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Archive for the ‘General (all entries)’ Category

June 21st – SCR CONNECTions: Regional Medical Library Educational Webinar

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Join us at the NN/LM SCR’s monthly webinar, SCR CONNECTions.

Next Webinar: The Greater Midwest Region (GMR) and South Central Region (SCR) of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) present the first jointly sponsored webinar in the monthly Lake Effects and SCR CONNECTions series.

Title: “Data Research Services: University of Michigan Experience”

Date: Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Time: 2:00pm – 3:00pm CDT

Description: This webinar session is focused on interviewing Jake Carlson and Marisa Conte regarding their involvement in research data services at the University of Michigan. Join us to learn how data services support interactions between scientists and librarians, and how these interactions create new opportunities for health sciences libraries. Topics covered in this webinar include: needs assessments to inform a research data service, the importance of teaching data literacy, data management requirements from funding agencies, and the value of health sciences libraries as partners in data management.

For full bios of Jake Carlson and Marisa Conte, see their profiles online:

This webinar will be available for 1 hour of Medical Library Association (MLA) Continuing Education credit and will be archived for future viewing.

To Join the Meeting

  1. Go to: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/jointwebinar/
  2. At the log in screen, choose “Enter as a Guest” and type in your name.
  3. Once the room is open, the system will provide you with a participant code and a phone number to dial-in to connect to the audio.
  4. Please use *6 to mute or unmute your phone.

Problems? Call us at 817-735-2223.

Test Your Connection

Run the Acrobat Connect Connection Test to ensure your configuration is compatible with the web meeting system. If you have problems completing the test or installing required software, please visit the Adobe Support website or call Adobe Connect Technical Support at 800-945-9120.

Oncology Data Sharing Resource CancerLinQ™ Nearing 1 Million Records

Monday, June 6th, 2016

ASCO CancerLinQOne million unique patient records from approximately 50 oncology practices are expected to be part of the CancerLinQ network by this summer. It is a benchmark indicating the broad and growing acceptance within the oncology community for an initiative that is compiling a robust database of real-world information that will be searchable, usable, and specifically designed to improve patient care. By late 2016 or early 2017, enough anonymous and aggregated data will be entered into CancerLinQ to allow searches of the entire system. Physicians will be able to compare a patient’s data against national quality standards and the experiences and outcomes of patients across the country.

Dr. Allen Lichter explained the advantages of utilizing the CancerLinQ system to physicians attending the American Society of Clinical Oncology this week in Chicago. “If, for example, you are seeing a patient that for you and your practice is an unusual presentation or in an unusual setting, you will have the ability to query the database and rapidly see 50 or 100 similar cases to gain insight about what has been done by others and what happened when certain techniques or treatments were employed,” Dr. Lichter said.

Physicians attending the ASCO meeting will have the opportunity to view a demonstration of the database which now contains real world data.

Learn more about this big data initiative at: http://cancerlinq.org/

Story reprinted from ASCO Daily News 6.5.16:  http://am.asco.org/cancerlinq-gaining-participants-enthusiasm, author: Kathy Holliman, MEd

NN/LM SCR Introduces Our Research Administrator: Bethany Livingston

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

bethany-livingston

The NN/LM SCR would like to welcome our newest addition to the RML team. Bethany Livingston, BS, will serve as the Research Administrator for the South Central Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Bethany comes to UNTHSC from the University of Florida’s College of Medicine and Institute for Child Health Policy.  She has extensive expertise in coordinating clinical, basic, and applied research trials.  She has managed multi-million dollar budgets for federally funded research projects and has experience coordinating a large staff and multiple project aims.  She has been a core member of grant teams, coordinating project management activities across prime and sub award institutions, including budget, survey administration, and process evaluation.

Bethany will serve an invaluable role as we develop and offer funding mechanisms throughout the region!

Contact Bethany at Bethany.Livingston@unthsc.edu or 817-735-2370.

 

 

 

NN/LM SCR Introduces Our Consumer Health Outreach Coordinator: Myriam Martinez-Banuelos

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Myriam Martinez-Banuelos

Myriam Martinez-Banuelos, NN/LM SCR Consumer Health Outreach Coordinator, has been instrumental in helping establish the new office in Fort Worth.  Prior to transferring to the RML, she served as the Outreach Librarian for the UNT Health Science Center and has been developing outreach programming and services within the designated Lewis Library 24 county outreach region.

In this role, Myriam coordinated Lewis Library’s NN/LM Resource Library Outreach subcontract award and was able to develop new partnerships that allowed Lewis Library to extend its programming to reach Hispanic communities. Some examples of successful partnerships are: Fort Worth Public Library, Haltom City Public Library, Hispanic Wellness Coalition, and Northside Inter-Community Agency.

