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Meet Me Monday: Lorraine Sheldon, Gibson D. Lewis Health Science Library

Lorraine Sheldon, Gibson D. Lewis Health Science Library

Lorraine Sheldon serves as the Outreach Librarian for the Gibson D. Lewis Health Science Library in Fort Worth, Texas.

As Outreach Librarian, Lorraine works to connect the communities in the North Texas area with the knowledge and resources available through the National Library of Medicine. Since the 1980s Lewis Library has had a long history of reaching out to populations beyond its own campus community. In her work, Lorraine seeks to generate programming that is informative, empowering, and visually appealing. Before joining Lewis Library, she started her career working at the Bahá’í World Center International Archives in Haifa, Israel as a photo archivist. After returning to the U.S., she worked for several years as a Regional Coordinator for the South Central Training Institute, a non-profit education system designed to build capacity in individuals to improve society. During this time, she received her Masters of Science in Information Science from the University of North Texas.

Lorraine plans to continue her work serving both health professionals and non-health professionals alike in order to create vibrant and healthy communities.

Contact Lorraine at lorraine.sheldon@unthsc.edu or 817-735-5125.

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Louisiana Sees More Cases of West Nile Virus

“Photo” by FotoshopTofs
is licensed under CC0.

Mosquito

The Louisiana Department of Health reported this week that it has seen 36 cases of West Nile virus in Louisiana so far in 2016. Six more cases were reported within the last two weeks.

Of those diagnosed with West Nile virus, 15 were asymptomatic or fever cases, a mild illness. Twenty-one were neuroinvasive, a very severe case which can lead to brain damage and even death.

Like Zika virus, West Nile virus is a mosquito-transmitted disease. Many people (70 – 80 percent according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) who contract the disease do not experience any symptoms. However, symptoms do include, fever, headache, body aches, joint aches, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, neck stiffness, tremors, seizure, paralysis, disorientation and coma.

Currently there is no vaccine or specific treatment for West Nile virus. The CDC recommends over-the-counter painkillers or hospitalization if symptoms are severe.

The primary way to prevent West Nile virus is to protect yourself from mosquitos. This can be done by using insect repellent and wearing long sleeves and pants.

For more information regarding West Nile virus in Louisiana, please visit the Louisiana Department of Health’s website.

For more general information regarding West Nile virus, please visit the CDC’s website.

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Bacteria on Nurses’ Scrubs Can Transfer to Patients

“Photo” by Parentingupstream
is licensed under CC0.

Stethoscope

Hospitals are a place you go, generally, if you’re unwell and need immediate medical attention. But what happens if the place where you’re meant to be recovering is actually making you sicker?

In a new MedlinePlus article, they explain that nurses who are treating multiple patients can often pick up those disease causing germs and then spread them to other patients. According to researchers, the germs are often found on the sleeves and pockets of a nurse’s scrubs, and then often on bed railings.

A 40-person study found that during a 12-hour shift there were 22 instances of one of five diseases being transmitted by a nurse’s scrubs.

One of the primary takeaways of this sort of study is that healthcare providers have to be ever cautious on how they are treating patients and take the necessary steps to prevent disease transmission.

To read more about disease transmission by nurses’ scrubs, please visit “Nurses’ ‘Scrubs’ Pick Up Bad Hospital Germs.”

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Meet Me Monday: Marilyn Goff, TWU – Houston Center Library

Marilyn Goff, Librarian, TWU - Houston Center Library

Marilyn Goff has been the librarian for the Houston campus of Texas Woman’s University since 2000.

Marilyn manages a virtual library in the health sciences and supports about 2,000 faculty, staff, and students on the subjects of Business, Health Care Administration, Library & Information Studies, Nursing, Nutrition & Food Sciences, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Management. TWU Houston focuses primarily on advanced degrees, but does have one undergraduate program for junior and senior BSN students.

Please visit TWU Institute of Health Sciences – Houston Center for more information!

 

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Arkansas Mumps Outbreak Growing

“Photo” from jaytaix
is licensed under CC0.

Preparing a Shot

Northwest Arkansas has seen an increasing number of mumps cases in the last month. As of Oct. 12, there were 492 individuals involved. The majority of the individuals involved are children, and more than 30 schools in Arkansas have reported one ore more of these cases.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mumps is a very contagious disease best known for the puffy cheeks and swollen jaw that it causes. Other symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness and loss of appetite. Symptoms typically don’t appear until more than two weeks after infection. Many people who contract the disease show few to no symptoms and often aren’t even aware they have the disease. There is no treatment, but most people will recover completely within a few weeks.

The CDC recommends that everyone born after 1957 receive the mumps vaccine. Two doses of the MMR vaccine (vaccinating against mumps, measles and rubella) is 88 percent effective in preventing mumps. Adults born before 1957 are considered immune.

For more information regarding the Arkansas mumps outbreak, please visit the Arkansas Department of Health.

For more information regarding general mumps information, please visit the CDC’s website.

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NN/LM SCR Introduces Our Emerging Technologies Coordinator: Brian Leaf

brian-leaf

The NN/LM SCR is pleased to welcome Brian Leaf to the RML. Brian will serve as the Emerging Technologies Coordinator and also as the liaison to the States of Louisiana and New Mexico.

