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Serving the biomedical information needs of Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Utah, and Wyoming.
Updated: 3 hours 12 min ago

NNLM Redraws Its Map

Wed, 2021-04-21 18:08

Map of New NNLM RegionsNetwork of the National Library of Medicine members who are used to working with the MidContinental Region – particularly those in Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri – will see shifts in their service contacts as the network redraws its map and enters a new five-year funding cycle in May.

Members will still find themselves with plenty of support from NNLM after the change. Access to National Library of Medicine resources like PubMed and MedlinePlus will not be affected.

NLM, part of the National Institutes of Health, will enter into new agreements with the academic health sciences libraries throughout the country that serve as Regional Medical Libraries for NNLM. Seven RMLs will serve more than 8,000 NNLM member libraries and organizations across the country beginning in May, consolidated from eight under the previous arrangement.

“Professional, knowledgeable staff will remain a core part of NNLM’s service to libraries in all the regions,” said John Bramble, associate director for the MidContinental Region. “The faces, names and email addresses of your points of contact may change depending on where you are located.”

The University of Utah’s Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library has served as the RML for the MidContinental Region since 2001 will continue in that role in a new Region 4 through 2026.

Three states from the current MidContinental Region – namely, Utah, Wyoming and Colorado – will be merged with New Mexico, Arizona, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota to form Region 4. Meanwhile, the states of Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri will be moved from the MidContinental Region into a new Region 3 with Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas and Louisiana.

NNLM will continue to offer its members funding for health information access and other projects related to the improvement of public health, as well as professional training, opportunities to connect with health sciences libraries and health-related information centers in each region, and access to free educational and print materials including NLM traveling exhibitions.

NNLM’s main goals are to work through libraries and other members to support a highly trained workforce for biomedical and health information resources and data, improve health literacy, and increase health equity through information. Through meaningful engagement strategies the NNLM increases health information access and use for all audiences, including underrepresented populations.

The reorganization reconfigures regions and reduces disparities between regions in two ways – total population served and number of member libraries and organizations supported.

The NNLM design remains the same with this FOA, comprising grantee staff operating RMLs, national offices, and national centers. RMLs remain an integral component of NNLM that serve as regional hubs for Network members; assess, interpret, and reflect all community information needs in the region; develop, foster, and maintain relationships between and among NNLM and members in the region; and reach all communities in the U.S.

For 2021-2026, the current NNLM Evaluation Office is transformed into a new, separate NNLM Evaluation Center that brings more expertise, innovation, and focus to analyzing and reporting the effectiveness, value, and impact of the Network’s regional and national programs and activities. The change also allows NNLM to strengthen its evaluation program and encourage innovation.

For more information please see the Announcement.

The post NNLM Redraws Its Map first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

On being a Catalyst for Community Health

Tue, 2021-04-20 17:55

Melanie Newell is a C4CH (Catalyst for Community Health) Grantee at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and is a service associate in Lincoln City Libraries, in Lincoln, NE.

C4CH (Catalysts for Community Health) is an Institute of Museum and Library Services Community Catalyst Project Grant initiative led by Dr. Jenny Bossaller and Dr. Denice Adkins of the University of Missouri’s iSchool, and Deborah Ward and Christine Pryor of MU Libraries and supported by an advisory board and one amazing graduate assistant. C4CH endeavors to use the talents of emerging LAM professionals to “spark” change in communities by bringing together existing ideas, energies, pieces and structures that when combined strengthen their impacts on communities. The support that we have is unmatched and allows us to make significant strides in our communities. I am so pleased to have the opportunity to brag about it here!

Now that I am in my fourth semester of this unique program, I can’t imagine my library education without this special training and emphasis on community health, and yet I know that few of my peers are going to have the perspective of community health in their library career paths. This initiative makes me feel like a seed that is being planted in my community. Our specialized training has included emphasis on evaluating our communities for areas of high need in relation to health, health literacy, and access to health and healthcare. We have learned how to use consumer health resources to help with health-related reference questions in libraries, how medical libraries are supporting public libraries and health initiatives across the country, and how public libraries can tap into these resources.  The skills I’ve obtained are not widespread in the public libraries I’ve been affiliated with so far, and I can be a new proponent for this type of library service. I am walking a not well-trodden path, which comes with some level of challenge and uncertainty, but I’ve been able to do it with the network of support that has been set up by the grant. In orienting us toward community health, all our training is moving through the community health filter, resulting in outcomes that are affecting our local libraries and communities.  Our projects and papers directly serve our local communities.

For me, it was when in our reference course, and learning about “information encountering” and serendipitous learning that happens in libraries that I began my journey into the project I’m doing for C4CH.  I realized that the serendipitous encountering of information can have a major influence on people’s knowledge and lives.  What if people in libraries encountered more health information unexpectedly?  What if they were at the library to get a bus schedule, but picked up a pamphlet on infant choking that saves the life of a baby?  Or they see information on quitting smoking and learn about the local Quitline, enhancing their chances of success .  I immediately knew I wanted to get more printed health information into people’s hands through libraries.  When I started doing more research, I realized I was on the right track, as health information produced by libraries is much more likely to be at the right literacy level and in more languages than health information coming from doctors’ offices. From there, as a component of my C4CH education experience, I was connected to my mentor, Margie Sheppard, of the NNLM MCR. We came up with the idea of creating a tool-kit for public libraries to access and print health information for their patrons.  I am working to localize this tool-kit to include local and community resources unique to the locale of Nebraska libraries and Nebraska communities.

