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SEA Currents

Newsletter of the NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region

Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

What’s New in the Horizon Report, 2016 Higher Education Edition

Monday, February 8th, 2016

Written by Tony Nguyen, Emerging Technologies/Communications Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM), Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SE/A). Contact Tony at tnguyen@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

New Media Consortium recently released the Horizon Report, 2016 Higher Education that identifies trends, challenges, and emerging technologies. The report is designed to examine new technologies and determine their potential impact in colleges and universities worldwide. In review of the new report and comparing it to the 2016 Report, the following new points were discovered:

Important Developments in Educational Technology for Higher Education

  • Learning Analytics and Adaptive Learning – In order to build better pedagogies, empower active learning, target at-risk students, and assess factors of completion and success, institutions will utilize adaptive learning technologies to online platforms that will adjust to individual learners’ needs.
  • Augmented and Virtual Reality – Virtual reality constructs provide contextual learning experiences that can foster exploration of real world data in virtual surroundings. Students will be able to construct broader understandings based on interactions with virtual objects.
  • Affective Computing – Affective computing is a concept in which computers attain humanlike understanding through activities and understanding. This concept can influence and support online learning in which a computerized tutor could adjust and react to students to help motivate and boost confidence.
  • Robotics – New outreach programs are promoting robotics and programming as multi-disciplinary STEM skills to make students better problem solvers. New students show that interaction with robots can help learners of varying needs develop and improve their communication skills.

While the technologies listed aren’t necessarily new, innovative approaches have either made them new again or have brought them into the realm of higher education. There are a number of reasons these technologies could support or impede adoption within colleges and universities. The following new points were identified to drive planning and decision-making or impede adoption of new technologies if left unresolved.

Key Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption in Higher Education

  • Rethinking How Institutions Work – In order to make 21st century students work savvy upon graduation, institutions will consider policy initiatives, programs, and changes in curriculum in support of hybrid learning and competency-based education centered on online education.
  • Shift to Deeper Learning Approaches – Students need to be able to make clear connections between the curriculum and the real world. Project-based learning, challenge based learning, inquiry based learning, and similar methods are fostering more active learning experiences. Instructors will need to leverage technology to relate material taught to real life applications.

Significant Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption in Higher Education

  • Balancing Our Connected and Unconnected Lives – As education aligns with technological trends, educators will have a responsibility to promote a balance of technological tools so students do not get lost with the abundance of digital tools and become aware of their digital footprint, and its implications.
  • Keeping Education Relevant – Today, a college degree does not equate gainful employment. Addressing this challenge will require institutions to explore new opportunities to earn a college degree that will prepare students with industry-specific skills and maintain the ethical training and credibility of traditional academia.

This review highlighted topics not covered in the 2015 report. There are a number of additional trends and challenges to consider should your organization consider adopting a new technology within your college or university. I encourage you to download the Horizon Report, 2016 Higher Education Edition and explore these topics and more in greater detail.

Webinar: NN/LM Greater Midwest Region Tech Talk

Thursday, September 10th, 2015

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM), Greater Midwest Region (GMR) is holding a Tech Talk session tomorrow, Friday, September 11, 2015 at 1pm CT. This session was developed to encourage all to re-think how to use technology to improve access to information. In addition, we hope it will help some attendees identify ideas in their environment and develop proposals.

Please visit http://nnlm.gov/gmr/training-schedule/all/GMR#results to register for this webinar.

Creative Ideas for Technology Improvement  How do you define “technology improvement”?  In this session we will look at examples of creative Technology Improvement Awards, how to find ideas for technology improvement award applications, and creative ways to think about technology improvement.  The presentation will also include Rachel Sindelar as a guest speaker.  Rachel was the project director for the TIA, Interdisciplinary Point-of-care Patient Health Education Initiative, awarded to the Broadlawns Medical Center Library.

  • Presenter:  Carol Bean
  • MLA CE Credit available until: October 30, 2015

Please contact Carol Bean (cielbie@uic.edu) if you have questions about the webinar or the award.

What’s New in the Horizon Report, 2015 Library Edition

Tuesday, August 18th, 2015

Written by Tony Nguyen, Emerging Technologies/Communications Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM), Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SE/A). Contact Tony at tnguyen@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

New Media Consortium recently released the Horizon Report, 2015 Library Edition that identifies trends, challenges, and emerging technologies. The report is designed to examine new technologies and determine their potential impact on academic and research libraries worldwide. In review of the new report and comparing it to the 2014 Report, the following new points were discovered:

Important Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries

The following new tools and technologies were identified that will likely drive planning over the next several years.

