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Archive for the ‘General (all entries)’ Category

Free Online Training Opportunity: Teaching Topics

Tuesday, January 5th, 2016

Reposted from:  NNLMALL announcement dated January 5, 2015.

Join members of the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) for a free, hour-long presentation that covers three teaching topics.

  1. Jessi Van Der Volgen will discuss tips and tools for creating video tutorials.
  2. Cheryl Rowan will talk about including audience culture and diversity in your training sessions.
  3. Rebecca Brown will demonstrate how to use Zaption in your online training to add interactivity to videos.

Where: Online

When: February 19, 2016 at 10:00 am PT, 11:00 am MT, noon CT, 1:00 pm ET

Registration: http://nnlm.gov/ntc/classes/register.html?schedule_id=3731

View other free training opportunities by the NTC and NN/LM at: http://nnlm.gov/training-schedule/all/NTC

MeSH Webinar: “2016 MeSH Highlights” on January 20, 2016

Tuesday, January 5th, 2016
Adapted from: NLM Technical Bulletin January 5, 2015  MeSH Webinar: “2016 MeSH Highlights” on January 20, 2016. 2016 Jan-Feb;(408):b1.
On January 20, 2016, join NLM staff for a highlights tour of the 2016 Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). A 30-minute presentation will feature a MeSH tree clean-up project; a new Clinical Study publication type; changes to the trees for diet, food and nutrition; restructuring in pharmacology and toxicology; and new terms in psychology and health care. Following the presentation, Indexing and MeSH experts will be available to answer your questions.

Date and time: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. MT; 11:00p.m. CST

To register: Go to https://nih.webex.com/nih/onstage/g.php?MTID=e3e7492af438d67d6137642d7bd2efbe9

A recording of the presentation will be posted following the event.

For more information about 2016 MeSH, see What’s New for 2016 MeSH and the Introduction to MeSH – 2016.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine Accomplishments in 2015

Thursday, December 31st, 2015

We recently received an email from Dianne Babski, acting head of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) National Network Office, which listed some of the network’s accomplishment in 2015. There are some impressive numbers that could not have been achieved without the partnership of our valuable resource libraries in our network.

A few accomplishments in 2015 include:

  • The network increased membership to over 6,400 members (approximately 1,100 of those in the South Central region)
  • The network conducted almost 1,700 outreach activities, including training, exhibiting and conducting demonstrations.
    • NN/LM Staff and network members participated in over 30,000 training opportunities.
    • Regional Medical Library and network members conducted over 650 exhibits at the state, local and national levels.

Dianne’s email also cited some events from 2015, such as: Dr. Lindberg’s retirement from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) in March, the delivery of the future of NLM report from the advisory committee to the NIH director, and behind the scenes, migrating all our NN/LM websites to the Drupal platform!

Together, all of us in the network work to bring health information to millions of people who count on support from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. This includes healthcare providers, researchers, the general public, and librarians who know they will find quality information services when we are at their service.

Thank you from the NN/LM SCR. Here’s to a great 2016!

NNLM Logo

12 Ways to Have A Healthy Holiday Season

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

Group of people with snowmanTake steps to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy. Brighten the holidays by making your health and safety a priority. Take steps to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy—and ready to enjoy the holidays.

  1. Wash hands often to help prevent the spread of germs. It’s flu season. Wash your hands with soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds.
  2. Manage stress. Give yourself a break if you feel stressed out, overwhelmed, and out of control. Some of the best ways to manage stress are to find support, connect socially, and get plenty of sleep.
  3. Don’t drink and drive or let others drink and drive. Whenever anyone drives drunk, they put everyone on the road in danger. Choose not to drink and drive and help others do the same.
  4. Bundle up to stay dry and warm. Wear appropriate outdoor clothing: light, warm layers, gloves, hats, scarves, and waterproof boots.
  5. Be smoke-free. Avoid smoking and secondhand smoke. Smokers have greater health risks because of their tobacco use, but nonsmokers also are at risk when exposed to tobacco smoke.
  6. Fasten seat belts while driving or riding in a motor vehicle. Always buckle your children in the car using a child safety seat, booster seat, or seat belt according to their height, weight, and age. Buckle up every time, no matter how short the trip and encourage passengers to do the same.
  7. Get exams and screenings. Ask your health care provider what exams you need and when to get them. Update your personal and family history. Get insurance from the Health Insurance Marketplace if you are not insured.
  8. Get your vaccinations. Vaccinations help prevent diseases and save lives. Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine each year.
  9. Monitor children. Keep potentially dangerous toys, food, drinks, household items, and other objects out of children’s reach. Protect them from drowning, burns, falls, and other potential accidents.
  10. Practice fire safety. Most residential fires occur during the winter months, so don’t leave fireplaces, space heaters, food cooking on stoves, or candles unattended. Have an emergency plan and practice it regularly.
  11. Prepare food safely. Remember these simple steps: Wash hands and surfaces often, avoid cross-contamination, cook foods to proper temperatures and refrigerate foods promptly.
  12. Eat healthy, stay active. Eat fruits and vegetables which pack nutrients and help lower the risk for certain diseases. Limit your portion sizes and foods high in fat, salt, and sugar. Also, be active for at least 2½ hours a week and help kids and teens be active for at least 1 hour a day.