Nebraskans tend to like things that are by and for other Nebraskans.  That’s our culture around here; we take real pride in our independent achievements. That is why the tool-kit taps into local health departments, organizations and local medical librarians.  I also know that one barrier to offering health programs and resources in libraries is the time it takes for library staff to learn these skills. That is why the tool-kit I’m creating is designed to be catchy, quick, attractive and accessible.  It is intended to consolidate information in such a way that it doesn’t waste any of the precious time of the busy librarians in my state.  It is my hope that by localizing information and resources on how to provide printed health materials in libraries and framing it in a way that is by and for Nebraskans, it will expand the landscape of printed health materials and encourage librarians to take new stock in health promotion in the public libraries right here in my locale, the great state of Nebraska.

The post On being a Catalyst for Community Health first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Important information about your NNLM.gov Profile – Take action by April 30th!

Mon, 2021-04-19 18:19

Due to upcoming system upgrades on nnlm.gov, your current transcript of NNLM classes will not be available after Friday, April 30th, 2021. Your NNLM Class Transcript lists all NNLM classes you have registered for since December 2016. If you want to keep a copy of the classes you’ve taken over the past 5 years, follow these steps to download a copy:

Log into your nnlm.gov account (bottom right of page)

Scroll down to ‘My Profile’ (bottom right of page)

Click ’View Profile’

Print or save the webpage, or copy and paste it into an editing software of your choice.

Again, you will no longer be able to access your NNLM class history after Friday, April 30th. Please take action before April 30th if you wish to keep a personal copy.

The post Important information about your NNLM.gov Profile – Take action by April 30th! first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Training Program is Taking a Short Pause

Mon, 2021-04-19 18:18

The NNLM training program is taking a short pause this April/May. Critical system upgrades will allow the NNLM to continue offering the free, high quality training you have come to know and love.

How will this affect you? NNLM class registration and access will be unavailable starting April 16, 2021. Class offerings will incrementally re-open starting in May, and will continue throughout the summer.

How can you continue to connect with NNLM during this break? You can subscribe to the NNLM YouTube Channel. There are a multitude of previously recorded classes, many of which are available for MLA CE credit.

Contact nto@utah.edu with questions, and see you again soon!

The post NNLM Training Program is Taking a Short Pause first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey

Fri, 2021-04-09 11:52

In this post, Paula Mozen, Director of the documentary LIFE INTERRUPTED, shares  the story of her journey with this film about the experiences of three breast cancer survivors. Portions of the original post have been edited for clarity.

I was a documentary filmmaker long before I became a breast cancer survivor. When I was first diagnosed, I wanted to take care of my situation and move on. The last thing I wanted to do was to make a film about it, a project that I knew would take several years to fundraise and complete. As time passed and I gained perspective on my own situation, I realized I was NOT alone; there are hundreds of thousands of us out here. In the United States, 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2021, an estimated 330,000 new cases will be diagnosed.

Breast Cancer is indeed an epidemic. It can be found across all age, gender, socio-economic, ethnic, and geographic groups. It does not discriminate; however, as we know, access to quality healthcare can be very discriminatory.

MSU photo by Kelly Gorham

Holding these truths together plus having the inside track to my own experience, I decided to make the film I wish I could have seen when I was diagnosed – both times. I wanted LIFE INTERRUPTED to put a face to the statistics and tell meaningful stories in order to inspire change.

Breast cancer patients are often asked to make their own choices in terms of treatments available. The moment the diagnosis is received, each person must gather information and make life-altering decisions under extreme emotional duress, all in a relatively short period of time. While individual circumstances are unique, hearing about the personal journeys from articulate women who have traveled this road before is invaluable for navigating treatments and keeping hope alive. Knowledge is power; the successful prevention and treatment of breast cancer depends on this.

Persistence is a common theme for indie filmmakers and breast cancer survivors alike. Just when you think you are finished, there is usually another mountain to climb.

From Berkeley to Berlin to Beirut and back to Bozeman, MY LIFE INTERRUPTED was screened, was reviewed, and won several awards at festivals. After these events, I wanted to connect directly with audiences who cared about the themes and issues the film covered, including healthcare advocates, providers, and survivors. My hope was to provide empowerment for survivors to be self-advocates  and to share with family members, advocates and healthcare providers what it truly means to survive breast cancer.

I learned about the All of Us Research Program (http://joinallofus.org/nlm) and partnership with NNLM through Julie Sherwood, the Partnership & Community Engagement Manager for the Wichita Public Library. After a series of emails, a partnership was formed that would involve collaborations with NNLM staff from throughout the organization, including Brittney Thomas, Brian Leaf, Linda Loi, Darlene Kaskie, Michele Spatz, George Strawley, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Richard McLean, Helen Spielbauer, Rachel Maller, Holly Stevenson, Laura Bartlett, and Frost Keaton.

Beginning March 3rd through April 15th, NNLM and I look forward to presenting the LIFE INTERRUPTED Virtual Screening Series which includes live interactive panel discussions in partnership with The Black Women’s Health Imperative, The Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS), Asian Health Coalition, Henry Ford Health System, Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library.

During the panel discussions, hear from medical or research professionals who specialize in breast cancer, breast cancer survivors, and advocates who represent populations historically underrepresented in medical research. Panelists will share their experiences and knowledge on diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer, living with breast cancer, advancing treatments and cures for breast cancer, and advocating for precision medicine and diversity of medical research through programs like All of Us.

