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Archive for the ‘Diversity’ Category

Fundamentals of the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care Webinar

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016

Adapted from: NLM Outreach and Special Populations Branch

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health is offering the first webinar in a series on the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care on March 17, 2016 at 2 pm CT. The featured speaker will be: Dr. J. Nadine Garcia, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health, Director, Office of Minority of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Culturally and linguistically appropriate services refers to facilities that are respectful of and responsive to individual cultural health beliefs, practices, preferred languages, health literacy levels and communication needs.

The National CLAS Standards provide a blueprint for individuals and health care organizations to serve the nation’s diverse communities through culturally and linguistically appropriate services.  Furthermore, those in attendance will learn about culturally and linguistically appropriate services and the National CLAS Standards.

Attendees are encouraged to register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1124444526228357633

After registering, you will receive a conformation email containing information about joining the webinar.

What is FDA Doing to Improve the Health of African-Americans?

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

Adapted from  posted  on  

By: Jovonni Spinner, M.P.H., C.H.E.S. Public Health Advisor in FDA’s Office of Minority Health

Every February, Black History Month is celebrated as a time to reflect, celebrate, and honor the contributions of African-Americans to our society. Achieving and maintaining good health is a long-standing issue for this group, many of whom may experience worse health outcomes in critical areas like heart disease and diabetes. By focusing on the positive and providing consumers with health education materials to support healthy behavior changes the Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Minority Health www.fda.gov/minorityhealth have made progress in eradicating the health equity gap, and the gap has narrowed over time, but there is still significant room for improvement. Here are few things that the Food and Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov/ (FDA) and the Office of Minority Health www.fda.gov/minorityhealth (OMH) have done over the past year to reduce health disparities. More than 29.2 million blacks/African-Americans are on social media — and we want to meet consumers where they are. FDA and OMH are using Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms and electronic communications (e.g. our newsletter and e-blasts) to educate African- Americans on issues such as heart disease, diabetes, and sickle cell disease among others, and also provide tangible solutions to help manage these chronic conditions. For example, to mark American Heart Month in February, we developed a social media toolkit to help our stakeholders engage with their members and partnered with the Association of Black Cardiologists to spearhead an http://www.abcardio.org/articles/lovemyheart.html #ILoveMyHeart social media campaign. The FDA and OMH  have cultivated relationships with a core set of partners to better understand their health needs, aligned our priorities to meet those needs, and worked together to leverage each other’s resources for the common good. By doing so, the FDA and OMH have increased the stakeholder’s capacity to communicate with the agency on regulatory issues. For example, multicultural stakeholders are now better able to make their voice heard in FDA-sponsored public meetings and on open dockets.  In regards, to Minority Health Research  FDA and OMH has worked with academia to fund African-American-based research projects (e.g. HIV/AIDs and triple negative breast cancer) and research fellows working on topics like genomics and digital communications. This allows us to increase the knowledge base on these issues and ensure a diverse workforce is in place to solve these complex health problems. FDA and OMH’s Minority Health education Resources , offer infographics and fact sheets, tailored to African Americans. The FDA website has valuable information on sickle cell disease and lupus, both of which affect African Americans more than any other racial/ethnic group. FDA and OMH are working to continue to work toward increasing clinical trial diversity, to ensure that medical products are safe and effective for everyone!

President Obama has said, “If you’re walking down the right path and you’re willing to keep walking, eventually you’ll make progress.” OMH will continue walking down the path to improving health equity and we want you to join us, because this work cannot be done alone.

Visit FDA’s OMH at: www.fda.gov/minorityhealth

Follow us on Twitter @FDAOMH

Jovonni Spinner

A Year of Health Calendar – Free Download/Order

Saturday, December 19th, 2015

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the NIH, has developed a set of 2016 health planners – A Year of Health – tailored for four multicultural communities as part of its National Multicultural Outreach Initiative. The Hispanic/Latino Health Planner is also bilingual! An organization can order up to 150 copies of the health planner free of charge for their communities, while supplies last.

