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News from the Northwest and Beyond
Updated: 1 hour 41 min ago

Coming Soon: NLM PNR Funding Opportunities

Fri, 2020-05-29 17:13

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Northwest Region (NNLM PNR), under cooperative agreement with the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), will soon announce the following funding opportunities:

  • Community Health Award
  • Professional Development Award
  • Technology Improvement Award

Each of these funding opportunities is designed to support the National Library of Medicine’s mission to advance the progress of medicine and improve the public health by:

  • providing all U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information.
  • improving the public’s access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health.

NNLM PNR’s Community Health Award is intended to improve the access and use of quality online health information to support informed decisions about health in underserved communities. A minimum of five awards of up to $12,000 each will be funded.

NNLM PNR’s Professional Development Award supports the continuing education of individuals at NNLM PNR member institutions in order to increase their knowledge, skills and competencies for enhancing health information services to healthcare providers and/or consumers. In person or virtual meetings or conferences are examples of the types of professional development opportunities eligible for these awards. Ten (10) or more awards of up to $1,750 each will be funded. Awards will be available on an ongoing basis until funds are expended.

NNLM PNR’s Technology Improvement Award supports infrastructure that improves equitable access to medical and health information for different user groups, for example health professionals, researchers, library staff or the general public. Six Technology Improvement Awards of up to $5,000 will be made.

Our NNLM Proposal Writing Toolkit contains helpful information and short explanatory videos to guide you through the funding opportunity application process. And as always, your PNR staff stands ready to help answer your questions. Please reach out to us at: nnlm@uw.edu or contact a PNR staff member directly.

Ready to apply? Look for the Community Health Awards, Professional Development Awards and the Technology Improvement Award online application portals to open on or before June 8, 2020.

We look forward to your good ideas!

Categories: RML Blogs

Explore Digital Health Literacy with the NNLM Reading Club

Fri, 2020-05-29 14:30

Much of our healthcare today runs on digital devices. Think telehealth or telemedicine; electronic health record (EHR) or electronic medical record (EMR); mobile health apps (mHealth); emailing your doctor and more. While this connectivity is helpful, healthcare consumers or patients need to have digital health literacy to effectively partner in their health care. There are still gaps in equitable access, and sometimes the reality of our digital health tools falls a bit short of their initial promise. Join with the NNLM Reading Club as we explore Digital Health Literacy this month to learn more about the bits and bytes driving today’s healthcare system. Discover what we need to know to fully participate in this rapidly evolving approach in how we prevent, diagnose and treat illnesses. To select your title and get your book club conversation started, visit the NNLM Reading Club.

Deep Medicine by Eric Topol l The Digital Doctor by Robert Wachter l The Future of Healthcare by Emmanuel Fombu

Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: LitCovid

Thu, 2020-05-28 10:44

There is a new literature search hub that is available for the 2019 novel Coroavirus that was developed as a collaboration between the journal Nature and the US National Institutes of Health’s intramural research programme.

LitCovid is a curated literature hub for tracking up to date scientific information about COVID-19.  Right now, it is the most thorough resource on the subject through providing access to a growing number of relevant articles in PubMed – i.e. about 17,000. Unlike doing the conventional keyword searches for “COVID-19” or “nCOV”, LitCovid has a sophisticated search function that identifies 35% more pertinent articles. As well, the articles are organized by topic as well as by geographic location.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: May 26, 2020

Tue, 2020-05-26 11:41

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

Braving the Elements: PubChem Resources to Weather any Situation: PubChem is the world’s largest collection of freely accessible chemical information. You can use PubChem to search chemicals by name, molecular formula, structure, and other identifiers. And, you can use PubChem to find chemical and physical properties, biological activities, safety and toxicity information, patents, literature citations and more. Join this session of the NNLM Resource Picks on May 27 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Pop the Question: POP THE QUESTION has leveraged the power of community, technology, and social media to facilitate its mission to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS among minority women. The campaign aims to help women learn to “pop the question”, or talk to their partners about HIV/AIDS, and educate them about how to include PrEP and PEP into their regular self-care routines. It includes three phases of digital outreach geared toward African American women, including prevention and treatment using National Library of Medicine resources. June 10 at 8:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Learn how to join the session on the SCR Connections webpage.

*Providing Library Senior Services in a COVID-19 World: While we might not be able to visit our seniors or facilities in-person for the foreseeable future, libraries can reach this population while we shelter in place. During this webinar, please find tips and tricks that David J. Kelsey of the St. Charles (IL) Public Library District (SCPLD) and Glenna Godinsky of the Gail Borden (IL) Public Library District recommend in serving the senior demographic during COVID-19. June 17 at 9:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library: This hands-on class will cover the health information seeking behavior of consumers and the role of the librarian in the provision of health information for the public. Come learn about the evolution of consumer health, health literacy and the e-patient. Participants will leave equipped with knowledge of top consumer health sites. We will discuss creative ideas for health information outreach. July 10 – August 7. (4 MLA CE) Register

Fostering Mutuality: How One Library Prepared for the Opioid Crisis: Kalamazoo is a midsized city in southwest Michigan with a growing number of incidents of opioid usage. Although the issue had yet to have a significant effect on the Kalamazoo Public Library (KPL), some staff wanted to raise awareness and prepare for the possibility of an overdose in the library. Participants will learn how KPL took very proactive steps to educate staff on opioid use, stock anti-overdose at public desks, partner with social service agencies, and advocate for changes in the state laws. July 14 at 9:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

*COVID-19 and Collections Care: This 90-minute FDLP webinar will include background information on the coronavirus and CDC guidelines while introducing participants to recommendations for mitigating risks related to handling and care of collections materials. June 5 from 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. PT. Register

What Should Librarians Know About Differential Privacy and the 2020 Census?: Publishing high quality data while protecting the privacy of respondents are dual mandates for the U.S. Census Bureau. As the result of increasing computing power and access to individual data from third parties, the Bureau is adopting a new algorithm, based on differential privacy, to protect respondent privacy. This FDLP session will cover the new algorithm, its impact on published data, and what librarians should know. June 9 from 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

*Libraries Prepare to Answer Civil Legal Questions in Times of Crisis: This WebJunction webinar explores common civil legal issues associated with times of crisis and provides guidance on ways for public libraries to respond to patron questions. June 11 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

*“Emergency Funding Allows NLM to Expand COVID-19 Research and Services” from the NLM Director’s blog

NLM Associate Fellows 2020-2021

The New and Improved PubMed is Here!