Myriam was able to establish a new partnership with Dia de la Mujer Latina, a community based organization that primarily serves Hispanics, for the first time to reach community health workers and provided training sessions in Spanish for this audience. She also has developed programs focused on health topics for children and their parents at the Fort Worth Library.

Myriam has provided instruction services to consumers, English learners, community health workers, nurses, English as a second language instructors, public librarians, public library staff members, academic librarians, seniors, teenage parents, and high school students.

Myriam has also been teaching adult education classes since 2012. She was a volunteer ESL instructor at the Fort Worth Public Library for almost two years where she started exploring strategies to integrate health literacy into ESL instruction. She was also a volunteer instructor and assisted in developing an ESL program for Facilities Management Employees at the University of North Texas Health Science Center.

Her outreach efforts have also been extended to international audiences. Myriam has provided online instructional sessions for library students in Costa Rica and medical librarians in Colombia. She recently coordinated a professional exchange program funded by NN/LM SCR where Lewis Library was able to host a medical librarian from Mexico during the MLA/SCC Annual Meeting.

Myriam is a past recipient of the NN/LM SCR Library Student Outreach Award and was selected for the 2016 Emerging Leader Class by the American Library Association. Myriam received her Consumer Health Information Specialization, Level II, from the Medical Library Association in 2015.

Contact Myriam at Myriam.Martinez-Banuelos@unthsc.edu or 817-735-2469.

Reproducible Research: Many Dimensions and Shared Responsibilities

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

Reposted from:  NNLMALL Listserv

Attend Worshop and Videocast on Reproducible Research from NIH on Monday March 14, 2016.

NIH Data Science Workforce Development Center

TITLE: Reproducible Research: Many Dimensions and Shared Responsibilities
DATE: Monday, March 14, 20162:30pm to 4:30pm EST; 1:30pm to 3:30pm CST; 12:30pm-2:30pm MT
LOCATION: NIH Main Campus, Building 10, Lipsett Auditorium
VIDEOCAST: This workshop will be videocast.

INSTRUCTOR:
Lisa Meier McShane
Chief, Biostatistics Branch
Biometric Research Program
Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis
National Cancer Institute

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION:
Biomedical researchers have an ethical responsibility to ensure the reproducibility and integrity of their work so that precious research resources are not wasted, and most importantly, flawed or misleading results do not make their way to clinical studies where the faulty evidence could adversely affect study participants.  Many factors have been suggested as contributors to irreproducible biomedical research, including poor study design, analytic instability of measurement methods, sloppy data handling, inappropriate and misleading statistical analysis methods, improper reporting or interpretation of results, and on rare occasions, outright scientific misconduct.  These problems can occur in any type of biomedical study, whether preclinical or clinical, large or small.  Examples of the many potential pitfalls will be discussed along with suggested approaches to avoid them.  The first half of the seminar will focus mainly on issues that arise commonly in preclinical and sma!
ll clinical studies or studies performed retrospectively using stored biospecimens.  The second half will elaborate on aspects that are particularly problematic in research involving use of novel measurement technologies such as “omics assays” which generate large volumes of data and require specialized expertise and computational approaches for proper data analysis and interpretation.  The discussions will emphasize the importance of including in a research team all individuals with the needed expertise as early as possible in a project in order to promote a sense of engagement and facilitate good communication across disciplines.   Shared credit for scientific accomplishments should be understood as an acceptance of shared accountability for the integrity of the work.

ADDITIONAL EVENT DETAILS:  This lecture is part of a full day of scheduled events and activities for the second annual NIH Pi Day, which celebrates the intersection between the quantitative and biomedical sciences. Pi Day is an annual international celebration of the irrational number Pi, 3.14…, on March 14. On Pi Day and every day, NIH recognizes the importance of building a diverse biomedical workforce with the quantitative skills required to tackle future challenges. For more information, visit the event page at https://datascience.nih.gov/PiDay2016.

Healthy Eye Care Habits Equates to Healthy Eyes For People Who Wear Contact Lens

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

Adapted from:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s article “Healthy Contact Lens Wear”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) more than 40 million people in the U.S. wear contact lenses. While contact lenses are generally a safe and effective form of vision correction, they are not entirely risk-free-especially if they are not cared for properly. The key to reap the benefits of wearing contact lenses, it is necessary to practice healthy eye care habits. Enjoy the comfort and benefits of contact lenses while lowering your chance of complications. Failure to wear, clean, and store your lenses as directed by your eye doctor raises the risk of developing serious infections and other complications. Your habits, supplies, and eye doctor are all essential to keeping your eyes healthy. Follow the following tips:

See CDC infographic http://www.cdc.gov/contactlenses/pdf/contact-lens-infographic-508.pdf