  • Makerspaces – Makerspaces give educators an opportunity to engage learners in creative, higher-order problem solving through self-directed design, construction, and iteration. While academic libraries are undergoing significant change, the addition of a makerspace may solidify the library as a hub for students to access, create, and engage in hands-on projects.
  • Online Learning – Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have reopened the topic of online learning. Libraries can help facilitate the future of online learning by assisting with media production, connecting to special collections, and curating content.
  • Information Visualization – Researchers and scientists seek new formats that enable them to present complex datasets in a comprehensive manner. A number of skills (aside from technical skills to utilize creative software) were identified with information visualization: data analysis, design thinking, and contextual, inquiry-based exploration.
  • Location Intelligence – A growing facet of location intelligence is location-based services that will provide content customized according to the users’ location. The University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, for example, assisted in the creation of a Study Buddy app. This app allows students, through secure authentication, the ability to check-in on their phone, use location data to share their coordinates, and find classroom peers to quickly form a study group.
  • Machine Learning – Speech recognition and semantic applications utilize machine learning that can not only input, retrieve, and interpret data but also learn from it. A number of companies are developing self-service data preparation software that learns and improves based on users’ interactions. Artificial intelligence could assist by mining data and adjusting library services in real time.

While the technologies listed aren’t necessarily new, innovative approaches have either made them new again or have brought them into the realm of academic and research libraries. There are a number of reasons these technologies could support or impede adoption within libraries. The following new points were identified to drive planning and decision-making or impede adoption of new technologies if left unresolved:

Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption in Academic and Research Libraries

  • Rethinking Library Spaces – A number of libraries are expanding to make room for active learning classrooms, media production studios, makerspaces, and other changes conducive to hands-on work.
  • Increasing Value of the User Experience (UX) – User experience is a common term utilized by companies like Amazon, Netflix, and Google. Designing high-quality experiences to help researchers and students navigate massive amounts of data and attract new patrons is a new area for libraries to develop and improve.

Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption in Academic and Research Libraries

  • Improving Digital Literacy – A lack of a consensus on what comprises digital literacy has hindered many libraries from developing adequate policies and programs that address the development of this competency.
  • Managing Knowledge Obsolescence – The rate at which information, software tools, and devices improve and change is exponential. Librarians need the ability and desire to constantly pursue and absorb new technologies and skills.

This review highlighted topics not covered in the 2014 report. There are a number of trends and challenges to consider should your organization consider adopting a new technology within your library. I encourage you to download the Horizon Report, 2015 Library Edition and explore these topics and more in greater detail.

SEAside Webinar: April 17, 2015, 10:00 AM (EST) Tech Talk – How to Speak IT Panel Discussion – Recording Now Available

Friday, March 27th, 2015

Recording: https://youtu.be/aCKRvPFYHvA

Date and Time: Friday, April 17, 2015, 10:00 AM EST

Presenters: Nadine Dexter, MLS, AHIP, Director, Harriet F Ginsburg Health Sciences Library, University of Central Florida College of Medicine. Devica Samsundar, MLS, AHIP, Corporate Director, Library & Information Services, Baptist Health South Florida. Amanda Chiplock, MLIS, Senior Medical Librarian & Department Head at S. E. Wimberly Library, Florida Atlantic University. Andrea Wright, MLIS, Information Services Coordinator & Technology Librarian, University of South Alabama Biomedical Library, Mobile, AL.

Moderator: Kimberley Barker, MLIS, Chair, NN/LM SE/A Technology Program Advisory Committee and Digital Initiatives Librarian, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia.

Contact: For additional information or questions about this webinar, please contact Tony Nguyen at tnguyen@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

Summary: This webinar, sponsored by the NN/LM SE/A Technology Program Advisory Committee, will provide firsthand insight in communicating and working with your institution’s IT department. Each presenter will have 10 minutes to share a story or everyday experience working with IT – the triumphs as well as any lessons learned, or take-away tips for successful collaborations with IT. What made the encounter successful? What tips can you offer attendees who are facing challenges working with IT to accomplish a tech project, or just in general daily tasks?

Bio: Amanda Chiplock, MLIS, is currently the Senior Medical Librarian and Department Head at S.E. Wimberly Library, Florida Atlantic University where she is working with IT and the College of Medicine curriculum committees to implement innovative programming to facilitate learning in a growing, dynamic medical school. In her previous role as Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Health Professions Division Library, Nova Southeastern University, Amanda was tasked with leading a change in culture by implementing an iPad lending program and an award-winning circulation program for iOS apps focused on enhancing student engagement and academic success.