*“Enlisting Monoclonal Antibodies in the Fight Against COVID-19” from the NIH Director’s blog

*Alcohol Treatment and Physical Distancing

NHLBI Big Data Analysis Challenge: Creating New Paradigms for Heart Failure Research

*How Does COVID-19 Affect People with Cancer? NCCAPS Will Help Find Out

View Timeline of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA)

Daily low-dose aspirin does not decrease risk for dementia and cognitive decline

New report on housing needs for an aging population

*Peer-Reviewed Data Shows Remdesivir for COVID-19 Improves Time to Recovery

*Resources from the Disaster Information Management Research Center:

FYI:

*Resources: COVID-19:

Federal Program: USDA Summer Food Program
The USDA Summer Food Service Program offers funding on a per-meal basis to organizations providing meals to low-income children during the summer. Families can use the Summer Meal Site Finder to find local providers, and community organizations that would like to become a Summer Meal Site can contact their state’s USDA Food and Nutrition Service agent.

*COVID-19 Toolkit: Federal Depository Library Program
As Federal depository library staff and patrons are dealing with library closures, virtual work environments, and virtual service environments related to the COVID-19 pandemic, finding all of the information you need, and finding reliable information can be daunting. From this toolkit, you can access:

  • Information for Federal depository library staff on FDLP operations during the pandemic.
  • Reliable U.S. Government information resources for FDLP patrons.
  • Downloadable images you can use for your library website to link patrons to your COVID-19 information pages or research guides.

*Important Call to Action: Notify GPO as Your Library Reopens
Please notify GPO using this form as your library begins to reopen and change operating statuses due to COVID-19. GPO staff members are tracking this information for the purposes of resuming shipments and general communication. This will help us support you and your library effectively and efficiently.

*CDC Coronavirus Disease 2019: Considerations for Institutes of Higher Education
As some institutes of higher education (IHE) open in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers the following considerations for ways in which IHEs can help protect students and employees (e.g., faculty, staff, and administrators) and slow the spread of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

HRSA Study Sets Baseline for Health Outcomes and Behaviors in the Middle Childhood Population
A paper published in Pediatrics by researchers in HRSA’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau provides a broad new profile of health outcomes and behaviors in the middle childhood population. Middle childhood refers to ages 6 through 11. Using data from the combined 2016 and 2017 National Survey of Children’s Health, the researchers examined sociodemographic, health status, family, and neighborhood characteristics of 21,539 U.S. children in this age range.

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: May 19, 2020

Tue, 2020-05-19 11:34

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly

Consumer Health Minute: Mental Health During a Pandemic
Research has shown that social isolation can pose a health risk, pandemic or not. And, now numerous news stories, blogs, and social media have posted about the effects of isolation and its effect on work, at home, and our mental well-being during this current health crisis. You and the communities you serve are also feeling these effects. Here are some resources to assist your patrons and communities to help them through this time of isolation.

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

Braving the Elements: PubChem Resources to Weather any Situation: PubChem is the world’s largest collection of freely accessible chemical information. You can use PubChem to search chemicals by name, molecular formula, structure, and other identifiers. And, you can use PubChem to find chemical and physical properties, biological activities, safety and toxicity information, patents, literature citations and more. Join this session of the NNLM Resource Picks on May 27 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Consumer Health Data Literacy: Join experts from the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center to explore data literacy concepts, the role of libraries and data literacy, examples of reliable health data resources, and resources for facilitating your own data literacy program. This training is introductory and all skill levels are welcome. June 11 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

*Still Searching for One Health: Information Services that Support Prevention of Emerging Zoonotic Disease: We have long known that 75% of emerging diseases begin at the human-animal interface. RNA viruses including HIV, SARS, novel influenza strains and COVID-19 all trace their origins to animal reservoirs and environmental factors. What role can information specialists play in developing sustainable One Health cultures and mindsets at local, regional, national and international levels? Attend this PNR Rendezvous session to learn more. June 17 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

I am … Safe Zone: Gender This!: This is the 8th session of the webinar series, “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Nine Conversations that Matter to Health Sciences Librarians with Jessica Pettitt”. Sex, gender, and sexual orientation become conflated and these misunderstandings are related to sexism, heterosexism, and other forms of oppression. This course contains the clearest model ever. Making changes starts here! July 15 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Chemicals, Drugs, Genetics: Searching PubMed and Beyond Online On Demand: This specialized class will help improve your effectiveness in searching PubMed and related NLM and NIH databases for literature information on chemicals, drugs and genetics. This course assumes a strong working knowledge of PubMed including an understanding of automatic term mapping, the importance of reviewing the Details box after searches, and using the Advanced search page and the MeSH database. (6 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

*Online Reference and the Open Web: Boosting Strategies and Sources: With a pandemic impacting community information needs in a multitude of ways, and with library services shifting increasingly to online formats, it’s time to boost your online reference and curation skills with expert strategies and sources. In this WebJunction webinar, infoDOCKET’s Gary Price will highlight free, quality, open web sources to help you and your patrons answer important questions. May 27 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

*Protecting Privacy in a Pandemic: A Town Hall for Library and Information Workers: Watch this YouTube recording of a town hall hosted by the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee’s Privacy Subcommittee on May 8. Even during a public health emergency, libraries should continue to adhere to their mission and stand by the law and ethical standards that govern the provision of library services. In addition, a resource guide offers links to privacy resources on fair and equitable access, adopting new technologies, minors’ and students’ privacy, and civil liberties.