It has been an absolute honor and pleasure to work with the entire team so far, a group of talented, motivated and detail-oriented individuals who are dedicated to creating the best possible audience user experience. Everyone is focused on making each event engaging, interactive, relevant and accessible. To work with a team like this is – well – a filmmaker’s dream come true; we are all on the same page, doing the right thing for the right reasons, all to empower patients and share meaningful stories.

Thank you to Paula Mozen for the work she is doing and for contributing to this blog post. We look forward to seeing the great things that come from this project.

Below are all the upcoming free virtual screenings and LIVE Q&A panel discussions. For more information or to attend any of these upcoming events, visit watch.eventive.org/lifeinterrupted.

Free Virtual Screenings  continues through April 15.

LIVE Q&A Panel Discussions

Monday, April 15 at 2 pm MT presented by Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library

For more information on the film LIFE INTERRUPTED and to sign up for the free screening, click here: https://watch.eventive.org/lifeinterrupted. .

Remember to follow the NNLM MCR on Twitter.

 

The post Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Goddard Public Library: Fitness Fridays

Sun, 2021-04-04 19:48

Dana Abbey – Community Engagement Coordinator/Colorado

The Goddard Public Library in Goddard, Kansas applied for and was awarded Network of the National Library of Medicine, MidContinental outreach funding for their Fitness Fridays program. The aim of the project is to increase health, information, and reading literacy within one program with activities available locally and statewide for all ages.

The free programming will combine favorite summertime activities: walking and reading with the StoryWalk® program, and will raise awareness of reliable health information resources like MedlinePlus. StoryWalk® is a fun, educational activity that places a children’s story along a popular walking route in the community. The national fitness and literacy project has inspired adults and children to read together while encouraging healthy outdoor activity in all 50 states and 11 countries.

In March of 2021, the library launched  “If You Plant a Seed” by award winning author Kadir Nelson on the Prairie Sunset Trail. The book tells a story about the power of even the smallest acts and the rewards of compassion and generosity, and is displayed on the trail on 15 signs. The pandemic made it even more important to provide activities outdoors that would allow social distancing.

Funding Amount: $2,500

Funding Period: August 17-April 15, 2021

Photo of librarian in a field in front of a sign for the Fitness Friday program.

Librarian Carrie Wharton, Program and Outreach Specialist

The post Goddard Public Library: Fitness Fridays first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Lessons Learned Thanks to the NNLM MCR Professional Development Award

Sat, 2021-04-03 20:31

Heather Steel
Children’s Mercy Hospital
Kansas City, Missouri

One year ago, I joined the Children’s Mercy Library Services team. During the interview process it was mentioned several times how the team has plans to make big changes to their existing digital library space. I was (and still am) excited about the potential of this undertaking. A few months after I started my manager shared with me information about the Library Marketing Professional Development (LMPD) Award, funded by the Network for the National Library of Medicine, MidContinental Region (NNLM MCR) and the opportunity to attend the Library Marketing Conference. We were working on our plans to overhaul our digital space, but we weren’t as sure about how to promote and advertise these upgrades.

I applied for the LMPD in September 2020 and included our plans to renew our outreach across the hospital as we launched a new library website. We needed guidance on how to actively promote ourselves and our initiatives. In October I was grateful to find out I was approved for the grant and would be able to attend the Library Marketing Conference. The wonderful conference was not only informative but also provided an opportunity to interact with librarians from various locations in a time when networking opportunities are limited. I enjoyed not only the sessions, but also the conversations taking place in the chat.

There were several moments throughout the conference that stuck with me. The presentation by Tamara King was a major one. Not only is the work she is doing in her library inspiring, but her messages about how to plan and market new products helped me while we transitioned to our new website. I have a highlighted section in my notes when she said, “Don’t Waffle!”. This sounds like a simple concept on the surface, but in the moment it is anything but simple. As we were on the precipice of making the official switch to our new site our team had some slight hesitation. I advocated for pulling the band aid off and moving forward. There will always be issues that come up, but we can’t face them until we jump. Our new website has been a great success even with the few hiccups along the way.

I also greatly enjoyed the mentorship with Jim Staley. Our conversations were incredibly helpful as a bouncing off point for promotion ideas. Switching to a new library platform is a huge change and we wanted to ensure we were presenting information how our users needed. When our team was deliberating how to create and share new library tutorials, Jim and I discussed making information available when and how users need it. His examples from his library were helpful as we considered ours.

My conversations with Jim also included discussions around the Mid-Continent Public Library System, which I happen to be a patron of. From his presentation during the conference and our chats I loved the inside look of how my local library system was not only handling their pandemic response, but also their plan to move forward.

Overall, the conference and mentorship have been very rewarding. I would highly recommend anyone starting to explore marking in libraries to explore the LMPD as a starting point.

The post Lessons Learned Thanks to the NNLM MCR Professional Development Award first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