Healthy Habits For Contact Lens Wearers 

  • Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well with a clean cloth before touching your contact lenses every time.
  • Don’t sleep in your contact lenses unless prescribed to do so by your eye doctor.
  • Keep water away from your contact lenses. Avoid showering in contact lenses, and remove them before using a hot tub or swimming
  • Rub and rinse your contact lenses with contact lens disinfecting solution—never water or saliva—to clean them each time you remove them.
  • Never store your contact lenses in water.
  • Replace your contact lenses as often as prescribed by your eye doctor.
  • Rub and rinse your contact lens case with contact lens solution—never water—and then empty and  dry with a clean tissue. Store upside down with the caps off after each use.
  • Replace your contact lens case at least once every three months.
  • Don’t “top off” solution. Use only fresh contact lens solution in your case—never mix fresh solution with old or used solution.
  • Use only the contact lens solution recommended by your eye doctor your Eye Doctor
  • Carry a backup pair of glasses with a current prescription—just in case you have to take out your contact lenses.

    Check out CDC’s health promotion materials, including posters, podcasts, a social media library, and more!

    What the CDC is Doing

    CDC is working with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), eye care providers, contact lens and product manufacturers, and academic partners on a collaborative effort to improve how people wear and care for their contact lenses.

    Learn more about these partnerships.

    Visit your eye doctor yearly or as often as he or she recommends.Ask your eye doctor if you have questions about how to care for your contact lenses and case or if you are having any difficulties.Remove your contact lenses immediately and call your eye doctor if you have eye pain, discomfort, redness, or blurred vision.

National Library of Medicine Announces MedPix®, Free Online Medical Image Database

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

Adapted from:  National Library of Medicine’s News and Events dated 2/05/16

The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. The URL is https://medpix.nlm.nih.gov/.

The foundation for MedPix was a radiology study tool that was originally developed by Dr. J.G. Smirniotopoulos in 1984. In the early 1990s, as radiology was moving from film to digital imaging, there was simultaneously a merger of the diagnostic imaging residency programs of the two premier military hospitals: Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center. In the summer of 1999, a Web-based digital teaching file based on the radiology study tool was built at USUHS to allow the two military training programs to share teaching file cases, a training requirement. Soon, other military hospitals and several civilian institutions joined MedPix. Over the past 16 years, MedPix has amassed an impressive collection of over 53,000 images from over 13,000 cases.

The MedPix collection categorizes and classifies the image and patient data for each of several subsets of image database applications (e.g. radiology, pathology, ophthalmology, etc.). The content material is both high-quality and high-yield and includes both common and rare conditions. Most cases have a proven diagnosis (pathology, clinical follow-up). The teaching file cases are peer-reviewed by an Editorial Panel.

As a public education service, the NLM and MedPix provide the storage service, indexing, and Web server hosting. Individuals as well as institutions may participate. Contributed content may be copyrighted by the original author/contributor. No additional software required—your Internet browser is all you need!

The primary target audience includes resident and practicing physicians, medical students, nurses and graduate nursing students and other post-graduate trainees. The material is organized by disease category, disease location (organ system), and by patient profiles.

At this time, the new MedPix website is up. Existing users can login, but there is no access to CME credits yet, no new registration, no submitting a case and no search.

NOTE: MedPix provides a quick summary of medical information with images. It is not intended to be encyclopedic.

WARNING: This is not a substitute for medical advice, and the reader is responsible for confirming the accuracy of this information before beginning or changing any therapy or treatment.

For more information see:  MedPix Home Page https://medpix.nlm.nih.gov/  – NLM’s Medical Image Database

Since its founding in 1836, the National Library of Medicine https://www.nlm.nih.gov has played a pivotal role in translating biomedical research into practice and is a leader in information innovation. NLM is the world’s largest medical library, and millions of scientists, health professionals and the public around the world use NLM services every day.

 

Million Hearts: Learn the ABCs of Heart Health to Prevent Heart Disease and Stroke

Friday, February 12th, 2016

Adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Million Hearts http://millionhearts.hhs.gov/learn-prevent/  initiative is a national public-private partnership that aims to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017 by using clinical and community prevention to improve the ABCS.

  • Every year, Americans suffer more than 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes. We’re all at risk for heart disease and stroke. People of all ages, genders, races, and ethnicities are affected. However, certain groups—including African Americans and older individuals are at higher risk than others.
  • Each day, approximately 2,200 people die from cardiovascular disease—that’s more than 800,000 Americans each year, or 1 in every 3 deaths.
  • Together, heart disease and stroke account for more than $316.6 billion in health care costs and lost productivity annually—and these costs are rising. On a personal level, families who experience heart disease or stroke not only have to deal with medical bills but also lost wages and the potential of a decreased standard of living.
  • Nearly half of all African American adults have some form of cardiovascular disease that includes heart disease and stroke.
  • High blood pressure is the leading cause of heart attack and stroke in the United States. About 2 out of every 5 African American adults have high blood pressure, and less than half of them have it under control. African American adults are much more likely to suffer from high blood pressure (hypertension), and heart attack and stroke deaths than white adults. Individuals living below the federal poverty level are more likely to have high blood pressure compared with those living at the highest level of income.

