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Archive for the ‘Consumer Health’ Category

Resources for Flu 2016

Tuesday, October 25th, 2016

“Flu vs Cold” from CDC.

Flu vs. Cold ChartWith flu season really starting to kick in, we wanted to share some resources on the disease to help you get through fall and winter!

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that every person aged six months and older get an annual flu vaccine by the end of October. Something important to note is that only injectable flu vaccines are recommended this year. Previously, the flu vaccine was also available through a nasal spray known as FluMist.

To further protect yourself, the CDC recommends staying away from people who are sick—people who are sick with the flu should stay home from work or school to prevent spreading the disease. Additionally, the CDC recommends consistent hand washing to get rid of germs.

Flu 2016 symptoms include:

  • fever or feeling feverish/chills
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • runny or stuffy nose
  • muscle or body aches
  • headaches
  • fatigue
  • vomiting or diarrhea in some cases

The CDC also has a chart that shows the difference between cold and flu symptoms.

If you suspect you have the flu, you should visit your doctor for a diagnosis and to be prescribed antiviral prescription drugs. This treatment works best when started within 48 hours of getting sick, so you should see a doctor right away if you experience symptoms.

To read more about the 2016 flu, please visit the CDC’s flu page.

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Extra Fat in Different Areas of the Body Associated with Higher Risk of Heart Disease

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

“Photo” by PublicDomainPictures is licensed under CC0.

Woman Measuring WaistMost of us may have some “problem areas” on our bodies that we want to fix. But new research shows that carrying extra weight on certain parts of your body may be more dangerous to your health than others.

A recent study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found that carrying extra belly fat, particularly in the gut area, often referred to as a “spare tire,” causes a person to have a higher risk of heart disease, especially when compared to the heart disease risk for a person’s fat elsewhere, like in the hips, often called “love handles.”

Reasons for this higher risk are not entirely known yet, but Dr. Greg Fonarow, cardiology professor at University of California, Los Angeles explained to MedlinePlus that belly fat is known to be associated with abnormalities like high triglyceride levels, low levels of HDL (good cholesterol), high blood pressure and risk of diabetes.

It’s important to stress, however, that there is no definitive proof that belly fat causes heart disease, only that there is a higher risk associated with it.

To read more about fat and heart disease, visit “‘Spare Tires’ May Be Tougher on Your Heart Than ‘Love Handles.’”

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The Digital Shift of Libraries

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

“Photo” by Fabian Irsara is licensed under CC0.

Laptop KeyboardNational Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region – the name is a bit of a mouthful, and what is it exactly? The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) is a network of libraries, information providers, public health agencies, community organizations and more, focused on improving public health by providing U.S. health officials and the U.S. public with equal access to health information.

Specific to the NN/LM SCR, our objectives are to assess, educate, increase access, and advocate. In order to carry out these objectives, NN/LM SCR has been striving to shy away from the traditional thought that a library is a brick and mortar facility and instead is something that can be accessed digitally, anywhere and anytime.

The Library Journal recently published an article about how the library world is shifting – most libraries are trying to add a digital arm if they don’t have one already. In the article, Rachel Fewell, central library administrator at the Denver Public Library, described two groups of people: those who use the library, and those who don’t even think about the library.

“Making libraries more visible on the web has two benefits,” reports the Library Journal. “Improving the service for the ones who are already committed to the library—they use search engines, too—and giving libraries the opportunity to reach those who never—or only sometimes—think about the library.”

Putting library materials online surely won’t hurt any library. If anything, it will make it more successful. It gives people who do use libraries the choice on how they prefer to use it, and it gives those people who wouldn’t physically visit a library the ability to use it from anywhere. Additionally, creating digital libraries is extremely beneficial to those who live in rural communities and may not have immediate access to a physical library.

Digital libraries are especially smart when it comes to increasing access to health information. While the public may not physically visit a library to gain knowledge on health issues affecting them, they are definitely searching the web and reading the news. The NLM has created extensive online databases and repositories available for consumers, clinicians and scientists.

To read more about the digital shift of libraries, please visit: “Making Libraries Visible on the Web.”

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Brain Responds Differently to Food Cues in Severely Obese Women

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

Photo by Henrique Félix licensed under CC0.

Woman Eating SoupA recent study by the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center has shown that severely obese women who have just eaten will continue to respond to food cues even though they are no longer hungry. On the contrary, leaner women who have just eaten will not receive these cues from their brain.

The study compared 15 severely obese women to 15 lean women. Researchers took MRI images of the participants’ brains before and after eating. When any person is hungry, their brain will react in a certain way when shown images of food. The study found that once full, the lean woman’s brain no longer reacted to those images—the MRI scans showed the appeal of the food images dropped 15 percent. Obese women’s brains, however, were still excited when viewing those images—the appeal dropped only 4 percent.