<p>Brandon Jason University of Missouri

Sat, 2021-04-03 20:13

Brandon Jason
University of Missouri LIS Student

I am working with a virtual health programming team from the Community Engagement Network of All of Us, a research program from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) that aims to “build one of the most diverse health databases in the world.” Through this experience, I am learning from information professionals how to produce quality, accessible virtual programs on health and medical topics, and how best to partner and collaborate with leading health, medical, and information organizations. I am assisting specifically with a program on vaccine development and efficacy, and the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy among rural and Hispanic/Latinx populations in the United States – inspired by the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, but not exclusive to only those vaccines. We have partnered with the National Alliance of Hispanic Health (NAHH), the National Rural Health Association (NRHA), and the Juntos Center for Advancing Latino Health, and are proud to offer an all-female panel discussion featuring five Hispanic/Latinx doctors from various organizations. This program debuts via livestream on World Health Day (Wednesday, April 7). Through All of Us, I am also partnering with the American Association on Health and Disability (AAHD) to transition a pre-existing event on accessibility in virtual programming to instead focus on making library programs of all types as inclusive of different types of people as possible. This latter program will not debut during my time with the All of Us Community Engagement Network but will instead lay the groundwork for a future team to pick it up and produce it. Apart from these two programs, I have assisted by timekeeping a live panel discussion between African American women who have survived breast cancer and monitored cross-posting relationships during the livestreams of two other related virtual programs (“Life Interrupted: Telling Breast Cancer Stories”). Through these experiences offered by the University of Missouri iSchool’s Catalysts for Community Health (C4CH) grant, generously funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Studies (IMLS) I am being exposed to an area of the information profession I hadn’t know much about beforehand, and I am particularly grateful that I am gaining this insight during a time when public health is dominating the lives of everyone around the world. The opportunity to work with a national-level virtual programming team is also invaluable in my current work as a public library branch manager, since all our programming has migrated to the virtual sphere due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It is both interesting and important to see how information professionals are producing virtual health programs and partnering with leading organizations to get quality medical information into the hands of the public.

The post first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Join Us for the Vaccine Development and Efficacy Webinar!

Fri, 2021-04-02 11:48

Join the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network, the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, the National Rural Health Association, and Juntos on World Health Day, Wednesday, April 7, 2021, at 7 PM CT, for a virtual health program answering your questions about vaccines. The “Vaccine Development and Efficacy” webinar will feature five expert panelists who will discuss their own firsthand experiences with how vaccines are made, and why some people are hesitant to receive them.

Recent times have brought up many questions of how vaccines work, how they are tested for safety, and why vaccination is important in preventing disease and keeping communities healthy. In this webinar, we’ll hear the answers to these questions and more, straight from the experts.

The All of Us Research Program recognizes that diversity matters when it comes to health research. The world needs medical tools, including vaccines, that work for people of all backgrounds. We know that different groups have different levels of access to quality health care and information. Beyond that, history and culture have big roles to play in health attitudes like vaccine hesitancy. Acknowledging and respecting these important factors by maintaining good dialogue between healthcare providers, public health professionals, and the diverse public is crucial if we hope to improve health equity for all.

As part of the All of Us Community Engagement Center’s commitment to diverse representation in health research, this conversation will have a special focus on Hispanic and rural populations, and how these groups in particular experience vaccine hesitancy. The webinar will be broadcast in Spanish, with live English interpretation available. Furthermore, our panelists themselves represent a diverse group of health researchers, educators, and care providers. Each of them demonstrates a commitment to diversity and inclusion in healthcare.

The webinar’s panel includes 3 infectious disease experts from the Emory University School of Medicine: Dr. Paulina Rebolledo, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Global Health, Dr. Laila Woc-Colburn, Associate Professor, and Dr. Valeria Cantos, Assistant Professor. Dr. Susan Holecheck, Lecturer at the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University, will be bringing her expertise in immunology and virology to the table. Last but definitely not least, Dr. Kenia Pujols, Senior Clinical Research Coordinator with the Institute for Genomic Medicine at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, will be representing All of Us as she speaks to the potential the program has to diversify vaccine research. The event will be moderated by Edgar Gil Rico, Senior Director for Innovation and Program Development with the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, and champion of Latinx health promotion.

We hope you’ll join us for this important conversation! Head to nnlm.gov/vaccines or nnlm.gov/vacunas to register for the event and submit your questions for the panelists.

The post Join Us for the Vaccine Development and Efficacy Webinar! first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Life Interrupted

Thu, 2021-04-01 13:42
Virtual Film Screening and Panel Discussion Image of a woman with the movie titleThree women navigate their way through a life-changing diagnosis. The All of Us Research Program and the Network of the National Library of Medicine are proud to sponsor a series of five free virtual screenings of LIFE INTERRUPTED. Each virtual screening will conclude with a live Q&A panel discussion featuring breast cancer survivors and activists.

There are still two opportunities to participate in a screening and panel discussion. Order your free film and live Q&A panel discussion ticket here.

 

 

Presented by Henry Ford Health System
Film Screening
March 27 – April 2

Panel Discussion
Friday, April 2
1:00 PT | 2:00 MT | 3:00 CT | 4:00 ET

Presented by Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library
Film Screening
April 9 – April 15

Panel Discussion
Thursday, April 15
1:00 PT | 2:00 MT | 3:00 CT | 4:00 ET

 

The post Life Interrupted first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

April NNLM Reading Club Selections: End of Life

Thu, 2021-04-01 12:41

It’s difficult to talk about, even scary. Important things usually are.

And deciding what to do about that transition between life and death – how to make it more comfortable, what to do afterwards – is so very important, to our loved ones and ourselves. It involves issues not only of health, but of spirituality, compassion and trust.

Whether your focus of concern is on a family member or yourself, NNLM Reading Club suggests three books that may help with your understanding of end-of-life matters and those conversations you probably have been putting off.

In The Unwinding of the Miracle: A Memoir of Life, Death and Everything That Comes After, the late Julie Yip-Williams leaves behind a chronicle of a life filled with improbable outcomes since her childhood as a blind Vietnamese refugee who regained her sight at the hands of an American doctor. She faces her own terminal illness at age 37 with honesty.

New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast brings her idiosyncratic humor to her experience as caretaker of aging, declining parents in the graphic memoir Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? Finally, Zen Hospice Project co-founder Frank Ostaseski relates the lessons he has learned as a Buddhist teacher who has worked with more than a thousand dying patients in The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach Us about Living.

