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Archive for the ‘NIH’ Category

Tracking Fitness and Change

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

“Heart Rate Monitoring Device” by pearlsband is licensed under CC0.

fitnessbandsAccording to a 2013 Pew report, 60% of U.S. adults ages 18 and over nationally track their weight, diet, or exercise routine, and 21% of all adults surveyed use technology to do so.  Fitness and activity trackers such as Fitbit or Nike+ can certainly help with setting goals or finding extra motivation.

But how effective are these technologies? Recent studies reported by The Guardian show promising results in terms of retention. But lasting change takes more than a device.

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, part of the National Institute of Health, published a guide to help consumers think about how to move through stages of change:

  1. Contemplation – thinking about making a change
  2. Preparation – planning and goal setting
  3. Action – making actual adjustments or changes
  4. Maintenance – finding a routine and overcoming setbacks

Want more information on how to execute each stage and overcome common barriers? Check out the guide here: Changing Your Habits for Better Health. You can also find additional resources for tracking progress and developing health habits on the MedlinePlus topical page on Exercise and Physical Fitness.

And then here are are some considerations if you’re in the market for a fitness tracker: Consumer Reports Fitness Tracker Buying Guide. But whether you use a high-tech gadget or a paper journal, consider what makes for lasting change!

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Requirements for Clinical Trials Reporting Set to Change in January

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

“Photo” by DarkoStojanovic is licensed under CC0.

Stethoscope

In 1996, a federal law was passed that required the registration of clinical trials that were investigating drugs or devices regulated by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). As part of this legislation, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) were charged with developing a publicly searchable repository in an attempt to combat publication bias, attempts by pharmaceutical companies to hide negative results, and any adverse events. Out of this, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) developed ClinicalTrials.gov. However, a recent article has shown that even NIH researchers have not been compliant with the laws already in place.

On September 16th, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the Final Rule in regards to clinical trials results reporting. This new regulation applies to any clinical trial including those funded solely by private companies. Additionally, the Final Rule requires more detailed information be uploaded to ClinicalTrials.gov within one year of the end of data collection.

Additionally, the NIH released a supplementary policy that expands the requirements for those trials funded by the NIH. This new policy makes changes to how grants can be submitted, what format they may be submitted in, required submission components, and reporting requirements in ClinicalTrials.gov. One of the biggest changes that the NIH Policy makes is expanding these requirements to all clinical trials no matter what stage of research or the presence of medical components. This means that many behavioral intervention trials will now be required to comply with the much higher rigor and oversight of a medical intervention.

These changes take effect January 18, 2017. It will be interesting to see if this can change the compliance issues that have plagued ClinicalTrials.gov for years.

For more information see the full HHS rule, the NIH Commentary in JAMA, and the history of ClinicalTrials.gov.

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-Written by Bethany Livingston, Research Administrator, NN/LM SCR

Single IRB Policy to Streamline Reviews of Multi-Site Research

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

Accelerating clinical research studies benefits researchers, research participants, and all who stand to gain from research results. Today, the time it takes to go from a sound research idea to the launch of a new, multi-site clinical research study is too long. A major contributor to the delay is that too many institutional review boards (IRBs) are reviewing the protocol and consent documents for the same study, often with no added benefit in terms of the protections for research participants. To address this bottleneck, NIH has issued a new policy to streamline the review process for NIH-funded, multi-site clinical research studies in the United States. The NIH Policy on the Use of a Single Institutional Review Board (IRB) for Multi-Site Research (pdf) sets the expectation that multi-site studies conducting the same protocol use a single IRB to carry out the ethical review of the proposed research.

Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D.
Director, National Institutes of Health

This information was originally posted on the NIH website: https://www.nih.gov/about-nih/who-we-are/nih-director/statements/single-irb-policy-streamline-reviews-multi-site-research

Science Education Resources from the NIH

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

The 27 Institutes and Centers of the NIH fund the development of extensive science education materials for use in K-12 classrooms. Teacher and student manuals are available for many of the resources.

Examples of resources that may be integrated into the curriculum include:

The Brain: Our Sense of Self

 

The Brain: Our Sense of Self
(Grades 7-8)

A Curriculum Supplement from the National Institute
of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

This resource describes the brain functions, regional differences,
impact of spinal damage, and how the nervous system processes
information.

Activities:
1. A Difference of Mind
2. Regional Differences
3. Inside Information
4. Outside Influence
5. Our Sense of Self

 

 

Open Wide and Trek Inside!

 

Open Wide and Trek Inside!
(Grades 1-2)

A Curriculum Supplement from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

This resource goes beyond the traditional “brushing and flossing” curriculum and
focuses on the science of the oral environment,
and major scientific concepts relating to oral health.

Activities:
1. What Do Mouths Do?
2. Open Wide! What’s Inside?
3. Let’s Investigate Tooth Decay
4. What Lives Inside Your Mouth?
5. What Keeps Your Mouth Healthy?
6. What Have You Learned About the Mouth?

 

View more resources on the NIH website at https://www.nih.gov/research-training/science-education, or visit each NIH Institute or Center’s website at https://www.nih.gov/institutes-nih/list-nih-institutes-centers-offices.

 

Speaking to Diverse Communities Through HealthReach

Monday, June 13th, 2016

HealthReach LogoThe National Library of Medicine continues to provide access to health information to underserved communities through HealthReach. HealthReach is a national partnership that offers access to patient education materials in multiple languages, as well as helpful information for providers who offer services to individuals for whom English is not their native language. On the patient materials tab, users are able to search by topic, language, format, and authors. Providers are able to search by countries, populations, and authors. Materials for both audiences include audio, videos, and documents.