“These findings may explain why some people with severe obesity report an underlying drive to eat continually despite not feeling hungry,” said Dr. Puzziferri, who specializes in bariatric and weight loss surgery, in a news release. “In contrast, lean women when full will either stop eating or just sample a food they crave. It’s just not a level playing field – it’s harder for some people to maintain a healthy weight than others.”

To learn more about the study, please visit “Brain activity and response to food cues differ in severely obese women.”

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ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Funds Study Linking Gene to the Disease

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

“AFGE President J. David Cox Sr. Takes ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” by AFGE
is licensed under CC BY 2.0

ALS Ice Bucket ChallengeDo you remember seeing videos of people dumping a bucket of water on their head last year or the year before? Chances are if you were on Facebook, you saw at least one. For those who don’t remember or were unaware, those videos were a part of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, which went viral on social media. Users tagged each other to take the challenge within 24 hours or donate to the ALS Association.

The challenge raised awareness and money for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS (also commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease). But why dump a bucket of ice water on yourself? One of the common symptoms of ALS is muscle weakness, which can also lead to a feeling of numbness in a patient’s limbs. By pouring a bucket of ice water over yourself, you are meant to be simulating the numbness that many ALS patients feel.

During the challenge’s popularity peak, it was often criticized that while it raised awareness for the disease, it was unclear if the challenge was doing much good raising money: “The challenge even seems to be suggesting that being cold, wet, and uncomfortable is preferable to fighting ALS,” wrote Time Magazine news editor Jacob Davidson.

While the amount of donations might have been unclear at the time, the ALS Association announced last week that money raised during the challenge funded the study that found the NEK1 gene is linked to the deadly disease. The study looked at the histories of more than 1,000 families and involved more than 80 researchers in 11 countries, ultimately determining a connection between the gene and the disease.

For more information about ALS, the Ice Bucket Challenge or the new discovery, please visit the ALS Association or “’Ice Bucket Challenge’ Funds a Boon to ALS Research.”

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August is Child Eye Health & Safety Month

Monday, August 1st, 2016

“students-in-class-with-teacher-reading” by Ilmicrofono Oggiono
is licensed under CC BY 2.0
Students in Class with Teacher

Did you know August is Child Eye Health & Safety Month? Coming just in time for back-to-school season, this is the perfect time to schedule an appointment to ensure your child’s vision is in excellent shape. 

Annual vision checks are especially important for children because if vision problems are caught early, there is a much higher chance that the problem can be corrected. The eye is just like any other body part; a child learns how to see, just like a child learns how to walk or talk. If a vision problem goes undiagnosed, then the brain learns to accommodate the problem and eventually there might not be any way to correct it; instead, doctors may only be able treat the problem with glasses or contact lenses.

While eye health is important, don’t forget about eye safety. Friends for Sight estimates that out of the thousands of children who sustain eye injuries every year, 90% of them are preventable. Children and parents just need to be aware of and use protective eyewear when it is necessary.

To learn more, please visit the American Optometric Association or “Child Eye Health and Safety Month – August.”

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Lifestyle Choices and Gender May Affect a Person’s Resilience to Alzheimer’s Genes

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

“Alzheimers” by Michael Havens is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Alzheimer'sWe all know we should take care of our bodies. Health professionals tell us to eat healthy and to exercise in order to maintain our physical health; and we know we should challenge our minds to maintain our mental health. Leading a healthy life can lower your risk for many illnesses and diseases including heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers. And now, a new study suggests that even if you carry Alzheimer’s genes, if you lead a healthy lifestyle you might be less likely to feel the effects of the disease.

Findings indicate that if you’re a woman you might also have a stronger resilience to the disease even if the genes are present in your DNA. The study found that only 32 percent of women showed signs of memory decline while 47 percent of men did. Research suggested that women can further help maintain their memory by having an active social life, healthy lungs, and moderate exercise.

It’s important to also note that even if you carry Alzheimer’s genes, that is not a guarantee that you will get the disease.

To learn more, please visit “Women May Be More Resilient to Effects of Alzheimer’s Genes,” or

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Speaking to Diverse Communities Through HealthReach

Monday, June 13th, 2016

HealthReach LogoThe National Library of Medicine continues to provide access to health information to underserved communities through HealthReach. HealthReach is a national partnership that offers access to patient education materials in multiple languages, as well as helpful information for providers who offer services to individuals for whom English is not their native language. On the patient materials tab, users are able to search by topic, language, format, and authors. Providers are able to search by countries, populations, and authors. Materials for both audiences include audio, videos, and documents.

Resources include:

  • Health education materials in various languages and formats (brochures, fact sheets, videos)
  • Provider tools (including best practices, cultural information, and effective use of interpreters)
  • Special collections on Emergency and Disaster, Women’s Health, and Mental Health

HealthReach provides free access to high quality, culturally relevant health information. Visit for more information.