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“The New and Improved PubMed® Is Here!” from the NLM Director’s blog

Relics of the Infectious Past: Disease Warning Sign Collection

RefSeq release 200 is public

Changing of the Guard: A New Acting Director for NCBI

*“COVID-19 Brings Health Disparities Research to the Forefront” from the NIH Director’s blog

The Research Data Management Workgroup of the NNLM is recruiting Advisory Board members to be part of a committee that reviews and suggests resources for the RD3 web portal. send your name to Mary Piorun at mary.piorun@umassmed.edu by July 1st with a brief narrative (less than 300 words) explaining your interest.

*Recording of webinar on Sharing, Discovering, and Citing COVID-19 Data and Code in Generalist Repositories is now available

Recording Available: Webinar on Publishing Research in the NIH Figshare Instance

Recording Available | Getting the Most Out of DOCLINE

DOCLINE | Milestone: One MILLION Interlibrary Loan Requests

*Resources from the Disaster Information Management Research Center:

FYI:

*Resources: COVID-19:

Easy-to-Understand Telehealth Consent Form
The HHS Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has created a sample telehealth consent form that is easy to understand. The form includes language for healthcare providers that have curtailed in-person visits due to COVID-19. AHRQ has also created how-to guidance for clinicians on how to obtain informed consent for telehealth.

Toolkit: Social Determinants of Health Collections
The NIH National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) and National Human Genome Research Institute have released a new collection of social determinants of health assessments as part of the PhenX Toolkit. This open-access collection contains 19 protocols to help measure upstream factors that shape health behaviors and health outcomes, promote collaborations between researchers and clinicians, and accelerate translational research.

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month
During Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, the HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) celebrates the achievements and contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) in the United States. Throughout the observance in May, OMH will honor the rich culture of AAPIs and promote overall health by encouraging an active and healthy lifestyle, regular doctor visits and better eating habits. For AAPI Heritage Month resources and materials, please visit the OMH website.

*COVID-19, Daily Life and Coping
The CDC provides guidance on a variety of topics to help keep you and those in your community safe and healthy. These topics include shopping and running errands, visiting parks, funeral guidance, coping with stress, pet care and more.

Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: Mental Health During a Pandemic

Tue, 2020-05-19 11:24

Research has shown that social isolation can pose a health risk, pandemic or not. And, now numerous news stories, blogs, and social media have posted about the effects of isolation and its effect on work, at home, and our mental well-being during this current health crisis. You and the communities you serve are also feeling these effects.

Though some states are lifting their stay-at-home restrictions, we will most likely continue to experience various levels of continued social distancing. How can you help? Here are some resources to assist your patrons and communities to help them through this time of isolation.

  • The CDC acknowledges the stress that disease outbreaks can cause individuals and that we all experience this stress differently. Their website provides a more comprehensive approach to mental well-being by including information for parents, for those with pre-existing mental health conditions, and for those at high risk.
  • The National Institute of Mental Health provides a whole host of social media messages regarding COVID-19 and mental health for you to use.  Messages are also available in Spanish.
  • SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) also has their list of resources. You may find the “Tips for Social Distancing, Quarantine, and Isolation During an Infectious Disease Outbreak” and “Coping with Stress During Infectious Disease Outbreaks” most relevant for current needs.  The SAMHSA Disaster Distress Hotline is available 24/7 which provides immediate crises counseling for those experiencing emotional distress during a human or natural crisis.
  • The World Health Organization includes information for parents, if you’re an older adult, and for those who have a mental health condition. Social media messages and posters are readily available.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: May 12, 2020

Tue, 2020-05-12 11:29

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

New PubMed will be the Default for PubMed Access, May 18, 2020
The New PubMed will become the official PubMed on May 18. Unsure of how to navigate? Read more of this blog post to find out more.

Consumer Health Minute: Mental Health During a Pandemic
Research has shown that social isolation can pose a health risk, pandemic or not. And, now numerous news stories, blogs, and social media have posted about the effects of isolation and its effect on work, at home, and our mental well-being during this current health crisis. You and the communities your serve are also feeling these effects. Here are some resources to assist your patrons and communities to help them through this time of isolation.

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

I am … Safe Zones: Sticks and Stones LGBTQA 101: What better sexual identities way to learn about than to list out social norms, stereotypes, media images, rumors, jokes, and slang! This is a safe space for any and all kinds of interactive discussions regarding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Heterosexual identities. Part 7 of the ” Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Nine Conversations that Matter to Health Sciences Librarians with Jessica Pettitt” webinar series. May 13 at 9:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Virtual Programs for Preschoolers: How to encourage wellness, movement & creativity: Are you interested in virtual storytimes, dance parties, and other wellness activities for ages 0-6? This webinar will offer tips & tricks for presenting digitally, partnering with community organizations, and igniting kid’s imagination with wellness-themed programs. May 14 at 9:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Introduction to Mindfulness: Nourishing Ourselves in These Times: In light of the COVID crisis, this Zoom presentation blends learning, participant sharing and brief practices: straw breathing, gentle stretching, guided meditation, silent sit and gratitude. Emphasis is on strengthening our collective immune system and our responsibility (response+ability) to sharpen self-regulation skills in service to the Greater Good. May 27 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Grants and Proposal Writing-On Demand: Designed for beginning grant proposal writers, this class presents a general overview of the grant and funding processes as well as the level of detail required in a successful proposal. (3 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Why am I Irish Yesterday and Italian Today?: Join the live session, hosted by NIH National Human Genome Institute, with a panel of experts. May 13 from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. PT.

The Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) offers free webinars on a variety of topics featuring U.S. Federal information. Below are upcoming sessions in May. All sessions are recorded to view later.

