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Archive for 2015

National Network of Libraries of Medicine Accomplishments in 2015

Thursday, December 31st, 2015

We recently received an email from Dianne Babski, acting head of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) National Network Office, which listed some of the network’s accomplishment in 2015. There are some impressive numbers that could not have been achieved without the partnership of our valuable resource libraries in our network.

A few accomplishments in 2015 include:

  • The network increased membership to over 6,400 members (approximately 1,100 of those in the South Central region)
  • The network conducted almost 1,700 outreach activities, including training, exhibiting and conducting demonstrations.
    • NN/LM Staff and network members participated in over 30,000 training opportunities.
    • Regional Medical Library and network members conducted over 650 exhibits at the state, local and national levels.

Dianne’s email also cited some events from 2015, such as: Dr. Lindberg’s retirement from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) in March, the delivery of the future of NLM report from the advisory committee to the NIH director, and behind the scenes, migrating all our NN/LM websites to the Drupal platform!

Together, all of us in the network work to bring health information to millions of people who count on support from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. This includes healthcare providers, researchers, the general public, and librarians who know they will find quality information services when we are at their service.

Thank you from the NN/LM SCR. Here’s to a great 2016!

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Finding Information about Integrative and Complementary Medicine

Saturday, December 26th, 2015

The NN/LM SCR offers a popular class entitled “Will Duct Tape Cure My Warts? Examining Complementary and Alternative Medicine” that covers the history and statistics about complementary and integrative medicine, as well as the best resources to find information about these therapies and practices.

The authoritative website is the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), from the National Institutes of Health. Formerly called the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, it underwent a name change in December 2014 in order to reflect the Center’s research commitment to studying promising health approaches already in use by the American public.

The National Library of Medicine’s premiere consumer health website, MedlinePlus, is another excellent resource on this topic. MedlinePlus has a health topics page for Complementary and Integrative Medicine with several links to the NCCIH as well as to other authoritative organizations’ websites.

For finding research articles from medical journals, the NCCIH has partnered with PubMed on an automatic “complementary and alternative medicine” search filter, called “CAM on PubMed®.” When you type your search topic into this filter, PubMed will automatically retrieve scientific research articles in the area of complementary and integrative medicines.

So enjoy learning about acupuncture, magnets, zinc and everything in between! Keep an eye out for our “Will Duct Tape Cure My Warts?” class as a possible future activity, which we teach both in person and online via Moodle.

12 Ways to Have A Healthy Holiday Season

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

Group of people with snowmanTake steps to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy. Brighten the holidays by making your health and safety a priority. Take steps to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy—and ready to enjoy the holidays.

  1. Wash hands often to help prevent the spread of germs. It’s flu season. Wash your hands with soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds.
  2. Manage stress. Give yourself a break if you feel stressed out, overwhelmed, and out of control. Some of the best ways to manage stress are to find support, connect socially, and get plenty of sleep.
  3. Don’t drink and drive or let others drink and drive. Whenever anyone drives drunk, they put everyone on the road in danger. Choose not to drink and drive and help others do the same.
  4. Bundle up to stay dry and warm. Wear appropriate outdoor clothing: light, warm layers, gloves, hats, scarves, and waterproof boots.
  5. Be smoke-free. Avoid smoking and secondhand smoke. Smokers have greater health risks because of their tobacco use, but nonsmokers also are at risk when exposed to tobacco smoke.
  6. Fasten seat belts while driving or riding in a motor vehicle. Always buckle your children in the car using a child safety seat, booster seat, or seat belt according to their height, weight, and age. Buckle up every time, no matter how short the trip and encourage passengers to do the same.
  7. Get exams and screenings. Ask your health care provider what exams you need and when to get them. Update your personal and family history. Get insurance from the Health Insurance Marketplace if you are not insured.
  8. Get your vaccinations. Vaccinations help prevent diseases and save lives. Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine each year.
  9. Monitor children. Keep potentially dangerous toys, food, drinks, household items, and other objects out of children’s reach. Protect them from drowning, burns, falls, and other potential accidents.
  10. Practice fire safety. Most residential fires occur during the winter months, so don’t leave fireplaces, space heaters, food cooking on stoves, or candles unattended. Have an emergency plan and practice it regularly.
  11. Prepare food safely. Remember these simple steps: Wash hands and surfaces often, avoid cross-contamination, cook foods to proper temperatures and refrigerate foods promptly.
  12. Eat healthy, stay active. Eat fruits and vegetables which pack nutrients and help lower the risk for certain diseases. Limit your portion sizes and foods high in fat, salt, and sugar. Also, be active for at least 2½ hours a week and help kids and teens be active for at least 1 hour a day.

