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Archive for the ‘Resources’ Category

SCR Regional Highlight: University of Arkansas assists displaced Marshall Islands community

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

The Marshall Islands – Majuro – Window by Stefan Lins is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

marshall islands

In the Pacific Ocean near the equator and just west of the international dateline, there is a small country known as the Marshall Islands, which has a population of 53,000 inhabitants. Somewhat similarly, if you head to Springdale, Arkansas, located in the northwest corner of the state, you will find not only the Consulate of the Marshall Islands, but the largest community of Marshallese Americans in the continental U.S., with an estimated population between 6,000 and 14,000.

The Marshall Islands have become a place of despair and great poverty. It was the site of 67 nuclear tests that occurred over a 12-year period; in 1956, the Marshall Islands was called “the most contaminated place on Earth” by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

In 1986, after the war had ended, the Marshall Islands became their own fully sovereign nation, but also became a U.S. Associated State, receiving assistance from the U.S., and also allowing Marshallese to travel and work within the U.S. without a visa. Springdale, Arkansas became the best immigration option after the first Marshallese to arrive, John Moody, sent back word about jobs available at Tyson Foods, where the company is headquartered.

And while 1,000s of Marshallese traveled halfway across the world to to escape the poverty and health issues, they are still plagued by diseases including diabetes, heart disease and cancer, some of which stem from the nuclear tests, but others that occurred after the fact; like how U.S. food aid to the Marshall Islands came in the form of processed items, which have contributed to the diabetes among the population as well as obesity.

Besides having a general distrust for health professionals, causing them not to seek medical treatment, many Marshallese also have no way to afford it, as the U.S. rescinded Medicaid and Medicare following the original 1986 agreement, leaving many without any form of health insurance.

But there is some hope for the Marshallese in Springdale, Arkansas. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Library has begun a program to assist those displaced Marshallese, in part through funding by NNLM SCR. By teaching classes to Marshallese health workers and raising awareness for the health literacy information available, UAMS hopes to be able to eventually improve the overall health of the Marshallese of Northwest Arkansas. It will just take time.

To read more about the Marshallese population in Springdale, please visit “For Pacific Islanders, Hopes and Troubles in in Arkansas.”

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January is Birth Defects Prevention Month

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Untitled by Tim Bish is licensed under CC0.

yawning babyJanuary is Birth Defects Prevention Month and several states in our region want to inform residents about what can be done. In the U.S., birth defects affect 1 in 33 babies and cause 1 in 5 infant deaths every year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN).

The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH), in partnership with NBDPN, hopes to raise awareness for infections like cytomegalovirus (CMV), which can cause birth defects.

CMV is a common infection which affects more than half of U.S. adults by age 40 and which often doesn’t make those who are infected ill. However, if a pregnant women gets the infection, it can spread to the unborn child, called congenital CMV. Only about 1 in 150 babies is born with congenital CMV; however, 1 in 5 of these babies will experience long-term health problems, such as hearing loss, vision loss or cerebral palsy, among others.

Pregnant women will often contract CMV from young children, which is passed through saliva or urine. Regular hand washing, as well as not sharing utensils or cups is a good way to prevent spreading CMV.

The Texas Department of State Health Services (TSDHS) on the other hand promotes a more general approach to Birth Defects Awareness Month, sharing information related to the 2017 theme: “Prevent to Protect: Prevent Infections for Baby’s Protection.” Tips include properly preparing food, seeing a doctor regularly, protecting oneself from Zika-carrying mosquitoes and maintaining good hygiene.

To read more information about National Birth Defects Month, please visit NBDPN’s website.

To read more information from OSDH, please visit “Prevent to Protect: Prevent Infections for Baby’s Protection.”

To read more information from TDSHS, please visit “January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month.”

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Big Data and e-Science Basics

Wednesday, January 18th, 2017

The terms Big Data and e-Science are increasingly used in a multitude of forums. Many of us are inundated with these terms at work and they are increasingly talked about in the media. But what do they mean? The Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative has been featured here before and the ongoing webinar series on Fridays are a great resource.