  • Not Just in English Anymore: Locating and Using Government Resources in Other Languages, May 14 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register
  • Introducing Documents Data Miner 3 – The Next Generation FDLP Data Mining and Collection Management Tool, May 20 at 10:00 a.m. PT. Register
  • *Impact of COVID 19 to 2020 Census Operations, May 28 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register

Exploring SRA metadata in the cloud with BigQuery: Learn how to use Google’s BigQuery to quickly search the data from the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) in the cloud to speed up your bioinformatic research and discovery projects. BigQuery is a tool for exploring cloud-based data tables with SQL-like queries. In this webinar, we’ll introduce you to using BigQuery to mine SRA submitter-supplied metadata and the results of taxonomic analysis for SRA runs. You’ll see real-world case studies that demonstrate how to find key information about SRA runs and identify data sets for your own analysis pipelines. May 20 from 9:00 – 9:45 a.m. PT. Register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“Celebrating National Nurses Day: Compassion. Expertise. Trust.” from the NLM Director’s blog

UMLS® 2020AA Release Available

RxNorm April 2020 Release

April 2020 SNOMED CT Spanish Edition Available for Download

National Women’s Health Week, Information to Help Women Advance Their Health and Well-Being

*Dr. Collins coauthors a Science perspective stressing the importance of a coordinated strategy to accelerate multiple COVID-19 vaccine candidates

*“Study Finds Nearly Everyone Who Recovers From COVID-19 Makes Coronavirus Antibodies” from the NIH Director’s blog

*Coordinated Strategy to Accelerate Multiple COVID-19 Vaccine Candidates Is Key, NIH Experts Say

*Resources from the Disaster Information Management Research Center:

FYI:

MLA ’20 vConference Update
The annual Medical Library Association 2020 conference will not be taking place in-person as all large gatherings cancelled through September in Oregon. However, this is an opportunity to participate in a robust and exciting program that your 2020 National Program Committee and MLA team have been designing to plan for this scenario. Take a look at what is being planned and check often.

*Resources: COVID-19:

Hepatitis Awareness Month
May is Hepatitis Awareness Month and May 19 is Hepatitis Testing Day. The CDC has compiled a list of Resources for Hepatitis Awareness Month and Hepatitis Testing Day, including assessment tools, digital badges, social media graphics and radio PSA scripts. The CDC has also developed the Know More Hepatitis Campaign, which encourages all adults to get tested for hepatitis C. To find free, local hepatitis testing services, please utilize the CDC’s GetTested tool.

*Get My Payment Tool
The IRS launched the Get My Payment tool on April 17. This tool will provide you the status of your payment, including the date it is scheduled to be deposited into your bank account or mailed to you. Get additional information on the Economic Stimulus Payment visit IRS.gov/coronavirus.

Older Americans Month
Every May, the Administration for Community Living leads our nation’s observance of Older Americans Month. The theme for 2020 is “Make Your Mark.” This theme was selected to encourage and celebrate countless contributions that older adults make to our communities. This year’s theme highlights the difference everyone can make – in the lives of older adults, in support of caregivers, and to strengthen communities. Visit the Older Americans Month website to find artwork, activity ideas, and other materials to help you observe Older Americans Month. Don’t forget to share your #OAM2020 plans and stories on social media.

Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: Mental Health During a Pandemic

Tue, 2020-05-12 04:00

Research has shown that social isolation can pose a health risk, pandemic or not. And, now numerous news stories, blogs, and social media have posted about the effects of isolation and its effect on work, at home, and our mental well-being during this current health crisis. You and the communities your serve are also feeling these effects.

Though some states are lifting their stay-at-home restrictions, we will most likely continue to experience various levels of continued social distancing. How can you help? Here are some resources to assist your patrons and communities to help them through this time of isolation.

  • The National Institute of Mental Health provides a whole host of social media messages regarding COVID-19 and mental health for you to use.  Messages are also available in Spanish.
  • The World Health Organization includes information for parents, if you’re an older adult, and for those who have a mental health condition. Social media messages and posters are readily available.
  • SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) also has their list of resources. You may find the “Tips for Social Distancing, Quarantine, and Isolation During an Infectious Disease Outbreak” and “Coping with Stress During Infectious Disease Outbreaks” most relevant for current needs.  The SAMHSA Disaster Distress Hotline is available 24/7 which provides immediate crises counseling for those experiencing emotional distress during a human or natural crisis.
  • And of course, the CDC acknowledges the stress that disease outbreaks can cause individuals and that we all experience this stress differently. Their website provides a more comprehensive approach to mental well-being by including information for parents, for those with pre-existing mental health conditions, and for those at high risk.
Categories: RML Blogs

New PubMed will be the Default for PubMed Access, May 18, 2020

Mon, 2020-05-11 18:05

The new PubMed will be the default for PubMed on or after May 18, 2020 (NLM Technical Bulletin, 16 April 2020).

The legacy PubMed homepage is displaying a banner to alert users of the change, and direct users to the New PubMed Transition FAQs.

Legacy PubMed homepage, including the banner alert "The new PubMed site will become the default in mid-May."

NLM and NNLM have many resources to help PubMed users learn about the new PubMed.

If you’re a PubMed superuser:

  • Register for NNLM’s “How PubMed Works” webinar series. The series includes 4, 1.5 hour webinars: Introduction, MeSH, ATM, and Selection.
  • Check out additional resources on NLM’s PubMed Online Training site. The site collects recorded webinars, handouts, and more.

If you teach PubMed:

  • Explore NLM’s PubMed Trainer’s Toolkit. This toolkit includes slide decks, handouts, and “quick tour” tutorials. The tutorials can be imported into your institution’s learning management system.

If you’re new to PubMed:

  • Enroll in PubMed Essentials. This on-demand course, offered through Moodle, will provide you with information to get started using PubMed.

Have you created LibGuides, handouts, or sample searches for PubMed instruction? Share links and ideas in the comments section!

