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Archive for the ‘Louisiana’ Category

SCR Regional Highlight: Two Louisiana Cities Rank Top Five for HIV Diagnoses

Monday, March 20th, 2017

Views of the I-10 Mississippi River Bridge by Billy Metcalf Photography is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

patient

According to the 2016 America’s Health Rankings report conducted by the United Health Foundation, Louisiana is the second most unhealthy state in the nation, just behind Mississippi. The report uses a number of factors to create these rankings, but it has become increasingly clear over the years that the state’s high diagnoses of new HIV cases is one factor.

According to the most recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report leading up to World AIDS Day in 2016, Baton Rouge ranks number one for newly diagnosed HIV cases; New Orleans ranks number three. In Baton Rouge, 44.7 out of every 100,000 people is diagnosed with HIV; in New Orleans, it’s 36.9.

HIV is a virus that weakens a person’s immune system by destroying the cells that fight infection and disease. There is no cure for it. AIDS is a condition that is considered the final stage of HIV. It is most commonly transmitted sexually or through sharing syringes, but can also be spread from mother to child through pregnancy as well as several other less common ways.

To combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic prevalent in the state, the Louisiana Department of Health launched the STD/HIV Program, designed to prevent transmission, ensure the availability of medical services and track the impact.

Unfortunately one of the biggest barriers health officials face is the stigma around the disease and an unwillingness to seek out treatment and report it. Timothy Young, head of the HIV/AIDS Alliance in the Baton Rouge area told The Advocate in a 2015 articlefear of being associated with HIV is so pronounced that more than 25 percent of those who are newly diagnosed with the disease in Louisiana have already progressed to AIDS.”

It’s important for these people to know that HIV/AIDS treatment has only continued to get better and it’s no longer the death sentence it used to be, if you get tested.

To read more about the SHP program, please visit the Louisiana Department of Health’s website.

To read more general information about HIV/AIDS, please visit the CDC’s website.

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Louisiana Sees More Cases of West Nile Virus

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

“Photo” by FotoshopTofs
is licensed under CC0.

Mosquito

The Louisiana Department of Health reported this week that it has seen 36 cases of West Nile virus in Louisiana so far in 2016. Six more cases were reported within the last two weeks.

Of those diagnosed with West Nile virus, 15 were asymptomatic or fever cases, a mild illness. Twenty-one were neuroinvasive, a very severe case which can lead to brain damage and even death.

Like Zika virus, West Nile virus is a mosquito-transmitted disease. Many people (70 – 80 percent according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) who contract the disease do not experience any symptoms. However, symptoms do include, fever, headache, body aches, joint aches, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, neck stiffness, tremors, seizure, paralysis, disorientation and coma.

Currently there is no vaccine or specific treatment for West Nile virus. The CDC recommends over-the-counter painkillers or hospitalization if symptoms are severe.

The primary way to prevent West Nile virus is to protect yourself from mosquitos. This can be done by using insect repellent and wearing long sleeves and pants.

For more information regarding West Nile virus in Louisiana, please visit the Louisiana Department of Health’s website.

For more general information regarding West Nile virus, please visit the CDC’s website.

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NN/LM SCR Introduces Our Emerging Technologies Coordinator: Brian Leaf

Wednesday, October 26th, 2016

brian-leaf

The NN/LM SCR is pleased to welcome Brian Leaf to the RML. Brian will serve as the Emerging Technologies Coordinator and also as the liaison to the States of Louisiana and New Mexico.

Prior to working for the South Central Region, Brian served as the Instructional Design Librarian at The Ohio State University (OSU) for the past five years. While there, he contributed to a variety of instructional projects, facilitated workshops for faculty/staff/students, and served as a consultant on pedagogical issues. In this role, he also worked across departments to enhance teaching and learning, which included anything from revising an instructional grant program to producing educational multimedia works for exhibits. Last but not least, he helped lead and grow the interdisciplinary OSU Digital Storytelling Program through outreach and program development.

Brian completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Washington in Seattle and graduate work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. During his time in Chapel Hill, he worked as a graduate research assistant to Dr. Joanne Marshall and had the opportunity to help with the Value of Library and Information Services in Patient Care study.

In 2013, he was awarded the OSU University Libraries Teaching Excellence Annual Award for his work redesigning credit courses offered through the library. He is also an alumni of the American Library Association’s 2010 Spectrum Leadership Institute as well as the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Career Enhancement Program. Currently, he serves on the Executive Board of the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association.