NIAMS is prAsian amerian health planneroviding also some great images you can use in their social media toolkit for promotional purposes and have offered the following tweets:

  • Each day is a chance to get healthier. Order your free 2016 health planners from @NIH_NIAMS today! http://1.usa.gov/1FU4Hh2 #NMOI2016
  • Have you thought about your #health goals for 2016? @NIH_NIAMS can help with free 2016 health planners http://1.usa.gov/1FU4Hh2 #NMOI2016

The 2016 A Year of Health planners offer information on staying healthy and managing conditions of the bones, joints, muscles, skin, and pain based on proven studies. The planners also include information about other free publications that you can order or download if you want to find out more.

Environmental Health Concerns of Native Tribal Communities Webinar

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

Adapted from atsdr.cdc.gov

The American Public Health Association and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are hosting a webinar on environmental health concerns of Native Tribal communities and how ATSDR effectively supports tribal governments in addressing these concerns Thursday, December 17, 11:30-12:30pm MT, 12:30-1:30pm CT.

This is the fifth and final webinar of a five part series exploring the Agency’s role as an integral partner in: determining chemical threats; supporting communities with their environmental health concerns; protecting children and vulnerable populations; and supporting the specific needs of Native Tribes.

For more information and to register visit: https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/s/registrations/new?cid=xrv3iunvldn5

National Native American Heritage Month

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

The following is a message from National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Francis Collins:

National Native American Heritage Month (NNAHM) is a time to recognize the accomplishments of this country’s first inhabitants.  As the early inhabitants of this great land, the native peoples of North America have their own tribal orientations, language origins, and cultural histories.  Today, many healing techniques that are practiced have been adopted from traditions that originate from various Native American tribes.  This year’s NNAHM theme, “Tribal Diversity: Weaving Together Our Traditions,” highlights spirituality as an inseparable element of healing in medicine.  Healing the physical parts of a patient is not enough; one must acknowledge the importance of emotional wellness, as influenced by Native American rituals and traditions.

This month is dedicated to building new avenues of opportunity for Native Americans by making critical investments to improve health, to strengthen tribal communities, and to promote educational opportunities at the NIH.  Maintaining an inclusive biomedical research workforce with a diversity of talent is critical to the NIH mission of fostering new discoveries and promoting the highest level of scientific integrity to improve our nation’s health.  NNAHM allows the opportunity for every individual to learn more about the distinctive backgrounds and heritages of Native Americans.

I encourage everyone in the NIH community to show their support during National Native American Heritage Month by actively engaging with the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion’s (EDI’s) social media campaign.  To continue our inclusion efforts, on November 2, we will launch a month-long Twitter campaign (https://twitter.com/NIH_EDI). More information is located on the Strategist for the Native American Portfolio website (http://edi.nih.gov/people/sep/na/about) Together, let’s celebrate the many achievements made by Native Americans.

Sincerely yours,

Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D.

Save the Date: 2016 National Diversity in Libraries Conference, August 10-13 at UCLA!

Friday, October 16th, 2015

The UCLA Library and the Association of Research Libraries are co-sponsoring the 2016 National Diversity in Libraries Conference (NDLC ’16) August 10-13, 2016, to be held on the UCLA campus. This 3.5-day national forum on the topic of diversity in the library and information science profession and related sectors will feature a full day event of pre-conference activities on August 10 focusing on issues of accessibility and universal design, keynote speakers, a variety of breakout sessions, exhibits, and posters, all highlighting the conference theme Bridges to Inclusion.

The call for proposals is now available on the NDLC ’16 web site, http://ndlc.info/. The proposal form will be available on October 23, with a submission deadline of November 30. More conference information will be added as it becomes available. Registration is expected to open around February 1, 2016. Rates will be very reasonable. Reasonably priced on-campus accommodations near the meeting site will also be available.