Prior to working for the South Central Region, Brian served as the Instructional Design Librarian at The Ohio State University (OSU) for the past five years. While there, he contributed to a variety of instructional projects, facilitated workshops for faculty/staff/students, and served as a consultant on pedagogical issues. In this role, he also worked across departments to enhance teaching and learning, which included anything from revising an instructional grant program to producing educational multimedia works for exhibits. Last but not least, he helped lead and grow the interdisciplinary OSU Digital Storytelling Program through outreach and program development.

Brian completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Washington in Seattle and graduate work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. During his time in Chapel Hill, he worked as a graduate research assistant to Dr. Joanne Marshall and had the opportunity to help with the Value of Library and Information Services in Patient Care study.

In 2013, he was awarded the OSU University Libraries Teaching Excellence Annual Award for his work redesigning credit courses offered through the library. He is also an alumni of the American Library Association’s 2010 Spectrum Leadership Institute as well as the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Career Enhancement Program. Currently, he serves on the Executive Board of the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association.

Brian is very excited to join the NN/LM SCR in enhancing public health and access to health information.

Contact Brian at Brian.Leaf@unthsc.edu.

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Resources for Flu 2016

“Flu vs Cold” from CDC.

Flu vs. Cold ChartWith flu season really starting to kick in, we wanted to share some resources on the disease to help you get through fall and winter!

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that every person aged six months and older get an annual flu vaccine by the end of October. Something important to note is that only injectable flu vaccines are recommended this year. Previously, the flu vaccine was also available through a nasal spray known as FluMist.

To further protect yourself, the CDC recommends staying away from people who are sick—people who are sick with the flu should stay home from work or school to prevent spreading the disease. Additionally, the CDC recommends consistent hand washing to get rid of germs.

Flu 2016 symptoms include:

  • fever or feeling feverish/chills
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • runny or stuffy nose
  • muscle or body aches
  • headaches
  • fatigue
  • vomiting or diarrhea in some cases

The CDC also has a chart that shows the difference between cold and flu symptoms.

If you suspect you have the flu, you should visit your doctor for a diagnosis and to be prescribed antiviral prescription drugs. This treatment works best when started within 48 hours of getting sick, so you should see a doctor right away if you experience symptoms.

To read more about the 2016 flu, please visit the CDC’s flu page.

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Meet Me Monday: Mandie Mims, TWU – Dallas Center Library

Mandie Mims, Reference Librarian, TWU - Dallas Center Library

Mandie Mims is the Occupational and Physical Therapy, Speech Pathology, and Health Systems Management Librarian at Texas Woman’s University, T. Boone Pickens Institute of Health Sciences – Dallas Center Library.

Mandie works primarily with graduate, PhD and post-professional students. She also work closely with faculty, supporting their research and publishing. Dallas Center is one of two Institute of Health Sciences Centers, with the other located in Houston.

Please visit TWU T. Boone Pickens Institute of Health Sciences – Dallas Center and Dallas Center Library for more information!

 

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Zika Testing in the Rio Grande Valley

“Photo” by Freeimages9 is licensed under CC0.

Mosquito

Earlier this week, we posted a feature as part of our SCR Regional Highlight series about the new medical school that opened in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas and how it will bring more physicians to a part of Texas that is in dire need of more medical professionals.

Today, we are sharing some more health news relevant to the Rio Grande Valley—this time regarding Zika.

Texas, particularly the southernmost tip where the Rio Grande Valley is, has been monitored closely for signs of local Zika transmission. Previously, Texas has seen the local transmission of dengue fever and chikungunya virus, both mosquito-borne diseases. So far, Texas has seen 231 cases of illness due to Zika, but none due to local transmission.

Despite this, the Texas Department of State Health Services is still on the offensive and is urging residents, particularly pregnant women, of the Rio Grande Valley to get tested for Zika if they exhibit any two of the four major symptoms of Zika, which include fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (eye redness), regardless of their travel history.

To read more about Zika testing recommendations, please visit Texas Department of State Health Services.

To read more about Zika, please visit Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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SCR Regional Highlight: New Medical School in the Rio Grande Valley Will Help Address Physician Shortage

UTRGV Photo by Paul Chouy

UTRGV Family Medicine Center

The Rio Grande Valley, made up of four counties in the southernmost part of Texas along the border of Mexico, has the odds stacked against it when it comes to residents’ health. In Hidalgo County, one of those four counties, 40 percent of residents lack proper health insurance, 40 percent are considered obese, and 25 percent suffer from diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, most often found in adults, is being found more often in children in this area.

Luckily though, it looks like the Rio Grande Valley has a happy ending.

On June 27, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine opened its doors to its inaugural class. This first cohort contains 55 students—out of the more than 2,784 that applied. UTRGV is the first of its kind in the Valley, but the necessity it provides has been a long time coming.

In 2013, there were only 165 doctors per 100,000 people in Texas—much lower than the average of 240 doctors per 100,000 people in the U.S. as a whole. But in the Rio Grande Valley, that number was even smaller with only 124 doctors per 100,000 people. Number of doctors wasn’t the only shortcoming the Valley had; its average physician age was 57, decades above the median population age, and with older physicians, that would mean more retirements, and it would be likely the number of doctors would dwindle even further.

The inauguration of UTRGV is a fresh start for the Valley, who often lost many of its youngest, brightest minds to other medical schools without the thought of returning. The new medical school will bring new students in and keep students here to serve the population they also grew up in.

To read more about health in the Rio Grande Valley or UTRGV, please visit the following:

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