You can lower your chance of heart disease and stroke by taking simple steps.

  • Eat a healthy diet with fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products. Choose foods low in saturated fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars.
  • Exercise regularly. Adults needs 2 hours and 30 minutes (or 150 minutes total) of exercise each week. You can spread your activity out during the week, and can break it up into smaller chunks of time during the day.
  • Do not smoke. 
  • Limit alcohol use, which can lead to long-term health problems, including heart disease and cancer. If you do choose to drink, do so in moderation, which is no more than one drink a day for women and two for men.
  • Know your family history. There may be factors that could increase your risk for heart disease and stroke.
  • Manage any medical condition you might have. Know the ABCS of heart health. Keep them in mind every day and especially when you talk to your physician:
    • Appropriate aspirin therapy for those who need it
    • Blood pressure control
    • Cholesterol management
    • Smoking cessation

For more information:  See the CDC Division for Heart and Stroke Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/DHDSP/.

FDA Collaborates With NLM and NIH to Increase Diversity in Clinical Trials

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016

Adapted from: FDA blog, January 27, 2016

The importance of diversity in clinical trials cannot be underscored. Controlled clinical trials form the basis of evidence for evaluating whether a medical product is effective prior to the product being approved and marketed. One challenge for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is ensuring that research participants are representative of the patients who will use the medical product. A variety of people should have the opportunity to participate in trials, be knowledgeable about upcoming trials, have access to new therapies and have the chance to contribute to the betterment of medical treatment for everyone. Historically, the elderly, women and racial/ethnic minorities have been underrepresented in trials. Literature has well-documented this under-representation in recent years, particularly for women in some cardiovascular trials and general inclusion of black/African-American and minority participants in clinical trials. In response to these concerns, Congress included FDASIA Section 907: Inclusion of Demographic Subgroups in Clinical Trials in the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012 , http://www.fda.gov/RegulatoryInformation/Legislation/SignificantAmendmentstotheFDCAct/FDASIA/ucm389100.htm giving FDA direction to evaluate this issue and take action. FDA has responded in multiple ways, including the creation of Drug Trials Snapshots more than a year ago that provides the public with a demographic profile of people participating in clinical trials for approved drugs. FDA notes that an evaluation of the Snapshots program shows that some groups, especially ethnic and racial groups, aren’t always well represented in clinical trials.

Increasing diversity in clinical trials is a priority for FDA. To that end, in 2016, the agency is planning a variety of activities and collaborations to push for greater inclusion, including more minority participation. For example:

  • FDA’s Office of Minority Health has developed a variety of tools to support clinical trial participation, including collaboration with the National Library of Medicine to help consumers and patients find clinical trials, educational materials on trials, as well as a multi-media campaign highlighting the importance of clinical trial participation. These materials are designed to urge those underrepresented in clinical trials to find out more information, and consider enrolling.
  • FDA’s Office of Women’s Health launched its Diverse Women in Clinical Trials initiative. Developed in collaboration with the National Institute of Health’s Office of Research on Women’s Health, this multipronged effort will raise awareness and share best practices about clinical research design, recruitment, and subpopulation analyses.
  • FDA’s biostatisticians, trial design experts, and quantitative scientists will continue to work with the research community to develop methods to refine our approach to the conduct and analysis of trials to provide the best estimates of treatment effects for diverse populations.
  • FDA will continue our commitment to include patient advocacy groups to engage patients in clinical trial design, feedback and evaluation from a patient’s perspective. By engaging patients early in the trial design process, feasibility and participation may be improved.
  • The FDA’s Office of External Affairs plans to publish a consumer update describing what it is like to participate in a clinical trial and encouraging the public to enroll in trials.
  • The FDA has declared 2016 the year of more diversity in clinical trials. For more information see: http://blogs.fda.gov/fdavoice/index.php/2016/01/

NIH News In Health February 2016

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Adapted from: NIH News in Health, February 2016 issue

Check out the February issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark http://health.nih.gov.

 

Technologies Enhance Tumor Surgery Helping Surgeons Spot and Remove Cancer NIH-funded researchers are developing new technologies to help surgeons figure out exactly where cancerous tumors end and healthy tissue begins. Read more about technologies for cancer surgery.
 
Focusing on Fibromyalgia A Puzzling and Painful Condition Fibromyalgia is a long-term condition marked by pain and fatigue. It can be hard to diagnose, but treatment can help. Read more about fibromyalgia.

Health Capsules:

Infertility Treatments and Children’s Development

Help for Rare and Undiagnosed Conditions

Featured Website: NIH Office of Dietary Supplements 

Please NIH’s website http://www.nih.gov/ for current authoritative health information.