But sometimes it is helpful to return to the basics.

So what is Big Data? It is more than just a large count. Big Data represents the full range of challenges and complexities created by the vast amounts of data and data sources that the research community is now collecting and using.

For a basic primer on Big Data, visit the BD2K explanation. For librarians and other information specialists there is also a valuable resource in the e-Science Portal for Librarians. This resource is created and managed by the NN/LM New England Region. This portal serves as an excellent resource to foster learning and collaboration in e-Science while providing e-Science education for librarians.

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

Untitled by Liam Welch is licensed under CC0.

close up of eyeDid you know more than 3 million people in the U.S. are affected by glaucoma? Do you know what glaucoma is?

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye’s optic nerve, the part of the eye that connects it’s to the brain. When damaged, it can cause vision loss, and in fact, glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in the United States, according to MedlinePlus.

Everyone is at risk for glaucoma, but there are certain groups of people who should be more aware of potentially contracting the disease—mainly seniors. Those over age 60 should get an eye exam every two years. Additionally, African Americans over age 40 and those with a family history of glaucoma should also get checked regularly, as they are more at risk.

Glaucoma symptoms vary, and those with the disease may experience none. But over time they may notice a loss of peripheral vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, nausea, blurred vision, halos around lights and/or reddening of eyes.

There is no cure for glaucoma, but it can usually be controlled, especially when caught early on. Current treatments include prescription eye drops and surgery.

This January, recognize National Glaucoma Awareness Month by considering getting an annual eye exam.

To read more about glaucoma, please visit “Glaucoma Resources for Special Populations from National Library of Medicine,” and/or MedlinePlus.

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Finding Information about Integrative and Complementary Medicine

Saturday, December 26th, 2015

The NN/LM SCR offers a popular class entitled “Will Duct Tape Cure My Warts? Examining Complementary and Alternative Medicine” that covers the history and statistics about complementary and integrative medicine, as well as the best resources to find information about these therapies and practices.

The authoritative website is the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), from the National Institutes of Health. Formerly called the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, it underwent a name change in December 2014 in order to reflect the Center’s research commitment to studying promising health approaches already in use by the American public.

The National Library of Medicine’s premiere consumer health website, MedlinePlus, is another excellent resource on this topic. MedlinePlus has a health topics page for Complementary and Integrative Medicine with several links to the NCCIH as well as to other authoritative organizations’ websites.

For finding research articles from medical journals, the NCCIH has partnered with PubMed on an automatic “complementary and alternative medicine” search filter, called “CAM on PubMed®.” When you type your search topic into this filter, PubMed will automatically retrieve scientific research articles in the area of complementary and integrative medicines.

So enjoy learning about acupuncture, magnets, zinc and everything in between! Keep an eye out for our “Will Duct Tape Cure My Warts?” class as a possible future activity, which we teach both in person and online via Moodle.

A Year of Health Calendar – Free Download/Order

Saturday, December 19th, 2015

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the NIH, has developed a set of 2016 health planners – A Year of Health – tailored for four multicultural communities as part of its National Multicultural Outreach Initiative. The Hispanic/Latino Health Planner is also bilingual! An organization can order up to 150 copies of the health planner free of charge for their communities, while supplies last.

NIAMS is prAsian amerian health planneroviding also some great images you can use in their social media toolkit for promotional purposes and have offered the following tweets:

  • Each day is a chance to get healthier. Order your free 2016 health planners from @NIH_NIAMS today! http://1.usa.gov/1FU4Hh2 #NMOI2016
  • Have you thought about your #health goals for 2016? @NIH_NIAMS can help with free 2016 health planners http://1.usa.gov/1FU4Hh2 #NMOI2016

The 2016 A Year of Health planners offer information on staying healthy and managing conditions of the bones, joints, muscles, skin, and pain based on proven studies. The planners also include information about other free publications that you can order or download if you want to find out more.

