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SEA Currents

Newsletter of the NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region

Archive for the ‘NLM/NIH News’ Category

NIH Requests Information on Processes for database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) Data Submission, Access, and Management

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

Today, in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts, NIH published a Request for Information (RFI) that seeks public comment on the data submission and access processes for the NIH National Center for Biotechnology (NCBI) database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP).  The RFI also seeks comment on the management of data in dbGaP in order to consider options to improve and streamline these processes and to maximize the use and utility of dbGaP.

The complete RFI, as well as instructions on how to comment, can be found by clicking here.  Electronic responses will be accepted through April 7, 2017. NIH will consider all public comments before taking next steps. No proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should be included in your response. Comments received, including any personal information, will be posted without change after the close of the comment period to the following website: https://gds.nih.gov/

Comments may also be mailed to: Office of Science Policy, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 20892. Mailed comments must be postmarked by April 7, 2017, to be considered.

Additional information about the importance of this RFI can be found in an “Under the Poliscope” blog published today by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz.

For more information or additional questions, please contact the NIH Office of Science Policy, by email at SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov or by telephone at 301-496-9838.

Data Science Research: Personal Health Libraries for Consumers and Patients (R01) (PAR-17-159)

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-159.html

Purpose

The National Library of Medicine seeks applications for novel informatics and data science approaches that can help individuals gather, manage and use data and information about their personal health. A goal of this program is to advance research and application by patients and the research community through broadly sharing the results via publication, and through open source mechanisms for data or resource sharing. To bring the benefits of big data research to consumers and patients, new biomedical informatics and data science approaches are needed, shaped to meet the needs of consumers and patients, whose health literacy, language skills, technical sophistication, education and cultural traditions affect how they find, understand and use personal health information. Novel data science approaches are needed to help individuals at every step, from harvesting to storing to using data and information in a personal health library.

Applicants must base their proposed work on an informed profile of the intended users, and, the work should be developed through interaction with the user. The strongest projects will provide approaches that incorporate health data and information from more than one source, such as diagnostic images and links to full-text articles or genome sequence data linked to a family health history. An application should be centered on the problem area being addressed and the intended audience, propose a possible solution that employs novel data science or informatics, and undertake a pilot that will result in evidence of the degree of success and/or needed next steps. Applicants should expect to involve the intended users in their work.

This program expires March 20, 2018 unless reissued. Only electronic applications are accepted.

NLM Contact

Dr. Alan VanBiervliet alan.vanbiervliet@nih.gov

Deadlines

Deadlines for New Applications: May 1, 2017 and March 19, 2018

 

NLM Webinar series: “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”

Friday, February 10th, 2017

Beginning February 21, 2017, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) will present the three-part webinar series “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed.”

This series of workshops will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of three 90-minute sessions, students will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

This series of classes involves hands-on demonstrations and exercises, and we encourage students to follow along. Before registering for these classes, we strongly recommend that you:

*             Watch the first Insider’s Guide class “Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed”, or be familiar with the basic concepts of APIs and E-utilities.

*             Be familiar with structured XML data (basic syntax, elements, attributes, etc.)

*             Have access to a Unix command-line environment on your computer (for more information, see our Installing EDirect page: https://dataguide.nlm.nih.gov/edirect/install.html#unix-command-line-environment).

*             Install the EDirect software (for more information, see our Installing EDirect page: https://dataguide.nlm.nih.gov/edirect/install.html#edirect-installation).

Due to the nature of this class, registration will be limited to 50 students per offering.

Registration is currently open for the February/March 2017 series:

  • Part 1: Getting PubMed Data: Tuesday, February 21, 1-2:30 PM ET
  • Part 2: Extracting Data from XML: Tuesday, February 28, 1-2:30 PM ET
  • Part 3: Building Practical Solutions: Tuesday, March 7, 1-2:30 PM ET

Students are expected to attend Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 in a single series.

To register, and for more information, visit https://goo.gl/qgClZn.

An Easier Way to Search Clinical Trials: Try the Beta Version of ClinicalTrials.gov

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

An Easier Way to Search Clinical Trials: Try the Beta Version of ClinicalTrials.gov

Health outreach professionals can help patients find relevant clinical trials in a quicker, more efficient manner through the beta version of ClinicalTrials.gov, which can be tested now at https://clinicaltrials.gov/beta/. The beta version of ClinicalTrials.gov offers improved features including:

Default Search with Fielded Search Options – The default search form now includes separate search fields for Condition/Disease, Intervention/Treatment, Other Terms, US State, and Country.
Search Result Filters – Filter studies by status, such as “Recruiting” or “Completed”. Also filter by study type, study results, study phase, or funder type.
Show/Hide Columns – Choose which columns to display in the search results table.
Saved Studies – Use a checkbox to add studies of interest to a “Saved Studies” list.

The new beta version of ClinicalTrials.gov accesses the same data as the current operational version of ClinicalTrials.gov. You can provide feedback about the beta version of the site by choosing the Give us feedback link in the upper right corner of the beta homepage.

Learn more about the beta version of ClinicalTrials.gov: http://go.usa.gov/x9HZ9

 

February NIH News in Health Now Available

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

NIH News in Health: A monthly newsletter from the National Institutes of Health, part of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services

 

 

 

 

Check out the February issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research: To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark http://health.nih.gov

Do Social Ties Affect Our Health?
Exploring the Biology of Relationships

Learn how your relationships with others can influence your biology and well-being.
Read more about social ties and your health.

 

 

 

 

The Power of Your Pancreas
Keep Your Digestive Juices Flowing

Your pancreas produces digestive juices and hormones that help you benefit from the food you eat.
Read more about how to keep your pancreas working properly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health Capsules

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Last updated on Tuesday, Nov 8, 2016

Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012340 with the University of Maryland, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.