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Archive for the ‘Health Literacy’ Category

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

Untitled by Liam Welch is licensed under CC0.

close up of eyeDid you know more than 3 million people in the U.S. are affected by glaucoma? Do you know what glaucoma is?

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye’s optic nerve, the part of the eye that connects it’s to the brain. When damaged, it can cause vision loss, and in fact, glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in the United States, according to MedlinePlus.

Everyone is at risk for glaucoma, but there are certain groups of people who should be more aware of potentially contracting the disease—mainly seniors. Those over age 60 should get an eye exam every two years. Additionally, African Americans over age 40 and those with a family history of glaucoma should also get checked regularly, as they are more at risk.

Glaucoma symptoms vary, and those with the disease may experience none. But over time they may notice a loss of peripheral vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, nausea, blurred vision, halos around lights and/or reddening of eyes.

There is no cure for glaucoma, but it can usually be controlled, especially when caught early on. Current treatments include prescription eye drops and surgery.

This January, recognize National Glaucoma Awareness Month by considering getting an annual eye exam.

To read more about glaucoma, please visit “Glaucoma Resources for Special Populations from National Library of Medicine,” and/or MedlinePlus.

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Tuberculosis Diagnoses Increase for First Time in 23 Years

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

“Photo” by WikiImages is licensed under CC0.

syringe

While you may not think tuberculosis (TB) is a concern for yourself and your family, many people in the U.S. suffer with it, and for the first time in 23 years, the U.S. saw an increase in diagnosed cases in 2015. There were 9,557 cases total and it affected 27 states and the District of Columbia, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

This increase calls for a more comprehensive public health approach to curbing TB, according to the CDC’s report. Suggested strategies according to the report are:

  • “Increased testing and treatment of latent (showing no symptoms) TB,
  • Greater efforts to reach populations most affected by TB, and
  • Reducing TB transmission through effective diagnostic and treatment strategies.”

TB is a bacterium that usually affects the lungs but can affect any part of the body. It is usually spread through the air when a person throat coughs, speaks or sings and another person breaths it in. But not everyone who becomes infected will become sick, which is called latent TB infection. This occurs when your body is able to fight off the bacteria.

Primary TB symptoms include a cough that last as for three weeks or longer, pain in the chest, and coughing up blood. Others may also include weight loss, fatigue, no appetite, chills, fever and sweating at night.

To read more from the recent CDC report, please visit “Burden of TB in the United States.”

To read more general information about TB, please visit the CDC’s website.

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Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign (OHEC)

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

“Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign”
from okhealthequity.org.

Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign Logo

October is National Health Literacy Month! Did you know there’s a campaign that addresses health inequities in Oklahoma?

Through the Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign (OHEC), community leaders and organizations have come together to provide resources aiming to give an opportunity for Oklahomans to reach their full health potential regardless of their social position. Resources include a Health Literacy Clearinghouse with links to toolkits, resources for patients, research and reports, health literacy assessments and training, and multimedia presentations.

Community partners include the Oklahoma Literacy Coalition, Tulsa Hispanic Resource Association, Rogers County Literary Council, and the Latino Community Development Agency.

For more information, please visit the Health Literacy Clearinghouse.

Follow the Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign on Twitter and like them on Facebook.

-Written by Myriam Martinez-Banuelos, Consumer Health Outreach Coordinator, NN/LM SCR

National Library of Medicine Announces MedPix®, Free Online Medical Image Database

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

Adapted from:  National Library of Medicine’s News and Events dated 2/05/16

The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. The URL is https://medpix.nlm.nih.gov/.

The foundation for MedPix was a radiology study tool that was originally developed by Dr. J.G. Smirniotopoulos in 1984. In the early 1990s, as radiology was moving from film to digital imaging, there was simultaneously a merger of the diagnostic imaging residency programs of the two premier military hospitals: Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center. In the summer of 1999, a Web-based digital teaching file based on the radiology study tool was built at USUHS to allow the two military training programs to share teaching file cases, a training requirement. Soon, other military hospitals and several civilian institutions joined MedPix. Over the past 16 years, MedPix has amassed an impressive collection of over 53,000 images from over 13,000 cases.

The MedPix collection categorizes and classifies the image and patient data for each of several subsets of image database applications (e.g. radiology, pathology, ophthalmology, etc.). The content material is both high-quality and high-yield and includes both common and rare conditions. Most cases have a proven diagnosis (pathology, clinical follow-up). The teaching file cases are peer-reviewed by an Editorial Panel.

As a public education service, the NLM and MedPix provide the storage service, indexing, and Web server hosting. Individuals as well as institutions may participate. Contributed content may be copyrighted by the original author/contributor. No additional software required—your Internet browser is all you need!

The primary target audience includes resident and practicing physicians, medical students, nurses and graduate nursing students and other post-graduate trainees. The material is organized by disease category, disease location (organ system), and by patient profiles.

At this time, the new MedPix website is up. Existing users can login, but there is no access to CME credits yet, no new registration, no submitting a case and no search.

NOTE: MedPix provides a quick summary of medical information with images. It is not intended to be encyclopedic.

