feedback. The purpose of the class is to learn how to design surveys in ways that gather actionable feedback about value delivered. In this 1 hour class, participants will also learn the best use cases for surveys and alternative assessment tools in the research process. Audience includes anyone collecting feedback to improve user experience, including healthcare instructors, organizational leaders, public and medical librarians, and patient educators. February 4 at 11:30 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

REopening Archives, Libraries and Museums: Project Update and Community Reflections: With six rounds of lab testing and two scientific literature reviews completed, project team members will provide an update on the latest results, summarize what is known and unknown about the virus, and highlight free resources. Presenters will share strategies implemented at their institutions, and the project team will preview what is on the horizon for REALM, and for LAMs. January 29 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

Research Institute for Public Libraries (RIPL) Data Bootcamp: This free webinar series features curriculum from the RIPL 2020 national event. These will NOT be webinars where you listen to a talking head the whole time; instead, please come ready to participate in a variety of interactive learning activities, some of which will occur in small groups in breakout rooms. Learn more and register

  • January 27 (10:00-11:30 PT): Observations: Data Hiding in Plain Sight
  • February 2 (10:00-11:30 PT): Can You Hear Me Now? Communicating Data to Stakeholders
  • February 23 (10:00-11:30 PT): Nothing for Us, Without Us: Getting Started with Culturally Responsive Evaluation
  • March 2 (11:00-12:30 PT): Meaningful Metrics for Your Organization
  • March 16 (11:00-12:30 PT): Evaluation + Culture = Change

Introduction to the Principles and Practice of Clinical Research (IPPCR): This free, self-paced, online course is open for registration until July 1, 2021. The IPPCR course is a lecture series from thought-leaders around the world covering: Study Designs, Measurement and Statistics, Ethical, Legal, Monitoring, and Regulatory Considerations, Preparing and Implementing Clinical Studies, Communicating research findings and other topics. Register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

From the NLM Director’s blog:

What’s new on NCBI  and NLM YouTube Channel

Behind the Camera: World Health Organization Photographers

NLM Traveling Exhibitions service has extended its ‘hold’ until further notice. What this means is:

  • NLM will not be accepting applications for future bookings until further notice.
  • If your institution recently applied for and was assigned a booking, we will follow up with you individually. Join the listserv for the most up-to-date information

*From the NIH Director’s blog:

*NIH launches central COVID-19 website for accurate information on vaccines, treatments and NIH-funded research

8 Tips for Improving Communication When Wearing a Face Covering

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) invites teens (16-18 years) and adults to participate in the Envisioning Health Equity Art Challenge to create images that represent NIMHD’s vision of an American in which all populations will have an equal opportunity to live long, healthy and productive lives. Deadline to submit is February 5

*At-home monitoring devices, tools play leading role in patient care during pandemic

*A new tool to prevent the spread of hospital-acquired infections in the era of COVID-19

Dementia may cause problems with money management years before diagnosis

FYI:

*COVID-19 Resources

*Battling the Infodemic: LJ’s 2021 Librarians of the Year
Congratulations to Library Journal’s 2021 Librarians of the Year, Elaine R. Hicks—research, education, and public health librarian at Tulane University in New Orleans Stacy Brody -reference and instruction librarian at the George Washington University (GWU) School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD; and Sara Loree – medical librarian at St. Luke’s Health System, Boise, ID for their work to organize and streamline COVID-19 information so badly needed by medical and health professionals, humanitarian organizations, researchers, and the public at a critical time in history. Read the LJ article to learn more about their important contribution.

*2020 Graphic Medicine in Review podcast
Listen to Graphic Medicine’s year end podcast with MK Czerwiec as she talks with a panel of guests about the best Graphic Medicine of 2020. The conversation begins with Shelley Wall and Michael Green discussing their article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) about the best graphic medicine of 2020, COVID-19 comics. Then graphic medicine librarians Alice Jaggers and Matthew Noe add their thoughts and further recommendations to the conversation. Finally, the group shares some of their favorite reading from 2020, graphic medicine and beyond. 