We encourage you to take a deep breath, read one of these books, and discuss it with people whose opinions you respect, especially those in your own family. It just might make you feel a whole lot better about the inevitable. Visit the NNLM Reading. Club: End of Life health topic to get started.

The post April NNLM Reading Club Selections: End of Life first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Library Marketing Professional Development Award Experience

Tue, 2021-03-30 20:10

Jennifer Thompson
University of Missouri

The University of Missouri System E-Resources Cooperative Office negotiates large agreements between the University of Missouri System and publishers such as Elsevier, Ovid, Springer, and Wiley.  There is a current global library movement to replace the traditional subscription-based nature of these agreements with Transformative and Open Access models that are more financially sustainable.  Articles that are published with Open Access are more impactful because they are available to all readers regardless of their income or affiliation with an institution.  Therefore, they also promote scholarship that is more inclusive of researchers from all walks of life.

The shift from paying for subscriptions to paying for Open Access publishing fees, which are more expensive, requires additional funding for libraries and a change in the University’s mindset about what the library does.  This is no simple task.  Libraries are not traditionally thought of as playing a role in the publishing aspect of scholarly research.

In Fall 2020, I attended the Sustainable Scholarship Virtual Forum hosted by the Virginia Research Libraries.  The speakers emphasized that effective communication is key to the advancement of Transformative and Open Access agreements.  One speaker recommended using laymen’s terms when describing these agreements so that the core idea of open access to knowledge and financial sustainability is not lost in library jargon.  Close to that time, I received an email from Chris Pryor, Interim Director of the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri about an NNLM MCR Library Marketing Professional Development Award which funded attendance to the Library Marketing & Communications Conference held online in November 2020. In addition to attending the conference, recipients received individual coaching and mentoring for the duration of the award period in the area of library engagement.  The timing could not have been better.

One of the most impactful conference sessions that I attended was Tamara King’s Neutral or Necessary:  How Libraries Can Find Their Voices in Times of Unrest.  Ms. King, Communications Director for Richland County Library in South Carolina, spoke about her library’s successful “Let’s Talk Race Initiative” which sought to “build community by encouraging honest dialogue, empathy, and courageous communication”. While my goal was not the same, there were several takeaways that I will apply to my work.  These include cultivating a reputation of trust and transparency within my office, starting small with manageable projects, and acting with consistency in order to avoid confusion.

Over the grant term, I also learned from group meetings with fellow award recipients and one-on-one sessions with my mentor, Jim Staley, Director, Community Relations and Planning, for Mid-Continent Public Library in Missouri.  An invaluable lesson that I learned from Jim is to meet stakeholders where they are and in formats that they are already using.  In order for transformative and open access agreements to be successful at the University of Missouri System, faculty and researchers must be aware of the new publishing cost funding that is available through their libraries. By working with the publishers who manage publication agreements and key faculty ambassadors, the library will be able to spread its message more effectively.

The post Library Marketing Professional Development Award Experience first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar – Developing Catalysts for Community Health in the Library Profession

Tue, 2021-03-30 20:07

Join us to learn how the University of Missouri School of Information Science and Learning Technologies (SISLT) is working to create Catalysts for Community Health (C4CH) in local communities across the MCR region through a unique IMLS grant opportunity. Attendees will learn about the history and vision of the C4CH grant as well as hear from members of the graduate student cohort who are working with NNLM MCR colleagues to complete fieldwork projects across the region to further explore health and wellness issues in their local or regional communities. The members of the C4CH cohort will share their collective experiences about what it has been like to be a part of this specialized graduate school program, project results, and key takeaways.

Tuesday April 20, 2021
2:00 MT/3:00 CT

Register

The post Webinar – Developing Catalysts for Community Health in the Library Profession first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Living on the Data Fringes: Open Science Goes Beyond Open Data

Fri, 2021-03-26 09:56

open science umbrellaReflecting on the immense amount of data openly and freely available online, especially on COVID-19, I wanted to write a blog post about the value and opportunities available to researchers related to open data. But as I began to write I thought about the other aspects of ‘openeness’ and realized there is so much more to write about than just open data. A recent blog post published by the SEA region of NNLM during love data week, 23 things about open data, completely covers the open data piece and I have nothing to add there. In addition, you may want to check out the very comprehensive list of COVID-19 open-access data and computational resources compiled by the Office of Data Science Strategy.

However, I think there are other aspects of open science at a broader level that could use some additional explanation and examples. The Carpentries, a non-profit organization, provides open and free coding and data science training opportunities through three programs, Data Carpentry, Software Carpentry, and Library Carpentry. Their lessons are all available online for self-directed learning or you can participate in training opportunities near you. Open Science can also entail open and participatory data collection through citizen science research activities like SciStarter. Open science initiatives and scientists often rely on open-source software and tools such as Zotero for collaborating on citation collection, Open Refine, Phyton, and R studio for data collection and manipulation, as well as many other visualization and data applications so that data can be easily shared and manipulated. Open Science also entails open collaboration for doing research that integrates tools for storing and sharing open science projects through the full research cycle such as the Open Science Framework (OSF). Open repositories can provide an infrastructure and space for collecting, archiving and preserving open data and provide identifiers for data collections when the research is finally published. And last but not least, is the emerging number of opportunities for publishing open research such as journals and books. Although many publishers require the author to pay publications fees for making research open to other researchers, there are many quality and open research examples available.