A portion of this entry was adapted from

Adults Do Not Get Enough Sleep: A Good Night’s Sleep Is Critical For Good Health

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

Adapted from: Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Newsroom

More than a third of American adults are not getting enough sleep on a regular basis, according to a new study in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. This is the first study to document estimates of self-reported healthy sleep duration (7 or more hours per day) for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society recommend that adults aged 18–60 years sleep at least 7 hours each night to promote optimal health and well-being. Sleeping less than seven hours per day is associated with an increased risk of developing chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and frequent mental distress. “As a nation we are not getting enough sleep,” said Wayne Giles, M.D., director of CDC’s Division of Population Health. “Lifestyle changes such as going to bed at the same time each night; rising at the same time each morning; and turning off or removing televisions, computers, mobile devices from the bedroom, can help people get the healthy sleep they need.” Prevalence of healthy sleep duration varies by geography, race/ethnicity, employment, marital status CDC researchers reviewed data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a state-based, random-digit–dialed telephone survey conducted collaboratively by state health departments and CDC.

Key Findings:

  • Healthy sleep duration was lower among Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (54 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (54 percent), multiracial non-Hispanics (54 percent) and American Indians/Alaska Natives (60 percent) compared with non-Hispanic whites (67 percent), Hispanics (66 percent), and Asians (63 percent).
  • The prevalence of healthy sleep duration varied among states and ranged from 56 percent in Hawaii to 72 percent in South Dakota.
  • A lower proportion of adults reported getting at least seven hours of sleep per day in states clustered in the southeastern region of the United States and the Appalachian Mountains. Previous studies have shown that these regions also have the highest prevalence of obesity and other chronic conditions.
  • People who reported they were unable to work or were unemployed had lower healthy sleep duration (51 percent and 60 percent, respectively) than did employed respondents (65 percent). The prevalence of healthy sleep duration was highest among people with a college degree or higher (72 percent).
  • The percentage reporting a healthy sleep duration was higher among people who were married (67 percent) compared with those who were never married (62 percent) or divorced, widowed, or separated (56 percent).

Healthy Sleep Tips:

  • Healthcare providers should routinely assess patients’ sleep patterns and discuss sleep-related problems such as snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness.
  • Healthcare providers should also educate patients about the importance of sleep to their health.
  • Individuals should make getting enough sleep a priority and practice good sleep habits.
  • Employers can consider adjusting work schedules to allow their workers time to get enough sleep.
  • Employers can also educate their shift workers about how to improve their sleep.

For more information on CDC’s Sleep and Sleep Disorders Program, please visit

National Library of Medicine Announces MedPix®, Free Online Medical Image Database

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

Adapted from:  National Library of Medicine’s News and Events dated 2/05/16

The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. The URL is

The foundation for MedPix was a radiology study tool that was originally developed by Dr. J.G. Smirniotopoulos in 1984. In the early 1990s, as radiology was moving from film to digital imaging, there was simultaneously a merger of the diagnostic imaging residency programs of the two premier military hospitals: Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center. In the summer of 1999, a Web-based digital teaching file based on the radiology study tool was built at USUHS to allow the two military training programs to share teaching file cases, a training requirement. Soon, other military hospitals and several civilian institutions joined MedPix. Over the past 16 years, MedPix has amassed an impressive collection of over 53,000 images from over 13,000 cases.

The MedPix collection categorizes and classifies the image and patient data for each of several subsets of image database applications (e.g. radiology, pathology, ophthalmology, etc.). The content material is both high-quality and high-yield and includes both common and rare conditions. Most cases have a proven diagnosis (pathology, clinical follow-up). The teaching file cases are peer-reviewed by an Editorial Panel.

As a public education service, the NLM and MedPix provide the storage service, indexing, and Web server hosting. Individuals as well as institutions may participate. Contributed content may be copyrighted by the original author/contributor. No additional software required—your Internet browser is all you need!

The primary target audience includes resident and practicing physicians, medical students, nurses and graduate nursing students and other post-graduate trainees. The material is organized by disease category, disease location (organ system), and by patient profiles.

At this time, the new MedPix website is up. Existing users can login, but there is no access to CME credits yet, no new registration, no submitting a case and no search.

NOTE: MedPix provides a quick summary of medical information with images. It is not intended to be encyclopedic.

WARNING: This is not a substitute for medical advice, and the reader is responsible for confirming the accuracy of this information before beginning or changing any therapy or treatment.

For more information see:  MedPix Home Page  – NLM’s Medical Image Database

Since its founding in 1836, the National Library of Medicine has played a pivotal role in translating biomedical research into practice and is a leader in information innovation. NLM is the world’s largest medical library, and millions of scientists, health professionals and the public around the world use NLM services every day.