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: May 5, 2020

Tue, 2020-05-05 11:37

Welcome to the new format of the PNR Weekly Digest. The Weekly Digest is a compilation of news and information from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, professional development opportunities, and other items of interest for the Pacific Northwest Region. We hope you find the information useful for you and those you serve.

The Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) offers regional programs, funding, and training to improve access to health information, increase community engagement about health, expand professional knowledge, and support outreach. The NNLM PNR invites you to participate in a regional needs assessment via this survey. The insights you provide in our survey will help to shape NNLM PNR programs going forward. 

 

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

Read All About It: May is Mental Health Month
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought widespread stress and uncertainty which may take a toll on our mental health. What an appropriate time to recognize May as Mental Health Month. The NNLM Reading Club features three books to spark a book club discussion on different facets of mental health…read the full post

Professional Development:

NNLM Educational Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

I am … Safe Zones: Sticks and Stones LGBTQA 101: What better sexual identities way to learn about than to list out social norms, stereotypes, media images, rumors, jokes, and slang! This is a safe space for any and all kinds of interactive discussions regarding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Heterosexual identities. Part 7 of the ” Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Nine Conversations that Matter to Health Sciences Librarians with Jessica Pettitt” webinar series. May 13 at 9:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Braving the Elements: PubChem Resources to Weather any Situation: PubChem is the world’s largest collection of freely accessible chemical information. You can use PubChem to search chemicals by name, molecular formula, structure, and other identifiers. And, you can use PubChem to find chemical and physical properties, biological activities, safety and toxicity information, patents, literature citations and more. Join this session of the NNLM Resource Picks on May 27 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Health and Wellness @ the Library: The Essentials of Providing Consumer Health Services: Centered around eight core competencies, this interactive 4-week online course provides a rich learning experience to build all the essential skills for providing consumer health information services. Obtain the MLA Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) by taking this class. August 3 – 28. (12 MLA CE) Register

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-based public health for CHES CECH: This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. This is a registration page for Certified Health Education Specialists to receive continuing education credit for viewing the recording of the NNLM class From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-based public health, which took place on February 26, 2020. This recording will be available for CHES CECH through August 26, 2020. After registering, you will receive an enrollment code via e-mail and a link to the recording. After viewing the course recording, you will be asked to complete a quiz based on the course content. (1 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Overview of COVID-19 and CDC’s Response to the Pandemic with a Highlight of Federal COVID-19 Resources: This FDLP Academy webinar will provide information on the CDC’s Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic. May 5 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register

Navigating Benefits.gov: A Resource for Community Advocates: During this FDLP Academy  webinar, attendees will learn how to navigate Benefits.gov and its many resources. Representatives from Benefits.gov will provide a tutorial of the Benefit Finder questionnaire, the newsroom, help center, and continuously developing COVID-19 resources. May 11 at 10:00 a.m. PT. Register

New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians 2020: New England Science Bootcamp for Librarians will host a free virtual conference on June 11, 2020, from 6:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. PT. Topics may include, depending on speaker availability:

  • Vaccine research & manufacture
  • Virology
  • Making Health Devices in non-industrial settings
  • IRB and human subjects research in the shifting landscape

Learn more and register for this conference

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

*COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. 

Check out the May issue of NIH News in Health with articles covering concussions, vaping, social isolation and more

*“Rising to the COVID-19 Challenge: Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx)”, from the NIH Director’s blog

*NIH mobilizes national innovation initiative for COVID-19 diagnostics

*NIH clinical trial shows Remdesivir accelerates recovery from advanced COVID-19

* Honoring Health — What Your Community Needs To Know About COVID-19 — April 2020

Learn about over-the-counter hearing aids, which will be available soon

New study links severe sleep apnea to higher blood glucose levels in African Americans

NIDA launches drug education booklet series for middle school students

*Shareable Resources on Coping with COVID-19

*Resources from the Disaster Information Management Research Center:

FYI:

*Resources: COVID-19:

Telehealth: Health Care from the Safety of our Homes
The HHS Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is encouraging healthcare practitioners to integrate telemedicine into their practice. As part of this effort, HRSA has launched telehealth.hhs.gov as a resource for both healthcare providers and patients. It provides helpful information about telemedicine and links to tools and resources for practitioners.

*53% of Americans Say the Internet Has Been Essential During the COVID-19 Outbreak
The coronavirus outbreak has driven many commercial and social activities online and for some the internet has become an ever more crucial link to those they love and the things they need. As Americans turn to the internet for critical purposes, there are rekindled debates about how the digital divide – that is, the gap between those who do or do not have access to technology – may hinder people’s ability to complete everyday tasks or even schoolwork. Learn more about this new Pew Research Center survey conducted in early April

*Helpful Questions and Answers about Coronavirus (COVID-19) and Your Pets
FDA offers some helpful questions and answers about keeping your pets safe during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

National Prevention Week May 10 – 16, 2020
SAMHSA’s National Prevention Week (NPW) is a public education platform that promotes prevention year-round through providing ideas, capacity-building, tools, and resources to help individuals and communities make substance use prevention happen every day. NPW culminates in May by recognizing the important work that communities have done throughout the year to inspire action and prevent substance use and mental disorders. Each day this week, SAMHSA will focus on a specific health theme related to prevention. SAMHSA provides free publications, tip sheets, and resource centers for each of the 2020 daily themes to educate and discuss in your community. Check out the Planning Toolkit (available in English and Spanish) for templates, tools, and support for organizing your own prevention events and activities.

Categories: RML Blogs

Read All About It: May is Mental Health Month

Thu, 2020-04-30 21:00

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought widespread stress and uncertainty which may take a toll on our mental health. What an appropriate time to recognize May as Mental Health Month. The NNLM Reading Club features three books to spark a book club discussion on different facets of mental health. On our Mental Health Resources page, you’ll find downloadable materials and program ideas to help educate and reduce the stigma often associated with mental health disorders. To learn more, visit the NNLM Reading Club. Choose a book, share the information, and start the conversation.