Even as I have been research open science and open scholarship I have found some open textbooks about open science I would like to recommend such as the Open Data Handbook, Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science, Issues in Open Research Data, and international perspectives in the Social Dynamics of Open Data. The Foster Open Science website in the EU offers some interesting paths into open science based on what you are interested in doing So to get started, jump into the open culture at any of these different open points to learn more about open data, how to find and manipulate open data, and how to share and publish in open formats.

Open Sicence Umbrella Image: Flicker

The post Living on the Data Fringes: Open Science Goes Beyond Open Data first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Coming Soon: New Regional Medical Libraries Designations 2021-2026

Wed, 2021-03-24 17:29

Last June, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) published the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for the 2021-2026 Regional Medical Libraries (RMLs), the central component of the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM).  Health sciences libraries submitted proposal applications in September.  An official announcement from the NLM regarding the new RMLs is forthcoming. The start date for the new Cooperative Agreement is May 1, 2021.

The RMLs carry out regional and national programs in support of the mission to provide U.S. researchers, health professionals, public health workforce, educators, and the public with equal access to biomedical and health information resources and data.  The emphasis of the RML program is to bring quality health, public health, and biomedical information resources within reach of the public and all health and public health professionals.

Among other objectives, each RML is expected to:

    • Develop approaches to promote awareness of, improve access to, and enable use of NLM’s resources and data,

    • Develop and support a diverse workforce to access information resources and data, and support data-driven research,

    • Provide community-driven innovative approaches and interventions for biomedical and health information access and use.

 For the 2021-2026 cooperative agreement period, seven Regional areas are defined:

Map of United States showing the 7 regions for 2021-2026

Region 1: Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. 

Region 2: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Region 3: Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Region 4: Arizona, Idaho, Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.

Region 5: Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States in the Pacific.

Region 6: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

Region 7: Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

NNLM Offices and Centers serve the NNLM program and are defined as:

The NNLM Web Services Office will develop and maintain reliable Web services for NNLM public and internal needs.

The NNLM Training Office will plan, create, share, deliver, coordinate, and evaluate an instructional program and educational materials based on key NLM products and services for a variety of audiences. NTO will assess and ensure a standard of high-quality for NNLM instructors and instructional content.

The NNLM Public Health Coordination Office will enhance the public’s health by expanding NNLM’s engagement with the diverse public health workforce through access to licensed literature,  coordinating training on NLM resources, and facilitating partnerships with public health institutions.

The NLM Evaluation Center will collaborate with RML, Office, and Center (ROC) staff to develop strategies and standardized approaches for evaluating outreach and education services

For more information, please refer to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) Organizational Handbook, https://nnlm.gov/national/guides/network-national-library-medicine-nnlm-organizational-handbook.

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Categories: RML Blogs

Register Today! NNLM Transgender Health Series

Wed, 2021-03-24 17:28

Please join the Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Southwest at the UCLA Biomedical Library and Southeastern Atlantic Region at the University of Maryland-Baltimore for our Transgender Health webinar series. With approximately 1 million adults in the U.S. identifying as Transgender and/or Gender Non-Binary (TGNB), this population experiences violence, inequities, biases, and discrimination on many levels. Less than one percent of physicians and 0.7 percent of medical students identify as TGNB, underscoring the need for quality, affirmative healthcare. These three webinars focus on the social determinants of health that create the backbone of health disparities and the resiliency this community holds. Click on the link to register.

 ·        Focus on Black Transgender Women – March 31, 2021 at 11am-12pm PT

Aryah Lester (she/her), author, speaker and educator, is a black woman of transgender experience committed to advocacy and health for transgender communities. Dr. Cheryl Holder (she/her), Fellow in the American College of Physicians, has dedicated her medical career to serving underserved populations, especially Transgender Women. The first webinar is an exploration of the effects of intersectionality and social determinants of health on transgender women of color.

·       Focus on Gender Identity & Inclusivity – April 5, 2021 at 11am-12pm PT

Dr. Alison Taur (she/her) serves as the regional lead for Nuclear Medicine in Kaiser Permanente Southern California and as a faculty member for the Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine. Dr. Ly Pham, MD (pronounced Lee) is nonbinary and their pronouns are they/them/theirs. Their specific areas of focus include LGBTQ+ healthcare, gender-affirming care (which includes hormone therapy), and HIV care and prevention. Drs. Taur & Pham will speak about their personal backgrounds as TGNB physicians practicing at Kaiser Permanente and their work in advocating and caring for their communities.

·       Focus on Mental Health & Resiliency – April 12, 2021 at 11am-12pm PT

Dr. Ren Massey (he/his), licensed psychologist, has served on the Board of Directors of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH), is Faculty & Co-Chair/Mental Health Chair of the WPATH Global Education Initiative (GEI). lore dickey (he/his), PhD, ABPP, is an expert in the field of transgender psychological services, has served as co-chair of the APA task force on guidelines for working with trans people, and is an APA fellow. This session will break down societal assumptions about the LGBTQIA+ community, their mental health needs, and resources to support them.

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Categories: RML Blogs

Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing Opportunities

Mon, 2021-03-22 19:46

Spring is just coming to the MidContinental Region!  Springs means longer days, warmer temperatures, and colorful flowers.  It also means that Citizen Science Month is coming in April!  April is the perfect time for people to experience new activities, inside and/or outside.  For libraries, this means that now is the time to plan programs or displays that introduce your patrons to citizen science and crowdsourcing.