Bio: Devica Samsundar, MLIS, AHIP has held various positions in the library at Baptist Health South Florida since 1991. Currently she is the Corporate Director of Library & Information Services, where one of her responsibilities is to oversee the life cycle of electronic resources for the institution. In her prior roles as Manager of Electronic Resources and Electronic Resources Librarian she was responsible for administration, support, and evaluation of electronic resource.

Bio: Nadine Dexter, MLS, D-AHIP, is responsible for the successful start-up, planning, direction, and operation of all administrative and service functions of the Health Sciences Library. She is currently working with faculty and staff to create an environment that promotes growth, creativity and motivation throughout the College. She is also working on developing and applying technology tools for teaching, learning, assessment and outreach; as she is preparing for integrating library-training programs into the health sciences curricula and clinical environment. Nadine will also provide for the strategic use of knowledge resources and developing partnerships that support sources of external funding.

Bio: Andrea Wright, MLIS, is the Information Services Coordinator and Technology Librarian at the University of South Alabama Biomedical Library in Mobile, AL. She serves as a member of the NNLM SE/A Technology PAC.

Bio: Kimberley Barker, MLIS, Barker is the University of Virginia’s Claude Moore Health Sciences Library’s Digital Initiatives Librarian, and also serves as chair of the Technology Program Advisory Committee for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region.

Upon completion of the Beyond the SEA Webinar, each participant will receive 1 hour of continuing education credit awarded by the Medical Library Association. Certificates will be available electronically following completion of the online survey supplied at the end of the webinar.

What do you need to join this conference?

  • A computer (with Flash installed)
  • A telephone

How do I connect?

Go to this URL: http://webmeeting.nih.gov/beyondthesea/

  • Enter as a Guest
  • Sign in with your first and last name.
  • Follow the instructions in the meeting room to have Adobe Connect call your phone (this is the preferred way; however, if you have an extension or for some reason cannot let Adobe connect call your phone, instructions will be available when you sign in to Adobe Connect.)

Test your connection: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm.

Get a quick overview: http://www.adobe.com/go/connectpro_overview

Tools You Can Use: Kahoot! – Game-based Blended Learning and Classroom Response System

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

Written by: Tony Nguyen, Emerging Technologies/Communications Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region
Contact Tony at: tnguyen@hshsl.umaryland.edu
Looking for a new gamification tool for your class? Check out Kahoot!

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About
Kahoot! is a learning game which consists of multiple choice questions – as a quiz, discussion, or survey – in any topic, language or ability. It’s projected at the front of the classroom and played by the whole class together in real-time (answered on their own personal device.) Kahoot! offers the opportunity to interest and engage students during class or review content previously taught.

Benefits
Using this tool gives you the opportunity for the following:
• Use a simple “drag n drop” function to create and manage “Kahoots” in the form of quizzes, surveys, or polls related to specific topics.
• Locate other public “Kahoots” and duplicate and edit them to suit your class needs.
• Use images, videos, photos, screenshots for your questions.
• Recall and repeat use of your “Kahoots” when needed.
• Access from any location with proper technology.

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You can learn new tips about Kahoot! by following them on Facebook, Twitter, blog or YouTube channel. To get started, a user’s guide is available for download.

Usage and Observations
Currently Kahoot! is available for use for free. Participants do not need an account to join. Students visit kahoot.it and enter in a game pin and personal nickname to enter. Participants can use any smart phone device, tablet, or laptop with internet access to play. A video demonstrating how Kahoot! works is available for you to view as well.

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Once all students have joined, you can then start the “Kahoot.” Each quiz session can have up to 10 questions with 4 answer choices each. As participants see a question projected onto a screen, they’ll have a time limit to answer the question.

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After participants answer each question, instructors get an instant snapshot of overall understanding. As participants see their results, instructors could use this to help instigate classroom discussions or assist in topic reviews.

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Additionally, the top 5 players in the game are displayed at the front to help motivate competitive students in the class.

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Students have the ability to rate each quiz upon completion. Teachers have the ability to download participant results to get a complete overview of how they did. Results can also be directly downloaded into a Google Drive account as well. More information regarding Kahoot! can be found in their FAQs.

Overall, I found this tool straight forward and easy to use. The time consuming part would be to consider what questions to ask, whether or not to use images or YouTube videos, and multiple answer options. I encourage you to check out Kahoot! and share your thoughts as well.

Last updated on Thursday, May 19, 2016

Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012340-01 with the University of Maryland, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.