Little Panic by Amanda Stern l Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb l Hidden Valley Road by Robert Kolker

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: April 28, 2020

Tue, 2020-04-28 12:25

The NNLM PNR, in coordination with Washington School Research Associates (WSRA), is conducting a regional needs assessment via SurveyGizmo. Please consider taking our survey when you receive the survey link via email. The insights you provide will help to shape the nature of our partnerships and focus of our work going forward. The survey will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete and must be completed in one sitting. Thank you for participating in this important process of ongoing improvement!

 

[Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *]

In the Dragonfly:

Citizen Science & Alzheimer’s Disease
Stall Catchers is an easy online game developed to help accelerate Alzheimer’s research. The game was created by the scientists at Cornell University to support their EyesOnAlz research project. Learn more about the game and how to participate in this project on the blog

DataFlash: New and Free Virtual Science Conference in June 2020
We are pleased to announce that New England Science Bootcamp for Librarians will host a FREE virtual conference on June 11, 2020, from 6 A.M. – 1 P.M. PT. Learn more about this event and how to attend on the blog post

 

Educational Opportunities:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

What’s All This Talk About Citizen Science?: Darlene Cavalier, founder of SciStarter, author of “The Field Guide to Citizen Science” and Principal Investigator (PI) of multiple programs catalyzing citizen science in libraries and around the globe, will guide you as you discover what citizen science is, who is and isn’t engaged, how libraries can be community hubs for citizen science, and where the field may go in the future. Her introduction will be followed by two high school teachers from The Dalles, Oregon, who will share their experience working with students on the SciStarter/NLM citizen science projects. Don’t miss out on a unique opportunity to learn about the buzz surrounding citizen science and how your library can facilitate citizen science in your community! April 29 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

How PubMed®Works: How PubMed Works is a series of four 90-minute classes presented via WebEx. The individual classes are:

  • How PubMed Works: Introduction
  • How PubMed Works: Selection
  • How PubMed Works: MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)
  • How PubMed Works: ATM (Automatic Term Mapping)

Classes are scheduled in May and June. Register for each separate session. (1.5 MLA CE for each session).

Dementia Awareness for Public Libraries: This interactive presentation will introduce library staff to the National Library of Medicine resources, enhance understanding of the public library’s role in supporting families living with dementia, and present an opportunity to contribute to our understanding of the disease by participating in the All of Us Research Program. April 29 from 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. PT. Register

Wellness in the Library Workplace: You’re a library worker. You’re already helping those in your community find health information. As a library worker, what are you doing to manage your own well-being? Join us to discover ways to improve your own personal well-being and create a healthy workplace. August 3 – 16. (4 MLA CE) Register

From Beyond our Borders: Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information: This class is designed to assist librarians and others who work with diverse populations in locating health information. The resources presented are selected for their emphasis on providing culturally relevant information in the preferred language of the population. Background information on refugees and immigrants in the U.S. and their unique health issues will be presented. The class will be taught via Moodle and includes short readings, videos, and activities. August 28 – September 25. (4 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

COVID-19 and Health Equity: Exploring Disparities and Long-Term Health Impacts: The National Academy of Medicine and the American Public Health Association are exploring the state of the science surrounding the current outbreak of COVID-19 in the United States and globally, with a focus on the emerging evidence on how to best mitigate its impact through the webinar series, COVID-19 Conversations. The sixth COVID-19 Conversations webinar will explore the disproportionate impact COVID-19 is having on minority communities, what we can learn from past pandemics in how to provide equitable care to all, and what we can do now to ensure that all communities receive the care they need. April 29 from 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. PT. Register and view recordings of past webinars in this series

How Climate Changes Health and Why You Should Care: Join this live NIH webcast with speaker John Balbus, Director, NIEHS-WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Sciences on Wednesday, May 6 from 8:00 a.m. – Noon. Register

 

From the National Library of Medicine / National Institutes of Health:

“Profiles in Science: Exploring Stories of Scientific Discovery”, from the NLM Director’s blog

The World’s First Public Health Emergency of International Concern

The Public Library Association (PLA), National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) and the All of Us Research Program have partnered together to create free resources for library staff to support their community’s digital literacy needs.

*“The Challenge of Tracking COVID-19’s Stealthy Spread”, from the NIH Director’s blog

*Expert U.S. panel develops NIH treatment guidelines for COVID-19

*Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Treatment Guidelines

*NIH begins study to quantify undetected cases of coronavirus infection

Diet may help preserve cognitive function

*Digital Mental Health: Innovating in a Time of High Anxiety

Infant Temperament Predicts Personality More Than 20 Years Later

*Resources from the Disaster Information Management Research Center:

 

FYI:

*Resources: COVID-19

 *American Psychiatric Association (APA) Coronavirus Resources
To provide support in the response to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), APA is collecting authoritative and timely resources in this information hub. Included are resources for families, psychiatrists, community leaders and others.

Report: Healthy Eating Research Nutrition Guidelines for the Charitable Food System
This report, prepared by Healthy Eating Research, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, presents recommendations for evidence-based nutrition guidelines tailored to the unique needs and capacity of the charitable food system. The intent of these recommendations is to improve the quality of foods in food banks and pantries in order to increase access to and promote healthier food choices

Survey: National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health
The 2019 National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health is a nationwide survey conducted by Data Across Sectors for Health on behalf of All In: Data for Community Health. The National Inventory is focused on better understanding the location and nature of multi-sector collaborations in the U.S., their capacity to systematically share data to improve community health outcomes and how these collaborations progress over time. Results from the survey will be summarized in a report and made available in an online directory and map.