New MLA Data Services Specialization Keeps Pace with Expanding Roles for Health Sciences Librarians
As scientific research becomes increasingly data-driven, medical librarians and other health information professionals are ideally situated to provide support for data services. Many skills that health information professionals have traditionally applied to the scholarly literature are also relevant to data, such as curation, preservation, and access. To meet demand for training and certification in this area, the Education: Information Management Curriculum Committee commissioned the development of a new MLA (Medical Library Association) specialization: the Data Services Specialization (DSS). Learn more on the MLA website 

Rural Library & Social Wellbeing Project Overview
Public libraries located in rural locations have unique capabilities to generate social well-being outcomes in their communities. The Rural Library and Social Wellbeing project looked specifically at independent public libraries in the nation’s smallest and most isolated communities: towns without formal education facilities or hospitals and with fewer than 2,500 people. The website features a toolkit and an events calendar

Resource: Engaging Mexican Indigenous Families, Children, and Youth in Mental Health Treatment
The National Hispanic and Latino Mental Health Technology Transfer Center has published Engaging Mexican Indigenous Families, Children, and Youth in Mental Health Treatment, a factsheet that aims to create awareness of the cultural factors and what mental health professionals should know about engaging the Mexican Indigenous community in mental health treatment.

Healthy People 2030 Target-Setting Tools and Methods
The HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) have released statistical methods and analytical tools that were instrumental in setting transparent, data-driven targets for Healthy People 2030 on a national level. Public stakeholders can now access two of these new analytical tools for target setting: the Percent Improvement and Minimal Statistical Significance Tool and the Trend Analysis Tool. The HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) has also released information on how they use 6 target-setting methods to develop Healthy People 2030 objectives. Learn more and access the tools

* Improving Ventilation in Your Home
Staying home with only members of your household is the best way to keep SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) particles out of your home. However, if a visitor needs to be in your home, improving ventilation (air flow) can help prevent virus particles from accumulating in the air in your home. Good ventilation, along with other preventive actions, like staying 6 feet apart and wearing masks, can help prevent you from getting and spreading COVID-19. Visit the CDC to learn more about ventilating your home

News Use Across Social Media Platforms in 2020
About half of U.S. adults (53%) say they get news from social media “often” or “sometimes,” and this use is spread out across a number of different sites, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted Aug. 31-Sept. 7, 2020.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: January 19, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) for Libraries Emerging from a Worldwide Pandemic

Fri, 2021-01-15 15:28

We’re partnering with our colleagues at NNLM Southeastern/Atlantic to bring you this 2-part series. Thanks to Liz Waltman for putting together this introduction:

We all hope that by the end of the summer 2021 the COVID-19 pandemic will mainly be behind us, and the large bandwidth that the pandemic has taken up over the past year can be used for pressing needs that may have taken a back seat. One of those needs is disaster planning. While there is a vaccine to assuage the impact of a pandemic, there is no antidote for the personal and economic devastation from events that disrupt the provision of core library services, such as an earthquake, hurricane, tornado, or civil unrest. It is essential for all libraries to resume planning for disasters, which includes knowing how to respond to a disaster, how to develop partnerships with local emergency planners, and how to find a backup library to mitigate the impact of a disaster.

This two-part webinar series held on Tuesday, January 26 and Wednesday, February 10 will provide attendees with the awareness and tools necessary to face disasters of any kind. Hosted by Dan Wilson from the University of Virginia, Part 1 will provide first-hand accounts of how libraries have responded to a disaster and introduce a template for participants to begin creating their own one-page continuity of operations plan. Part 2 will answer attendee questions that arose while writing their COOP, and match libraries from the northwest with similar libraries in the southeast who can potentially partner as a backup library.