Brian is very excited to join the NN/LM SCR in enhancing public health and access to health information.

Contact Brian at Brian.Leaf@unthsc.edu or 817-735-2169

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Louisiana Sees Record Flooding Over Weekend

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

“A Louisiana Welcome” by
Stuart Seeger is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

Louisiana

Over the weekend, Louisiana experienced record-breaking flooding from heavy rain that has so far killed at least seven and displaced thousands. Roadways disappeared under water, houses flooded, and residents around the south of the state were forced to evacuate. Mike Steele, a spokesman for the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness reported to The New York Times that the effects the flood had on residents, and the response of emergency responders were reminiscent of Hurricane Katrina.

President Barack Obama granted Louisiana’s request for a declaration of emergency Sunday evening, and first responders were working around the clock to ensure the safety of residents. Governor John Bel Edwards said Sunday that more than 20,000 people had been rescued, but any sort of “tally was already out of date,” according to The New York Times.

While most of southern Louisiana is prone to, and used to, heavy rain and at times, flooding, because this sort of downfall is unprecedented, Edwards said the National Weather Service can’t tell anyone what else you can expect or how else to prepare.

To read more about the floods in Louisiana, visit “Thousands Displaced in Storm-Drenched Louisiana.”

If you’d like to find out more about the effects flooding and coastal erosion have had on Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, read our new SCR Regional Highlight series available on the SCR blog.

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Louisiana Flood Emergency Information

Monday, August 15th, 2016

In response to the current flooding in Louisiana and other parts of the NN/LM South Central Region, we’ve created a Flooding and Disaster Information Resources webpage with information to help you stay safe during this weather emergency.

If you have questions or need assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us at 817-735-2223 or nnlm-scr@unthsc.edu.

 

SCR Regional Highlight: America’s First “Climate Refugees”

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

“Isle De Jean Charles” by Karen Apricot
is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

Isle De Jean Charles - Blue House

Isle de Jean Charles is a tiny, narrow island deep in the bayous of Louisiana. The single-lane “Island Road” is the only land method of transportation to and from the island but is often impassible during times of high water. It has been the home to the Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Indians for more than 170 years—but not for much longer.

Coastal erosion, severe storms, rising sea levels, and poor oil extraction practices have caused the island to literally sink into the Gulf of Mexico. Current island residents remember when Isle de Jean Charles was 5 miles wide. But with 98 percent of it lost since 1955, the island is now only a mere 1/4 mile in width. Southern Louisiana as a whole, actually, is the fastest disappearing landmass on earth.

Edison Dardar, one of the current residents, explains in The New York Times’ mini-documentary “Vanishing Island” that he remembers when there were 250, maybe even 300 homes, on the island years ago. Since the hurricanes have scared most families off, there are now maybe 20 left. Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav and Ike severely damaged the infrastructure of the island causing many families to flee.

Since 2010, Chief Albert Naquin and tribal leaders, realizing the island they and their ancestors have called home for almost two centuries won’t be around for much longer, have been trying to create a solution by finding a way to relocate the remaining 77 residents. After working with the Lowlander Center for more than five years, they finally received some good news.

In January, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced it would grant more than $1 billion in total to 13 communities who have been impacted by major disasters between 2011 and 2013 through the Housing and Urban Development’s National Disaster Resilience Competition Grant. The grant to assist the community of the Isle de Jean Charles is something new, however. Never before have federal tax dollars been used to relocate an entire community struggling with the effects of climate change. This is a big step for Naquin and island residents — the grant allocates more than $92 million to the state of Louisiana to be split between one other project, the Louisiana Strategic Adaptations for Future Environments Program.

“Isle De Jean Charles” by Karen Apricot
is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Isle De Jean Charles - Ruined House

Now Naquin and tribal leaders face a new challenge, relocating those residents who still want to stay. Isle de Jean Charles residents have varying views when it comes to resettlement. Some are excited to leave the disappearing island behind; others are afraid they will lose their culture if they move away. While the exact path of resettlement for Isle de Jean Charles is still uncertain, the tribe could relocate as early as 2019.

It’s also important to note that Isle de Jean Charles is not the only community dealing with the consequences of climate change; The New York Times reported that 50 million to 200 million people could be displaced because of climate change by 2050. While Isle de Jean Charles residents may be the first climate refugees, they certainly will not be the last.