Categories: RML Blogs

Citizen Science & Alzheimer’s Disease

Sun, 2020-04-26 21:00

Stall Catchers is an easy online game developed to help accelerate Alzheimer’s research. The game was created by the scientists at Cornell University to support their EyesOnAlz research project. According to the SciStarter.org project description, Stall Catchers focuses on one aspect of Alzheimer’s Disease: reduced blood flow in the brain. This symptom of Alzheimer’s has been known about for years, but, until now, nobody knew why reduced blood flow happens in the brain. Scientists are now finding a connection between blood flow and memory and they are testing that connection by inviting ordinary people to help by playing a simple game called Stall Catchers. When blood flow is stuck, the scientists call that a “stall” thus the name of the game, “Stall Catchers.”

How does it work? Stall Catchers’ participants watch videos of mice brains and “catch” blood flow stalls. Not a neuroscientist or animal biologist? No worries, participants are taught how to score blood vessels as “flowing” or “stalled.” Responses are shared with the EyesOnAlz scientists who use this data to help them fully understand how stalls are contributing to Alzheimer’s. The goal is to use this knowledge to uncover potential treatment targets in the brain. To play, participants, need a Smartphone (or computer) and an internet connection. This citizen science project is important, easy and fun!

So, who’s ready to advance scientific discovery from the comfort of their living room and help Alzheimer’s research?  Stall Catchers, that’s who!

Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: New and Free Virtual Science Conference in June 2020

Thu, 2020-04-23 10:13

We are pleased to announce that New England Science Bootcamp for Librarians will host a FREE virtual conference on June 11, 2020, from 6 A.M. – 1 P.M. PT | 9am – 4pm (US Eastern Time).

Topics will probably include, depending on speaker availability:

  • Vaccine research & manufacture
  • Virology
  • Making Health Devices in non-industrial settings
  • IRB and human subjects research  in the shifting landscape

Tentative Schedule

  • 9-10am                Session A
  • 10:15-10:45      Interstitial – Front Lines Stories
  • 11-12                    Session B
  • 12-1                      Lunch
  • 1-2                         Session C
  • 2:15-2:45            Interstitial – Front Lines Stories
  • 3-4                         Session D

The schedule of topics will be finalized and sent to all registrants soon.

This conference will run throughout the day, with access via a single link for the whole day that attendees will receive after registering. You may tune in as you have time or for the topics that interest you the most. More information and a detailed schedule will be available closer to the date of the event. Please register to get the most updated information sent to you.

Registration is available at https://forms.gle/whfu1H9nY2e8X3gS9

NER looks forward to seeing you online for a fun and informative conference! While NER had to cancel their in-person conference this year, they hope you will take advantage of this free professional development opportunity. While this conference is being organized in New England, they welcome attendance for anyone and anywhere.

Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: New Webinar on Sharing, Discovering, and Citing COVID-19 Data and Code in Generalist Repositories

Tue, 2020-04-21 12:47

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the National Institutes of Health is hosting a free webinar for researchers to learn how to share, discover, and cite COVID-19 data and code in generalist repositories on Friday, April 24 from 11:00 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. PT.

The biomedical research community’s understanding of the novel coronavirus and the associated coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is rapidly evolving. Open science and the timely sharing of research data have played a critical role in advancing our understanding of COVID-19 and accelerating the pace of discovery.

Researchers will have an opportunity to hear from multiple generalist repositories about the ways each repository is supporting discoverability and reusability of COVID-19 data and associated code. The NLM will also provide an overview of available COVID-19 literature.

The webinar will be available via NIH VideoCast.

Instructions on submitting questions will be made available closer to the webinar. Interested participants are encouraged to bookmark this page for the latest updates and follow #NIHdata on Twitter.  The webinar will be recorded and available a week after the live event.

See the agenda on the ODSS website.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Library Week Spotlight: Molly Montgomery

Mon, 2020-04-20 05:00

In honor of National Library Week, PNR asked Molly Montgomery, Director of Library Services at the Idaho College of Osteopathic Medicine, to reflect on her career and current work at ICOM. 

Hello, everyone! My name is Molly Montgomery and I am the Director of Library Services at the Idaho College of Osteopathic Medicine (ICOM). 

Molly Montgomery in front of a conference poster.I received a dual master’s in Library Science and Health Studies from Texas Woman’s University, we’ll just say, a number of years ago! It was a program specifically created for those of us who wanted to go into health librarianship which is exactly what I was looking for. I spent the first part of my career working in special library settings. I worked as a librarian for the American Heart Association and then as a hospital librarian for a large health care system in Dallas. I then moved into academic librarianship as the health sciences librarian at Idaho State University, and I’ve been at ICOM for just over two years. 

Making the transition from working in special libraries to academic libraries was definitely challenging for a number of reasons (so. many. committee. meetings & so. much. teaching), but I have enjoyed the experience. It has been rewarding to help shepherd the next generation of health care providers through what can be a very grueling time in their lives. 

One of the primary accomplishments of my career so far has been building the ICOM library from the ground up. ICOM is a new school (we are still two years away from graduating our first class) and I was hired just 4.5 months before the start of our inaugural class. I spent most of that time in a semi-state of panic and stress about everything that had to be decided on and implemented. What ILS to use?  What about interlibrary loan? Gotta build a website. What databases are the highest priority? Don’t forget strategic plans and policies! I survived largely thanks to the amazing and supportive medical librarian community. Librarians near and far took time to answer my emails and phone calls about every aspect of what it takes to run a library. Thank you if you were one of the many people who came to my rescue! 

Photo of Molly Montgomery, hiking.

Now that things are somewhat settled, I’ve been able to get back to focusing on my professional interests which include social determinants of health, health equity, and pretty much everything related to evidence-based medicine. I spend way too much time reading articles on these topics, but there is always something new to learn. 

Away from work, you’ll find me hiking or snowshoeing or otherwise enjoying the great outdoors. I’m participating in the 52 Hike Challenge this year, so you may see me on a trail near you this summer! I am also a huge fan of board games like Carcassone, Ticket to Ride, Castle Panic, King of New York, and my current obsession, Wingspan. 