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine continues its partnership with SciStarter, an online community dedicated to supporting citizen science for both project managers and participants, to support Citizen Science Month. If you are new to citizen science and are looking for help with citizen science programming, start with the Introduction to Citizen Science Tutorial.  Also, check out  SciStarter’s Library and Community Guide to Citizen Science, which includes a facilitator’s kit, programs in a box, posters and other materials, book lists and books, and more to get you on your way.  These resources are great for starting your own citizen science program for Citizen Science Month but can be used anytime during the year.  Also, NLM provides access to a variety of resources and materials for basic health, environmental health, and genetics that can support citizen science outreach efforts in your community. National Library of Medicine resources for citizen science include MedlinePlusKids Environment Kids Health, and ChemIDplus.

Academic libraries looking for ways to engage students, faculty and staff in crowdsourcing activities can participate in a virtual Wikipedia edit-a-thon.  To kick off Citizen Science Month, NNLM has chosen March 31 for our biannual, #citeNLM editing campaign.  The topic of the Spring 2021 campaign is Healthy Aging.  You can take part in #citeNLM during the month of April in many ways:

  1. Participate virtually as an individual: sign up to participate in our virtual edit-a-thon on March 31, or edit health articles another time and add the project hashtag #citeNLM in the Edit Summary.
  2. Host a virtual edit-a-thon at your library using our organizer’s guide to get started.
  3. Share our campaign on social media: use #citeNLM in your posts about the event!

For more details, visit nnlm.gov/wiki.

Taking part in Citizen Science Month is a great way to introduce patrons to scientific research and to help them turn curiosity into impact.  Explore the opportunities today!

Margie Sheppard – MCR Kansas Technology Coordinator

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Categories: RML Blogs

Library Marketing Professional Development Award

Mon, 2021-03-22 19:43

Ashley Granger
University of Missouri

The University of Missouri library marketing team does a multitude of tasks, but one of them is to maintain our social media accounts, including Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.  Because the library wants to focus on different branches of our main library, and to highlight what our various departments do, the marketing team made the decision to have “reporters” create posts on a schedule to make sure there was a variety of content.  This was my introduction into social media marketing.

My favorite posts would probably be classed as “bookstagram” posts: memes, book covers, and posts of that nature.  This helps to tell patrons what new books we’ve received and provides both serious content and fun book-related posts for our followers.  We also have people from special collections who post technical information, posts about user experiences, and reposts from students who have tagged us.  Our library Instagram was even featured on a Buzzfeed article about the best library accounts to follow, and featured a picture of one of my posts, which led to an increase of followers.  I found myself increasingly enjoying the social media aspect of my job and brainstorming more ideas of content that could be posted.  But where would I start?  I had little experience with marketing and what would work best for our followers.

I saw an email about the Library Marketing Professional Development Award through the Network of the National Library of Medicine that provided an application, open to staff and faculty, to receive a grant to attend the marketing conference in 2020.  I applied and received the grant.

The conference was, to put it lightly, incredible for me.  I took pages and pages of notes.  I googled software and websites and book titles that were mentioned, my LinkedIn account was flooded with invitations, and I was even able to connect with someone who was co-authoring a book about social media in academic libraries, and I submitted a case study about our library’s Instagram page to be included.  I learned about the best color/fonts to use on posts, how many words should be a on post for the most impact, and even how long it takes a person to become engaged in a video. As a paraprofessional cataloger, I never expected to be published anywhere, or have this kind of knowledge available to me.

The grant also included a mentor, Jim, who I meet with monthly.  Jim helped me narrow the focus of my project from pages of notes and ideas to a focused plan to post a weekly “tip” about our library to get more information out to our Instagram followers on a regular basis with the same hashtag to provide consistent content that is under a common theme (and hashtag).  This will allow the marketing team to view the analytics and track the traffic for those posts to see if this is valuable content, or if our marketing efforts would be better spent on something else.

I found the entire experience to be incredibly helpful and rewarding.  It provided me with information, the chance to network with others, and a way to take an idea of mine and put it to practical use.  I learned how to approach others with my ideas in a concise and professional way, and how to shift gears when something wasn’t working.  I have never had a formal mentor before and wasn’t sure how helpful it would be, but my meetings with Jim have been invaluable.  I could not have done this project without him.

While my project is still ongoing, I am excited to have had the opportunity for this grant, and to have met the people I did, and to gain the knowledge I now have.  I highly recommend this grant program and the conference itself.  I’m not a marketing librarian, or a social media librarian – just a paraprofessional library employee who posts on Instagram, and I still found it extremely relevant.  If your job includes anything with social media, accessibility, or marketing, I guarantee you will learn something new at this conference.

The post Library Marketing Professional Development Award first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey

Tue, 2021-03-16 15:43

In this post, Paula Mozen, Director of the documentary LIFE INTERRUPTED, shares  the story of her journey with this film about the experiences of three breast cancer survivors. Portions of the original post have been edited for clarity.

I was a documentary filmmaker long before I became a breast cancer survivor. When I was first diagnosed, I wanted to take care of my situation and move on. The last thing I wanted to do was to make a film about it, a project that I knew would take several years to fundraise and complete. As time passed and I gained perspective on my own situation, I realized I was NOT alone; there are hundreds of thousands of us out here. In the United States, 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2021, an estimated 330,000 new cases will be diagnosed.

Breast Cancer is indeed an epidemic. It can be found across all age, gender, socio-economic, ethnic, and geographic groups. It does not discriminate; however, as we know, access to quality healthcare can be very discriminatory.

                                                                     MSU photo by Kelly Gorham

Holding these truths together plus having the inside track to my own experience, I decided to make the film I wish I could have seen when I was diagnosed – both times. I wanted LIFE INTERRUPTED to put a face to the statistics and tell meaningful stories in order to inspire change.