PubMed for Nurses: New Tutorial Available

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

The PubMed for Nurses Tutorial is available now from the PubMed Online Training page on the National Library of Medicine Web site. This tutorial was created specifically to help nurses efficiently find literature using PubMed. Its concise, targeted content consists of five videos with exercises to test your knowledge. The tutorial was designed to be completed in less than 30 minutes.

The PubMed for Nurses Tutorial was researched, designed and developed by Megan Kellner from Maryland’s iSchool, the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, in consultation with nurses and librarians who serve nurses around the United States.

nurse sitting at computer

Instructional Design for Medical Librarians webinar

Monday, December 7th, 2015

Our staff attended the Medical Library Association‘s recent webinar, entitled “Instructional Design for Medical Librarians.” Max Anderson, instructional designer at University of Illinois–Chicago (UIC) presented on instructional design principles, technologies, resources and tools.

A graduate of the University of North Texas’ Master of Science in Learning Technologies, Anderson gave a background of learning theories (of which there are hundreds) including the most popular, the ADDIE model. He also discussed Richard Mayer‘s instructional design principles. Anderson described his experiences working with his faculty at UIC and the opportunities and challenges that presented.

Several resources for lecture capture were highlighted such as: Explain Everything (Anderson’s favorite), ShowMe, both mobile apps; and for laptop/desktop: Reflector, Camtasia, and Captivate.

Be sure to watch MLA’s continuing education page for its upcoming webinar offerings! Typically, local health science libraries serve as host for these valuable continuing education opportunities.

Introducing iOS Educational Apps for Students from the National Library of Medicine

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

The National Library of Medicine‘s (NLM) Division of Specialized Information Services is pleased to announce the launch of three interactive, educational iOS (iPhone, iPad) apps for middle/high school students studying biology, chemistry and environmental health.

  • Bohr Thru: This Candy Crush style game requires users to collect and organize protons, neutrons and electrons in order to form the Bohr Model first 18 elements on the periodic table, such as Carbon, Nitrogen and Lithium. With the help of the main character, Atom, players become familiar with a variety of chemical elements and their structures. Teachers can easily implement short, in-class game sessions to enhance their students’ understanding of the periodic table as well. Visit the NLM’s ChemIDplus for more information on over 400,000 chemicals. (Install Bohr Thru)

  • Base Chase: Learning the bases of DNA has never been as easy with this fast paced, educational app. Players grab bases of DNA in order to complete unique DNA strands for a variety of animals. DeeNA, the game’s cartoon mascot, assists players in completing each of the required tasks. A helpful video tutorial is accessible once the game is successfully downloaded. This resource goes hand-in-hand with the NLM’s GeneEd website. (Install Base Chase)

  • Run4Green: The importance of environmental conservation is reinforced through this interactive, Mario-style game. Topics, such as greenhouse gas reduction, renewable energies and green product purchases are emphasized throughout game play. Playing as a jolly, green and earth-shaped character, users collect coins and perform environmentally friendly tasks. The game is appropriate for students in grades 5-8. More information linking middle school classroom science to environmental health can be found on the NLM Environmental Health Student Portal. (Install Run4Green)

Visit the NLM K-12 homepage for additional resources and view the NLM’s iTunes page for other great NLM apps!

Run4green app

Run4Green app

Coping with Disastrous Events

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

Here are some resources to aid in coping with recent traumatic events.

Disaster Distress Helpline: 1-800-985-5990 FREE

The helpline is also available in Spanish, by text and by TTY.

National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus: Coping with Disasters English and Spanish

National Traumatic Child Stress Network:

Restoring a Sense of Safety in the Aftermath of a Mass Shooting: Tips for Parents and Professionals

Coping with Crisis – Helping Children With Special Needs

Facing Fear: Helping Young People Deal with Terrorism and Tragic Events – for ages 5 to 7.

Activity Book for African American Families: Helping Children Cope with Crisis