To learn more about the Island’s history, visit isledejeancharles.com.

Watch the mini-documentary “Vanishing Island” produced by The New York Times.

To learn more about the Housing and Urban Development’s National Disaster Resilience Competition Grant, please visit hud.gov.

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Written by Sara Goodwin, NN/LM SCR

Resource Library Spotlight: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Libraries – New Orleans

Friday, March 18th, 2016

Last week, I attended the Louisiana Library Association Conference. Being a Baton Rouge native, I couldn’t resist the opportunity to come home, learn and fellowship with former colleagues. While I was there, I had a chance to speak with Director of Libraries, Debbie Sibley and Reference/Outreach Librarian, Carolyn Bridgewater of LSU Health Sciences Center Libraries – New Orleans. Both exhibited at the conference on behalf of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine/South Central Region. It was truly a pleasure speaking with them. Great job!!

LLA Conference

Job Ad: Digital & Information Services Librarian, LSU Health Shreveport

Friday, January 29th, 2016

View this posting on the LSU Health Shreveport HR website

Digital and Information Services Librarian, Medical Library
Posted Date: 1/28/2016
Position Number: 28235
Salary Range: Negotiable
Location: LSU Health Shreveport
Posting open until filled

Minimum Qualifications:

Required: Master’s degree in Library or Information Science from an American Library Association (ALA)-accredited institution. Experience in searching health sciences information databases. Must have excellent communication and interpersonal skills, ability to work in a team-oriented, collaborative environment, problem solving ability, excellent computer skills, and ability to work effectively with colleagues, students, faculty, and staff.

Desired: Experience in a library, preferably in a health sciences environment. Familiarity or experience with systematic reviews. Academy of Health Information Professionals credentialing. Ability to assist with a writing consultation service. Familiarity with genetic and/or molecular databases. Willingness to learn new technologies.

Job Summary:

The Department of Medical Library Science is seeking an enthusiastic, innovative librarian and expert searcher to assist faculty, researchers, and students with their information needs through literature searching, participation in morning report, and teaching information appraisal skills. This is a full-time faculty position, tenure-track if appointed at assistant librarian/assistant professor level or higher. The person in this position designs courses and/or tutorials, teaches audiences of varying education levels, provides outreach, serves as a liaison to other departments, and provides assistance with writing. Broad professional responsibilities include writing grant proposals, participation in professional associations which support library and information science or health care, participation in pertinent continuing education opportunities, conducting research and publishing.

The Library staff is a congenial and diverse group, always seeking new and improved ways to provide services and resources.

To Apply:

​Applicants should submit CV and three letters of reference to the Faculty Staffing Office at LSU Health Shreveport via email to: ShvFacultyRecruitment@lsuhsc.edu or by mail to the address below.

LSU Health Shreveport
Department of Human Resource Management
Attn: Faculty Recruitment
1501 Kings Highway, P.O. Box 33932
Shreveport, LA 71130-3932

We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

MLA Data Visualization Webinar October 28

Monday, October 19th, 2015

NIH Library Research Data Informationist Lisa Federer, MLIS, MA, AHIP, will give a presentation on data visualization skills and tools for librarians Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 12:00-1:30pm Mountain, 1:00-2:30pm, Central Time. See full webinar description at http://www.mlanet.org/p/bl/et/blogid=61&blogaid=643.

Because the National Library of Medicine sees this as a strategic growth area for health sciences libraries, the NN/LM SCR Administrative Office is funding several sites throughout the South Central Region including:

See a recent blog post from Lisa Federer’s blog titled, “See One, Do One, Teach One: Data Science Instruction Edition.”

SCR Exhibiting at AHIMA in New Orleans Sept. 26-30, 2015

Monday, September 28th, 2015

NN/LM SCR Coordinators Michele Woods and Marcus Spann are exhibiting at the American Health Information Management Association annual convention this week in New Orleans, LA, along with Tulane University Rudolph Matas Library for the Health Sciences Public Health Librarian Elaine Hicks.

AHIMA is the premier association of health information management (HIM) professionals worldwide. Serving 52 affiliated component state associations and more than 101,000 health information professionals, it is recognized as the leading source of “HIM knowledge,” a respected authority for rigorous professional education and training.

exhibiting at AHIMA

Left to right: Michele Woods, Elaine Hicks and Marcus Spann