I’m somewhat active on Twitter, so feel free to find me there @MedLibMolly.

Categories: RML Blogs

This Citizen Science Project Wants Your Dirt 

Mon, 2020-04-20 03:00

“Wouldn’t it be amazing if the cure for cancer is literally in our back yard?” asks Kathy M., a citizen scientist from Fort Myers, Florida. Through the University of Oklahoma’s What’s in Your Backyard?: Citizen Science Soil Collection Program, this could be possible.

Fungi, used many antibiotics and other medicines, is found in soil. Researchers need new fungi to create new medicine.

What's in your Backyard citizen science kit. Includes a scoop, instructions for participating, and two plastic bags

The What’s in Your Backyard program asks you to send a sample of your soil to researchers at the University of Oklahoma. One small sample of soil could include dozens of fungi. This means you could have fungi in your soil that leads to groundbreaking (ha!) new medicine.

So, I had to try it.

I requested a kit through the What’s in Your Backyard website, and received the kit in the mail 2 weeks later. The kit includes a small scoop, a plastic bag for the sample, an additional ziplock bag, clear instructions for collecting the soil sample, and a form to fill out with information about the sample.

The soil sample needs to be taken from an area of your yard doesn’t get a lot of traffic, isn’t carefully tended, and is free from chemical or biological hazards. Once I found just the spot, I followed the instructions for collecting the sample.

hand holding a soil sample

Next, I filled out the form included in the kit and sent the form and soil sample to the University of Oklahoma. Join me in following the progress of my soil sample by tracking sample #120673 on the project’s website.

What’s in Your Backyard is a simple project for all ages and is an excellent opportunity to learn and stay curious from home. The project website provides many fascinating resources, including; a behind the scenes look at the process for testing the soil samples, curriculum guides, fantastic fungi facts, and more.

It’s free to participate in this project. The University of Oklahoma accepts donations to cover the cost of the kit.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Digital Literacy and Health: Free Resources for Libraries

Fri, 2020-04-17 12:19
In a time where we rely so heavily on digital connectivity, how can we ensure that library communities have the support they need to stay connected?

The Public Library Association (PLA), National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) and the All of Us Research Program (All of Us) have partnered together to create free resources for library staff to support their community’s digital literacy needs. Resources include a curriculum guide for library staff to teach digital literacy by using health topics and a series of online modules designed to teach basic Internet skills. Available in English and Spanish, the modules are designed to help new internet users navigate the online world.

Learn more about why digital literacy is so important to health, participate in virtual trainings, access free resources to help your library support digital health literacy, and promote your digital literacy training sessions to individuals in your community in partnership with NNLM and All of Us.

Visit nnlm.gov/allofus/digitalhealthliteracy to access these resources and opportunities and more!

Looking for more ways to engage your community around digital literacy?

Try promoting citizen science as a way for your community to practice digital literacy skills, learn about factors that impact health, and contribute meaningful data to scientific research!

To get started, check out our online course “Introduction to Citizen Science,” a free, online class developed in partnership with SciStarter. This course is for any member of the public who is interested in learning about citizen science and how they can participate in citizen science activities both online and in-person.

Visit scistarter.org/nlm to access citizen science resources.

NNLM invites you to learn and share innovative ways to continue supporting the digital literacy needs of your communities with your colleagues in the NNLM network.

These opportunities have been brought to you in partnership with All of Us, a national research program seeking one million or more people from across the United States to help speed up medical research. Learn more about All of Us at joinallofus.org/internetskills.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Free Citizen Science Kits: Test the Waters

Thu, 2020-04-16 15:54

In collaboration with Cornerstones of Science, NNLM is offering a new resource to public libraries to help library staff support citizen science outreach efforts in local communities through a fun, accessible and loanable kit for families. The Test The Waters Family Exploration Kit  is available now during Citizen Science month (April 2020). Within each kit are four family-friendly citizen science water-themed activities and all the instructions and materials needed to conduct each activity.

The kits are shipped free to the first 500 requesting libraries. They come in a lockable plastic tote and can fit on a typical library shelf. If your library is closed, no worries – you can specify when it ships. That said, kits must be requested by April 30, 2020. To request your kit, click here.

The collaboration with Cornerstones of Science is part of NNLM’s partnership with the NIH All of Us Research Program which seeks to shine a light on citizen science as a means to connect people with research that has real-world impact.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Flu Near You: “Spread the word.  Not the flu”

Mon, 2020-04-13 11:03

The flu is a worrisome illness that kills thousands in the United States annually.  Have you ever wondered how bad an influenza-like sickness, like the flu, is spreading in your respective community?  Well, the citizen science project “Flu Near You” helps to answer that question while at the same time it is a preventative measure that could prepare you to help prevent the next pandemic.

The idea behind Flu Near You was conceived by epidemiologists from both Harvard University and Boston Children’s Hospital.  Flu Near You leverages the power of the crowd to provide real-time information about flu-like-illness in your respective living or working areas.  Basically, anybody can participate in tracking flu-like-illnesses in your area.

This is how Flu Near You works.  All you need is internet access and a smartphone or computer.  On their SciStarter project page or on their own project page, participants are asked to complete a quick, like 30 seconds maximum, weekly survey to share whether you feel healthy or sick.  Participation is voluntary and your individual report is treated confidentially.

At the end of your data collection, you are given a health dashboard of your community that shows how well your community and neighboring ones are doing flu-wise.  The following health dashboard shows the health of my community in Seattle as of Friday, April 10th, 2020, noon PT.

So, what happens with your data?  Scientists will use your data, along with thousands of other reports, to generate local and national maps of influenza-like illness. This important crowd-sourced information provides public health officials and researchers with real-time, anonymous information that could help prevent the next pandemic.

Participating in a Flu Near You can help keep our communities healthy and strong!

Categories: RML Blogs

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