These two sessions are intended for members of the PNR & SEA regions: AK, AL, DC, GA, FL, ID, MD, MI, MT, NC, OR, PR, SC, TN, USVI, VA, WA, and WV. Participants from other regions are welcome to attend, however, we may be less likely to match you with a COOP partner.

After attending both sessions, participants are eligible for 4 MLA CE credits. This class is also eligible for Disaster Information Specialization continuing education credit awarded by the Medical Library Association.

Part 1 Registration

Part 2 Registration

For questions, please contact Liz Waltman.

The post Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) for Libraries Emerging from a Worldwide Pandemic first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Self-learning Source: COVID-19 Vaccines

Thu, 2021-01-14 08:00

Are you a life-long learner? Learning something new can help stimulate our brains and re-energize us. Learning more about the science behind our health can help us become more engaged in our health, can help us better understand health news stories, and be more informed health consumers.

Each month for 2021, this blog will feature a new education tool or resource to learn something new, especially regarding our health. This first post will focus on vaccines, specifically COVID-19 vaccines. You or your patrons may have questions about these vaccines and what better way to know more about them than to learn why vaccines are important and how they are developed.

The CDC specifically addresses COVID-19 vaccines including who gets priority to receive the vaccine, what to expect when getting vaccinated, and the benefits of being vaccinated. One nice feature is the section titled, “Understanding How COVID-19 Vaccines Work” including information about the types of COVID-19 vaccines.

For additional information about COVID-19 vaccines, visit the MedlinePlus health topic page, “COVID-19 Vaccines” which includes links to information in Spanish as well as information in video format.

Both the CDC and MedlinePlus are trusted sources of information as they are diligent about providing accurate, authoritative and current information.

The post Self-learning Source: COVID-19 Vaccines first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: January 12, 2021

Tue, 2021-01-12 11:03

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

A Resilient New Year!
How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden…read the blog post to learn about the featured books

Consumer Health Minute: New Dietary Guidelines
“Make Every Bite Count with the Dietary Guidelines!” is the newly released 2020-2025 edition of the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Dietary Guidelines. Every five years these guidelines are provided to the public and health professionals with the most current science based evidence to help in the promotion of good health and reduce the risk of disease…learn more about how you can inform your communities about the new Dietary Guidelines

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for clases and create a free account

NNLM offers on-demand classes, below is a sampling: 

NEW class- Consumer Health Collection Management: This asynchronous course reviews collection management principles and resources for health-related collections in public libraries. Watch a recorded presentation and complete 2 assignments to evaluate your own library’s health collection, and consider how you can improve your health related materials to better serve your community. The class was created in partnership with WebJunction. (4 MLA CE) Register

Introduction to Health Reference: Ethics and Best Practices: Learn how to conduct a health reference interview using ethical and effective communication strategies through interactive, self-paced tutorials and a synthesis exercise. (4 MLA CE) Register

Serving Diverse Communities: Building Cultural Competence and Humility into the Workplace: Participants will learn about some of the current critiques to using cultural competence principles and how cultural humility can be supplemented to create a more accepting, welcoming, and reflective working environment. Short demos of Think Cultural Health, PubMed, and Project Implicit are included to showcase three external resources that can be used to further explore this topic. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Finding and Using Health Statistics: Written by staff at AcademyHealth and provided by the U.S. National Library of Medicine, this tutorial on finding and using health statistics is aimed at students, librarians, and other professionals interested in an introduction to the principles behind health statistics. (3 MLA CE) Register

Grants and Proposal Writing-On Demand: Designed for beginning grant proposal writers, this class presents a general overview of the grant and funding processes as well as the level of detail required in a successful proposal. (3 MLA CE) Register

Research Data Management Training series: Research Data Management On Demand is made up of four stand-alone classes that introduce principles and practices of research data management. There is no particular order or progression in which to take the classes. Expect to spend up to four hours on each class learning through tutorials, videos and hands-on activities.