Be inspired to stay in the spirit of good health! Listen to The 12 Ways to Health  Holiday Song or a holiday health podcast.

Adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Website (CDC) http://www.cdc.gov/features/healthytips/index.html

FDA Launches precisionFDA a Cloud-Based, Portal for Scientific Collaboration and Next-Generation Sequencing

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

Adapted from: FDA Voice Blog

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday December 15, 2015 has launched the beta version of precisionFDA, its a new collaborative platform designed to foster innovation and to develop the science behind a method of “reading” DNA also known as Next-Generation Sequencing (or NGS).  Next Generation Sequencing allows scientists to compile data on a person’s exact order or sequence of DNA. The precisionFDA includes more than 20 public and private sector participants including National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and more. Dr. Francis Collins, NIH’s Director stated on https://precision.fda.gov/ that “PrecisionFDA, is a bold and innovative step towards advancing the regulatory science for precision medicine”.

PrecisionFDA allows users to access tools such as “Genome in the Bottle“https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing-technology/nist-genome-bottle-release-first-reference-material-assessing-genome, a reference sample of DNA for validating genome sequences developed by NIST. These results can be compared with results of previously validated references, and shared with other users, who can track changes and obtain immediate feedback from precisionFDA users. In FDA Voice http://blogs.fda.gov/fdavoice/, Tasha A. Kass-Hout, MD, chief informatics officer at the FDA wrote, “His hope is to grow the community of platform participants and improve the usability of precisionFDA in the coming months and years by placing the code for the precisionFDA portal on the world’s largest open source software repository, GitHub”.

 

DOCLINE Account Passwords

Friday, December 18th, 2015

Adapted from NLM:

On January 7, 2016, NLM will implement new standards for DOCLINE account passwords. Instructions on how to meet the password requirements will be emailed to all DOCLINE libraries on January 6, 2016. Please adhere and change your password on January 7 or soon after. If your password has not changed by February 1, 2016, it will be done for you. Changes to DOCLINE will not occur until January 7, therefore all passwords created before that date will fail to meet the new system requirements.

User IDs not used to log in during 2015 will be deleted on February 1, 2016. Also, libraries without active User IDs will be set to non-participant status.

If you have any questions, please contact the NN/LM SCR office at 713-799-7880 or nnlm-scr@library.tmc.edu.

PubMed for Nurses: New Tutorial Available

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

The PubMed for Nurses Tutorial is available now from the PubMed Online Training page on the National Library of Medicine Web site. This tutorial was created specifically to help nurses efficiently find literature using PubMed. Its concise, targeted content consists of five videos with exercises to test your knowledge. The tutorial was designed to be completed in less than 30 minutes.

The PubMed for Nurses Tutorial was researched, designed and developed by Megan Kellner from Maryland’s iSchool, the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, in consultation with nurses and librarians who serve nurses around the United States.

nurse sitting at computer

MLA Webinar Precision Medicine: What Is It and Why Should I Care?

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

Texas Medical Center Library hosted and I along with other Texas Medical Center Health Sciences Librarians attended the informative and thought provoking webinar entitled, “Precision Medicine:  What Is It and Why Should I Care” on December 9, 2015. Carrie Iwema, PhD, MLS, AHIP, Information Specialist in Molecular Biology for the Health Sciences Library System at the University of Pittsburgh presented on Precision Medicine. Iwema defined Precision Medicine, discussed the significance of NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative and Cohort Program, the importance of Precision Medicine now, short-term goals of utilizing Precision Medicine to target adult and pediatric cancers.  Iwema also discussed the long-term goals of NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort program which was implemented to encourage a million plus Americans to volunteer and contribute their health data over many years to improve health outcomes, fuel the development of new treatments for disease, and catalyze a new era of data-based and more precise preventive care and medical treatment. Iwema also discussed ethical, legal and social issues that arise when utilizing Precision Medicine.