Breast cancer patients are often asked to make their own choices in terms of treatments available. The moment the diagnosis is received, each person must gather information and make life-altering decisions under extreme emotional duress, all in a relatively short period of time. While individual circumstances are unique, hearing about the personal journeys from articulate women who have traveled this road before is invaluable for navigating treatments and keeping hope alive. Knowledge is power; the successful prevention and treatment of breast cancer depends on this.

Persistence is a common theme for indie filmmakers and breast cancer survivors alike. Just when you think you are finished, there is usually another mountain to climb.

From Berkeley to Berlin to Beirut and back to Bozeman, MY LIFE INTERRUPTED was screened, was reviewed, and won several awards at festivals. After these events, I wanted to connect directly with audiences who cared about the themes and issues the film covered, including healthcare advocates, providers, and survivors. My hope was to provide empowerment for survivors to be self-advocates  and to share with family members, advocates and healthcare providers what it truly means to survive breast cancer.

I learned about the All of Us Research Program (http://joinallofus.org/nlm) and partnership with NNLM through Julie Sherwood, the Partnership & Community Engagement Manager for the Wichita Public Library. After a series of emails, a partnership was formed that would involve collaborations with NNLM staff from throughout the organization, including Brittney Thomas, Brian Leaf, Linda Loi, Darlene Kaskie, Michele Spatz, George Strawley, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Richard McLean, Helen Spielbauer, Rachel Maller, Holly Stevenson, Laura Bartlett, and Frost Keaton.

Beginning March 3rd through April 15th, NNLM and I look forward to presenting the LIFE INTERRUPTED Virtual Screening Series which includes live interactive panel discussions in partnership with The Black Women’s Health Imperative, The Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS), Asian Health Coalition, Henry Ford Health System, Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library.

During the panel discussions, hear from medical or research professionals who specialize in breast cancer, breast cancer survivors, and advocates who represent populations historically underrepresented in medical research. Panelists will share their experiences and knowledge on diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer, living with breast cancer, advancing treatments and cures for breast cancer, and advocating for precision medicine and diversity of medical research through programs like All of Us.

It has been an absolute honor and pleasure to work with the entire team so far, a group of talented, motivated and detail-oriented individuals who are dedicated to creating the best possible audience user experience. Everyone is focused on making each event engaging, interactive, relevant and accessible. To work with a team like this is – well – a filmmaker’s dream come true; we are all on the same page, doing the right thing for the right reasons, all to empower patients and share meaningful stories.

Thank you to Paula Mozen for the work she is doing and for contributing to this blog post. We look forward to seeing the great things that come from this project.

Below are all the upcoming free virtual screenings and LIVE Q&A panel discussions. For more information or to attend any of these upcoming events, visit watch.eventive.org/lifeinterrupted.

Free Virtual Screenings start March 16 and continue through April 15.

LIVE Q&A Panel Discussions

Monday, March 22 at 2 pm MT presented by ACCESS: Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services

Wednesday, March 31 at 4 pm MT presented by the Asian Health Coalition

Friday, April 2 at 2 pm MT presented by Henry Ford Health System

Monday, April 15 at 2 pm MT presented by Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library

 

For more information on the film LIFE INTERRUPTED and to sign up for the free screening, click here: https://watch.eventive.org/lifeinterrupted. .

Remember to follow the NNLM MCR on Twitter.

The post Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Responding to the COVID-19 Infodemic: An NNLM Virtual Symposium – April 8-9

Wed, 2021-03-10 15:49

Symposium website: https://nnlm.vfairs.com/en/

We are excited to announce that registration (free!) is open for a new NNLM virtual symposium focused on addressing the COVID-19 Infodemic in our communities.

What is the Symposium about?

The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the disparities of underserved, minority and underrepresented communities. This includes ensuring equal understanding of accurate health information, education in hard hit communities and valuing inclusion in clinical research to overcome COVID-19.

The NNLM Virtual Symposium is an opportunity to address misinformation and mistrust, raise awareness about the pandemic and efforts to combat it. Symposium attendees can expect to come away from this experience with a better understanding of COVID-19 as well as strategies and programs that can be used to engage with communities. We are excited to feature the following keynote speakers:

  • Vinay Gupta, MD, MPA, Affiliate Assistant Professor, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Seattle, WA
  • Gregg Orton, National Director, The National Council of Asian Pacific Americans (NCAPA), Washington, DC
  • Elizabeth Wilhelm, Health Communications Specialist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Global Immunization Division, Atlanta, GA
  • Chris Pernell, MD, MPH, FACPM, Chief Strategic Integration and Health Equity Officer, University Hospital, New York, NY

There will also be paper sessions, panels, and a networking space; more information will be announced in the upcoming weeks.

Who is the Symposium for?

NNLM invites anyone who is interested in learning more about information-related issues during COVID-19, which includes, but is not limited to: health professionals, librarians, researchers, community-based organization staff, and students.

Free continuing education credits will be available for attendees from the Medical Library Association and from the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing.

When is the Symposium?

April 8-9, 2021

9a-2p PT/ 12p-5p ET

How can I attend the Symposium?

Free registration is now open on our symposium website: https://nnlm.vfairs.com/en/registration

Questions about the Symposium?

Be sure to check our website soon for more information on the agenda, networking sessions, code of conduct, and a general FAQ. Any other questions can be sent to Tony Nguyen at ttnguyen@hshsl.umaryland.edu

The post Responding to the COVID-19 Infodemic: An NNLM Virtual Symposium – April 8-9 first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

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