The individual classes include:

  • Open Science and Data Science
  • Data Curation and Documentation
  • Data Security, Storage and Preservation
  • Data Sharing and Publishing

(4 MLA CE per session) View the series and register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“Upcoming Training Opportunity: University-based Training for Research Careers in Biomedical Informatics and Data Science”, from the NLM Director’s blog

Important Changes to NCBI Accounts Coming in 2021

Learn more about instructor training from The Carpentries and NNLM

Defoe and the Plague Year

NLM Announces 2021 History Talks

*“What a Year it Was for Science Advances!”, from the NIH Director’s blog

Statement on the establishment of the Office of Nutrition Research within the NIH Office of the Director

January issue of NIH News in Health includes information about ways of improving well-being, preventing sepsis infections, postpartum depression and more

January is Glaucoma Awareness Month! Explore the resources provided by the National Eye Institute to help spread the word that treating glaucoma early can help prevent vision loss — and encourage people in your community to get a dilated eye exam

It’s Blood Donor Awareness Month and learn how the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute supports research to improve blood donations and transfusions

*Peer-Reviewed Report on Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Publishes Data from Phase 3 Clinical Trial Confirm Vaccine is Effective

* Large Clinical Trial Will Test Combination Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Mild/Moderate COVID-19

Physician-pharmacist collaboration may increase adherence to opioid addiction treatment

Employment Opportunity, Assistant Director, Regional Medical Library at UW

FYI:

*COVID-19 Resources

Congratulations to this year’s winners of the I Love My Librarian Award!
More than 1,850 library users submitted stories highlighting how their librarians had above and beyond in their communities and 10 winners were selected for their outstanding public service accomplishments including Anchorage Public Librarian, Elizabeth Moreau Nicolai. The virtual award ceremony will take place during ALA’s Midwinter conference at 12:30 p.m. PT on Saturday, January 23, and will be streamed on the American Library Association YouTube channel. Congratulations, Elizabeth!

Annual DNA Day Essay Contest
The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) is proud to support National DNA Day through the Annual DNA Day Essay Contest. This contest is open to students in grades 9-12 worldwide and asks students to examine, question, and reflect on important concepts in genetics. Essays are expected to be well-reasoned arguments that indicate a deep understanding of scientific concepts related to the essay question. They are evaluated by ASHG members through three rounds of scoring. The first place student winner receives $1,000 and their teacher receives a $1,000 genetics material grant. Submission deadline is March 3.

Virus Explorer: A New Interactive for Students from Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s BioInteractive
Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s BioInteractive team has created a new Virus Explorer Interactive that you can use in your classroom. This interactive module allows students to explore the diversity of viruses based on structure, genome type, host range, transmission mechanism, replication cycles, and vaccine availability. An accompanying worksheet guides students’ exploration.

HPV Vaccination Campaign for Young Adults and Health Care Providers Launches from HHS’ Office on Women’s Health
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States causing nearly 36,000 cases of cancer in men and women each year. Most of these cases could have been prevented by the HPV vaccine. To address issue, HHS’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH) Office on Women’s Health (OWH) announced its HPV VAX NOW campaign. The campaign will help young adults recognize their risk for HPV-related cancers, pre-cancerous cervical lesions, and genital warts, see the HPV vaccine as an important prevention strategy, and feel empowered to ask for the vaccine. Relevant information and resources from the campaign are also available.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: January 12, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

A Resilient New Year!

Wed, 2021-01-06 20:00

The New Year is a celebration of new beginnings.  This may be especially true as we welcome 2021, which we hope will be a resilient New Year. Resilience sustains us through adversity by cultivating practices that help us cope … and 2020 was nothing if not full of adversity.

How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden.