WARNING: This is not a substitute for medical advice, and the reader is responsible for confirming the accuracy of this information before beginning or changing any therapy or treatment.

For more information see:  MedPix Home Page https://medpix.nlm.nih.gov/  – NLM’s Medical Image Database

Since its founding in 1836, the National Library of Medicine https://www.nlm.nih.gov has played a pivotal role in translating biomedical research into practice and is a leader in information innovation. NLM is the world’s largest medical library, and millions of scientists, health professionals and the public around the world use NLM services every day.

 

Five Ways To Protect Your Eyes From AMD

Friday, February 12th, 2016

Adapted from:  Harvard Medical School’s This Week @ Harvard Health

amg-vision-loss-eyes-macular-degneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a condition in which the macula, the part of the eye that’s responsible for your sharpest and most detailed vision, begins to thin and break down, causing vision loss. If left untreated, it can lead to blindness.

There is no surefire way to prevent AMD. However, there are things you can do to delay its onset or reduce its severity. Here are 5 of our favorites:

  1. Smoking can speed up AMD damage. If you smoke, quit.
  2. Sunlight is thought to possibly promote AMD. Protect your eyes from the sun by wearing sunglasses and broad-brimmed hats.
  3. Research also suggests that certain nutrients help prevent macular degeneration. Eat a diet rich in fresh fruits and dark-green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, collard greens, and kale. The latter are especially rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, which are key for eye health.
  4. If you have intermediate or advanced dry AMD, or any stage of the “wet” form of AMD, ask your doctor about supplements. For example, people at high risk of developing the advanced stages of the “wet” form of AMD may lower their risk by taking high-dose combinations of antioxidant vitamins and minerals.
  5. It’s unclear whether omega-3 supplements are beneficial for AMD. But eating fish and other foods high in these nutrients may still be worthwhile for preserving optimal vision and overall good health.

For more information on keeping your eyes healthy, see The Aging Eye, a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.

 

NIH News In Health February 2016

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Adapted from: NIH News in Health, February 2016 issue

Check out the February issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark http://health.nih.gov.

 

Technologies Enhance Tumor Surgery Helping Surgeons Spot and Remove Cancer NIH-funded researchers are developing new technologies to help surgeons figure out exactly where cancerous tumors end and healthy tissue begins. Read more about technologies for cancer surgery.
 
Focusing on Fibromyalgia A Puzzling and Painful Condition Fibromyalgia is a long-term condition marked by pain and fatigue. It can be hard to diagnose, but treatment can help. Read more about fibromyalgia.

Health Capsules:

Infertility Treatments and Children’s Development

Help for Rare and Undiagnosed Conditions

Featured Website: NIH Office of Dietary Supplements 

Please NIH’s website http://www.nih.gov/ for current authoritative health information.

 

MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patient Portals and Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to Consumer Health Information

Monday, November 23rd, 2015

MedlinePlus Connect https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/connect/overview.html is a free service of the National Library of Medicine (NLM)https://www.nlm.nih.gov/, National Institutes of Health (NIH)http://www.nih.gov/ , and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov/ that links patient portals, patient health record (PHR) systems, and electronic health record (EHR) systems with IT and health providers which provide relevant, authoritative patient health information from MedlinePlus.gov https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/  at the point of need.

MedlinePlus Connect Quick Facts

Resources and News

More Information

Find out more details about how MedlinePlus Connect works https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/connect/howitworks.html, what codes it accepts, and what it looks like within an electronic health record or patient health portal.

Registration Available for WebJunction Webinar on Health Literacy (Public Health and Public Libraries: Librarians as Health Literacy First Responders)

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2015

Registration is now available for the upcoming WebJunction webinar, Public Health and Public Libraries: Librarians as Health Literacy First Responders, on October 21, 2:00-3:00 PM CST. Presenters include Lydia Collins, Consumer Health Coordinator, NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region; and Christian Minter, Nebraska/Education Coordinator, NN/LM MidContinental Region. If you are interested, please refer to the registration link for more details.

Health Literacy and Palliative Care Conference

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

Institute-of-MedicineRegistration is now open for The Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on Health Literacy’s  July 9, 2015  Health Literacy and Palliative Care Conference.

The conference will feature presentations and discussions focused on the effect of low health literacy on all aspects of palliative care- medical care for serious illness focused on symptom management and improving the quality of life.  The conference can be attended in-person or via webcast and will run from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m EST.

For a more detailed description and/or to register for the conference visit The Institute of Medicine’s Health Literacy and Palliative Care conference page.

Save the Date: Oklahoma Health Literacy Conference

Friday, April 10th, 2015

Making Info Meaningful

The first annual Making Information Meaningful conference will be held October 22-23, 2015 at the  Tulsa Tech Owasso Conference Center in Owasso, OK (Conference Website).  Using information literacy to foster critical thinking is the focus of this collaborative regional training opportunity and best practices and innovative means of instruction of the identification, location, evaluation, and effective use of information will be featured.  The conference is intended for a wide range of information professionals including academic, school, and public librarians, teachers and college/university faculty and students preparing for teaching or library careers.

Please contact Paula Settoon, Dean of Libraries, TCC at paula.settoon@tulsacc.edu or (918) 595-7461 with any questions.