Resources include:

  • Health education materials in various languages and formats (brochures, fact sheets, videos)
  • Provider tools (including best practices, cultural information, and effective use of interpreters)
  • Special collections on Emergency and Disaster, Women’s Health, and Mental Health

HealthReach provides free access to high quality, culturally relevant health information. Visit https://healthreach.nlm.nih.gov/ for more information.

A portion of this entry was adapted from https://healthreach.nlm.nih.gov/

Many NIH Initiatives Featured at MLA 2016 in Toronto

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

bioCADDIEKevin B. Read shared updates on the bioCADDIE project sponsored by an NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) grant. This award is allowing a research team at UC San Diego to develop the first data discovery index that will index data stored at disparate locales. The repository is intended to ultimately serve as the ‘PubMed of data.’

Visit the bioCADDIE website for more information about the project and to view research team presentations. The upcoming bioCADDIE Workshop: Data Indexing for Data Providers will be held on June 23, 2016 in La Jolla, California.

 

NLM Pill Image Recognition Challenge Submission Ends May 31

Monday, May 16th, 2016

NLM Pill Image Recognition Challenge The NLM Pill Image Recognition Challenge submission period, which began April 4, will end at 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday May 31, 2016.

A Federal Register Notice and Submission Instructions provide further information about the Challenge. As stated in the Federal Register Notice, individuals, private entities, and teams interested in submitting must first register.

  • An individual who registers as an individual (not as part of a team) must be either a US citizen or a permanent resident of the US.
  • A private entity (for example, a company or a university) that registers must be incorporated in and maintain a primary place of business in the US.
  • If a team registers, then at least one team member must be either an individual who is a US citizen or a permanent resident of the US or a private entity that is incorporated in and maintains a primary place of business in the US.

Additional restrictions, such as for Federal employees, are in the Federal Register Notice. Only US citizens, permanent residents of the US, and entities that are incorporated in and maintain a primary place of business in the US can be eligible to win a monetary prize (in whole or in part).

There is no deadline for registering, but an individual, private entity, or team must register before making a Challenge submission.

A submission shall be a USB drive containing a Virtual Machine (VM) that arrives no later than 5:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 31, 2016, at:

Pill Image Recognition Challenge
Computational Photography Project for Pill Identification (C3PI)
National Library of Medicine
Building 38A, Room B1-N30
8600 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, MD 20894

The NLM Pill Image Recognition Challenge is a National Institutes of Health Challenge under the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science) Reauthorization Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-358).

This information was originally posted in NLM in Focus: A Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine, https://infocus.nlm.nih.gov/2016/05/03/four-weeks-left-nlm-pill-image-recognition-challenge-submission-ends-may-31/

NIH News in Health

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Check out the May issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research.

Silhouettes of a man and a woman showing the XY symbol next to the male and XX next to the female.

 

Sex and Gender
How Being Male or Female Can Affect Your Health

Men and women are similar in many ways, but sex and social factors can affect your risk for disease, your response to medications, and how often you seek medical care.

Read more about sex, gender, and health.

 

 

 


Illustration of a sheaf of wheat.

Going Gluten Free?
Necessary for Some, Optional for Others

A gluten-free diet can be a lifestyle choice for many. But for those with a condition known as celiac disease, it’s a medical necessity.

Read more about gluten and celiac disease.

 

 

 

To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark https://www.nih.gov/health-information.

 

NIH News In Health February 2016

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Adapted from: NIH News in Health, February 2016 issue

Check out the February issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark http://health.nih.gov.

 

Technologies Enhance Tumor Surgery Helping Surgeons Spot and Remove Cancer NIH-funded researchers are developing new technologies to help surgeons figure out exactly where cancerous tumors end and healthy tissue begins. Read more about technologies for cancer surgery.
 
Focusing on Fibromyalgia A Puzzling and Painful Condition Fibromyalgia is a long-term condition marked by pain and fatigue. It can be hard to diagnose, but treatment can help. Read more about fibromyalgia.

Health Capsules:

Infertility Treatments and Children’s Development

Help for Rare and Undiagnosed Conditions

Featured Website: NIH Office of Dietary Supplements 

Please NIH’s website http://www.nih.gov/ for current authoritative health information.

 

NIH Genome Sequencing Program targets the Genomic Bases of common, Rare disease

Wednesday, January 27th, 2016

The National Institutes of Health will fund a set of genome sequencing and analysis centers whose research will focus on understanding the genomic bases of common and rare human diseases. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of NIH, January 14, 2016 launched the Centers for Common Disease Genomics (CCDG), which will use genome sequencing to explore the genomic contributions to common diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke and autism. NHGRI also announced the next phase of a complementary program, the Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMG), which will continue investigating the genomic underpinnings of rare, typically inherited diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. “Advances in DNA sequencing are creating tremendous new opportunities for exploring how the genome plays a role in human disease,” said NHGRI Director Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D. “Our continued focus on both rare and common diseases promises to reveal important aspects about the genomic architecture of a wide range of human disorders.”CCDG researchers plan to examine a select group of disorders in order to develop approaches for using genome sequencing to study common disease more broadly. By sequencing an expected 150,000 to 200,000 genomes of individuals with these diseases, the CCDG program aims to improve understanding of how genomic differences among people influence disease risk and to develop models for future studies of common disease.

NHGRI is one of the 27 institutes and centers at the National Institutes of Health. The NHGRI Extramural Research Program supports grants for research and training and career development at sites nationwide. Additional information about NHGRI can be found at www.genome.gov.