Resilient by Dr. Rick Hanson I The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook by Dr. Anneliese A. Singh I The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health by Dr. Rheeda Walker

In Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness, New York Times bestselling author Dr. Rick Hanson provides a roadmap to develop resilience. In a society that is so often toxic and unwelcoming, Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Tulane University’s first Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and a prolific author, offers skills to gain resilience in The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook. Noted Black mental health expert, Dr. Rheeda Walker, illuminates how to attain what she describes as “psychological fortitude” in The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health: Navigate an Unequal System, Learn Tools for Emotional Wellness, and Get the Help you Deserve.

Each of us can benefit from cultivating resilience, so let’s make 2021 a resilient New Year! To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related helpful information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Mental Health Resilience page.

1American Psychological Association. (2020, February 1). Building your resilience. http://www.apa.org/topics/resilience

The post A Resilient New Year! first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: New Dietary Guidelines

Wed, 2021-01-06 06:30

Many of your patrons and those you serve, follow the annual tradition of making New Year’s resolutions that may include diets, exercise or just leading a healthier life.

“Make Every Bite Count with the Dietary Guidelines!” is the newly released 2020-2025 edition of the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Dietary Guidelines. Every five years these guidelines are provided to the public and health professionals with the most current science based evidence to help in the promotion of good health and reduce the risk of disease.

The Guidelines include four key recommendations to help support healthy eating throughout our life. These key recommendations are listed below.

  1. Follow a healthy dietary pattern at every life stage.
  2. Customize and enjoy nutrient-dense food and beverage choices to reflect personal preferences, cultural traditions, and budgetary considerations.
  3. Focus on meeting food group needs with nutrient-dense foods and beverages, and stay within calorie limits.
  4. Limit food and beverages higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, and limit alcoholic beverages.

You can provide your community with scientifically based information about healthy eating with brochures and informative downloadable graphics on the dietary guidelines website as well as links to MyPlate.gov for additional tools and tips for a healthier diet.

The post Consumer Health Minute: New Dietary Guidelines first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: January 5, 2021

Tue, 2021-01-05 10:53

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for clases and create a free account

Evaluation Pathways: A Webinar Series: The pathways were developed to help NNLM members who are implementing projects with underserved communities, design and carry out effective evaluations that will help showcase all that you have achieved, while identifying ways that programming can improve. This series was developed to provide actionable resources to help you effectively design and implement an evaluation. This series does not provide MLA CE credits. Register for each individual session: 

  • K-12 Health: January 8 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register
  • LGBTQIA+ Health: January 15 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register
  • Race & Ethnicity: January 22 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register
  • Rural Health: January 29 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register

NNLM Reading Club Presents…an afternoon with Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D.: He’ll join our host, Edgar Gil Rico, National Alliance for Hispanic Health, to discuss his book, Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon. Dr. Q, as he is known, shares his journey from a child in a Mexican village to migrant farmworker in California to world-renown brain surgeon and researcher. Dr. Q will also answer audience questions. January 14 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Learn more about how to attend

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Ethics and Bias Mitigation: The increasingly widespread use of Natural Language Processing (NLP) in AI applications must be continually monitored for biases and false associations, especially those surrounding protected or disadvantaged classes of people. This webinar will discuss methods used to mitigate such biases and their weak points, using real world examples in civilian agencies. January 22 at 8:00 a.m. PT. No MLA CE credit. Register

Substance Use Disorder Treatment in the Time of COVID: Primary care clinicians face many challenges when addressing the complex needs of patients with chronic pain, substance use disorders or both. Over the last 10 months, the SARS-CoVID-2 pandemic has both increased and changed the challenges that healthcare providers face. You will learn about how SARS-CoVID-2 pandemic has changed SUD treatment and prescribing protocols. January 28 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Supporting Urban Native Youth: Mental Wellness Series: This webinar series hosted by the National Council of Urban Indian Health. Register for both sessions and view the recording of the first session.