  • Iwema stated that, “Precision Medicine is an  emerging approach for disease prevention and treatment that takes into account people’s individual variations in genes, environment, and lifestyle; whereas, The Precision Medicine Initiative will generate the scientific evidence needed to move the concept of precision medicine into clinical practice”.
  • The Precision Medicine Initiative was mentioned in the State of the Union address this year, President Obama announced that he’s launching the “Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) — a bold new research effort to revolutionize how we improve health and treat disease”. The PMI aims to leverage advances in genomics, emerging methods for managing and analyzing large data sets while protecting privacy, and health information technology to accelerate biomedical discoveries. The Precision Medicine Initiative will allow clinicians to structure their treatment, prevention strategies to people’s unique characteristics, including their genome sequence, microbiome composition, health history, lifestyle, and diet.
  • NIH Precision Medicine Cohort Program http://www.nih.gov/precision-medicine-initiative-cohort-program  a major  component of the President’s Precision Medicine Initiative is the development of a research cohort that will engage a million or more Americans who volunteer to contribute their health data over many years to improve health outcomes, fuel the development of new treatments for disease, and catalyze a new era of data-based and more precise preventive care and medical treatment.

Several Precision Medicine resources were also highlighted and included in the webinar such as: Genomic Discoveries to Clinical Applications:  http://blogs.cdc.gov/genomics/2015/10/29/genomic-discoveries/  , NHGRI Genetic Tests FAQ: http://www.genome.gov/19516567 , Genetic Testing Registry: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr.

Be sure to frequently peruse MLA’s Professional Development page http://www.mlanet.org/p/cm/ld/fid=43 for its upcoming webinar offerings! Typically, health science libraries serve as host for these invaluable informative webinars where you can also obtain continuing education credit.

 

NCBI Webinar: “Accessing 1000 Genomes Project Data”

Tuesday, December 8th, 2015

Adapted from the NLM Tech Bull. 2015 Nov-Dec;(407):b9.

To automatically receive the latest news and announcements regarding major changes and updates to NCBI resources and tools please see the subscribe page.

NCBI Webinar: “Accessing 1000 Genomes Project Data” on December 17, 2015

December 17, 2015, NCBI staff will demonstrate how to access 1000 Genomes data through SRA, dbVar, SNP and BioProject, as well as through tracks on annotated human sequences in the graphical sequence viewer and Variation Viewer. Attendees will also learn how to display, search, and download individual and genotype level data through the dedicated 1000 Genomes Browser that allows searching by chromosomal position, gene names and other genome markers.

Date and Time: December 17, 2015 11:00a.m. – 12:00p.m. MT; 12:00p.m.-1:00p.m. CST
Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5168155820927556866

After the live presentation, the Webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Any related materials will be accessible on the Webinars and Courses page; you can also find information about future Webinars on this page.

Special NHGRI Seminar Series: “A Quarter Century after the Human Genome Project’s Launch: Lessons beyond the Base Pairs”

Tuesday, December 1st, 2015

National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) was established originally as the National Center for Human Genome Research in 1989 to lead the International Human Genome Project. NHGRI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the nation’s medical research agency (http://www.nih.gov/about/). The Human Genome Project, which had as its primary goal the sequencing of the 3 billion DNA letters that make up the human genetic instruction book, was successfully completed in April 2003. Launched in 2012, the NHGRI History of Genomics Program aims to collect and organize historic materials related to the field of genomics and NHGRI as an organization. Efforts include digitization of relevant assets and database development, generation of oral histories chronicling the experiences of genomics leaders and NHGRI staff, production of scholarly work related to major genomics accomplishments, and expansion of the general knowledge about the history of genomics among the scholarly community and the general public. Efforts include digitization of relevant assets and database development, generation of oral histories chronicling the experiences of genomics leaders and NHGRI staff, production of scholarly work related to major genomics accomplishments, and expansion of the general knowledge about the history of genomics among the scholarly community and the general public.

SPEAKERS:

Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D., Director, National Institutes of Health. Elke Jordan, Ph.D., Former Deputy Director, National Human Genome Research Institute. Mark Guyer, Ph.D., Former Deputy Director, National Human Genome Research Institute. Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D., Director, National Human Genome Research Institute. TITLE:  “A Quarter Century after the Human Genome Project’s Launch:  Lessons Beyond the Base Pairs” DATE:  Thursday, December 3, 2015 TIME:  2:00-3:00 p.m. EST LOCATION:  National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Building 10, Lipsett Amphitheater SPONSOR:  NHGRI History of Genomics Program 

The NHGRI History of Genomics Program: An Archival and Scholarly Initiative

nih genome project

 “Courtesy: National Human Genome Research Institute”