  • Traditional Medicine, January 5 at 4:00 p.m. PT
  • LGBTQ2S+ Youth, January 27 at 10:00 a.m. PT. 1 pm PT

Differences Between the Influenza and COVID-19 Vaccine: This webinar will be hosted by the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) on January 6 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register 

PLA Leadership Lab: Embedding EDI in Library Leaders: Join this first-ever PLA Leadership Lab: Embedding EDI in Library Leaders, a virtual workshop that will explore transformational leadership through the lens of the current social crises, emphasizing equity, diversity, inclusion, and social justice (EDISJ) principles and approaches. Public library services have evolved with a constant mission to serve the public good but have demonstrated that equal access is not equitable for all. Embedding EDISJ in library leadership development requires a multi-pronged approach that relies on building trust internally with library staff and externally with community assets. This workshop consists of six live virtual classroom sessions that will take place Wednesday, 2/3/2021–Wednesday, 3/24/2021. Each 90-minute session will include open discussion, facilitated presentations, small group work, and Q&A. $400 for PLA members and $475 for non-members. Deadline to register is January 27.

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“Above and Beyond”, from the NLM Director’s blog

The National Library of Medicine is recruiting early career librarians to join its Associate Fellowship Program. Applications for next year’s cohort are due January 28, 2021, 8:59 p.m. PT. Attend the webinar on Thursday, January 7 from 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. PT to learn about the program from current Associate Fellows Brianna Chatmon, Allison Cruise, Levi Dolan, and Amanda Sawyer.
National Library of Medicine Associate Fellowship Program Overview:

Founding and Future: 50 Years of the NIAAA (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism)

*Phase 3 trial of Novavax investigational COVID-19 vaccine opens

*NIH study uncovers blood vessel damage and inflammation in COVID-19 patients’ brains but no infection

*Peer-reviewed report on Moderna COVID-19 vaccine publishes

Tool Helps Children Cope with Painful Procedures

NIH and Alaska Native leaders identify how to achieve socially responsible genomics research

FYI:

Make Every Bite Count: USDA, HHS Release Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025
Jointly published by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HHS) every five years the guidelines provide science-based recommendations designed to foster healthy dietary patterns for Americans of all ages – from birth through older adults. Importantly, this edition expands the guidance, for the first time including recommended healthy dietary patterns for infants and toddlers. Steeped in scientific evidence, the key recommendations look similar to those of the past and address two topics that garnered much attention throughout the development of the guidelines – added sugars and alcoholic beverages. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025 carried forward the committee’s emphasis on limiting these dietary components, but did not include changes to quantitative recommendations, as there was not a preponderance of evidence in the material the committee reviewed to support specific changes, as required by law. As in previous editions, limited intake of these two food components is encouraged. Learn more about the new guidelines

Survey: The State of Telehealth Services in Indian Country
NIHB is asking for a tribal representative from each of the 574 federally-recognized American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes to complete an online and anonymous survey on the state of primary, behavioral and other telehealth services and capacity in Indian Country. Survey responses will be analyzed into a list of themes and recommendations that will be shared with tribes and stakeholders to help advance efforts in securing resources for improvements to AI/AN telehealth. Deadline is January 16.

Hypertension Resources for Health Professionals
The HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed and compiled several hypertension resources for health professionals, including patient handouts, guidelines and recommendations, training programs and the Hypertension Communications Kit, which includes social media messages, graphics and more.

*COVID-19 Initiatives and Resources
The Office of Minority Health (OMH) has created a new COVID-19 Initiatives and Resources webpage, where you can find information on OMH and HHS initiatives and efforts to address the impact of the pandemic on racial and ethnic minority communities.

*Report: Ten Action Steps to Enhance the Health and Quality of Life of Communities of Color
The Black AIDS Institute, the San Francisco Community Health Center and the Latino Commission on AIDS have published the Final Report of the COVID-19 Virtual Think Tank: Ten Action Steps to Enhance the Health and Quality of Life of Communities of Color across the U.S., which addresses COVID-19, the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative, viral hepatitis and STIs in communities of color.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: January 5, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

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