Be inspired to stay in the spirit of good health! Listen to The 12 Ways to Health  Holiday Song or a holiday health podcast.

Adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Website (CDC) http://www.cdc.gov/features/healthytips/index.html

FDA Launches precisionFDA a Cloud-Based, Portal for Scientific Collaboration and Next-Generation Sequencing

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

Adapted from: FDA Voice Blog

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday December 15, 2015 has launched the beta version of precisionFDA, its a new collaborative platform designed to foster innovation and to develop the science behind a method of “reading” DNA also known as Next-Generation Sequencing (or NGS).  Next Generation Sequencing allows scientists to compile data on a person’s exact order or sequence of DNA. The precisionFDA includes more than 20 public and private sector participants including National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and more. Dr. Francis Collins, NIH’s Director stated on https://precision.fda.gov/ that “PrecisionFDA, is a bold and innovative step towards advancing the regulatory science for precision medicine”.

PrecisionFDA allows users to access tools such as “Genome in the Bottle“https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing-technology/nist-genome-bottle-release-first-reference-material-assessing-genome, a reference sample of DNA for validating genome sequences developed by NIST. These results can be compared with results of previously validated references, and shared with other users, who can track changes and obtain immediate feedback from precisionFDA users. In FDA Voice http://blogs.fda.gov/fdavoice/, Tasha A. Kass-Hout, MD, chief informatics officer at the FDA wrote, “His hope is to grow the community of platform participants and improve the usability of precisionFDA in the coming months and years by placing the code for the precisionFDA portal on the world’s largest open source software repository, GitHub”.

 

A Year of Health Calendar – Free Download/Order

Saturday, December 19th, 2015

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the NIH, has developed a set of 2016 health planners – A Year of Health – tailored for four multicultural communities as part of its National Multicultural Outreach Initiative. The Hispanic/Latino Health Planner is also bilingual! An organization can order up to 150 copies of the health planner free of charge for their communities, while supplies last.

NIAMS is prAsian amerian health planneroviding also some great images you can use in their social media toolkit for promotional purposes and have offered the following tweets:

  • Each day is a chance to get healthier. Order your free 2016 health planners from @NIH_NIAMS today! http://1.usa.gov/1FU4Hh2 #NMOI2016
  • Have you thought about your #health goals for 2016? @NIH_NIAMS can help with free 2016 health planners http://1.usa.gov/1FU4Hh2 #NMOI2016

The 2016 A Year of Health planners offer information on staying healthy and managing conditions of the bones, joints, muscles, skin, and pain based on proven studies. The planners also include information about other free publications that you can order or download if you want to find out more.

DOCLINE Account Passwords

Friday, December 18th, 2015

Adapted from NLM:

On January 7, 2016, NLM will implement new standards for DOCLINE account passwords. Instructions on how to meet the password requirements will be emailed to all DOCLINE libraries on January 6, 2016. Please adhere and change your password on January 7 or soon after. If your password has not changed by February 1, 2016, it will be done for you. Changes to DOCLINE will not occur until January 7, therefore all passwords created before that date will fail to meet the new system requirements.

User IDs not used to log in during 2015 will be deleted on February 1, 2016. Also, libraries without active User IDs will be set to non-participant status.

If you have any questions, please contact the NN/LM SCR office at 713-799-7880 or nnlm-scr@library.tmc.edu.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM), Launches Health Literacy Tool Shed Website

Friday, December 18th, 2015
 Adapted from NLM:
The National Library of Medicine, in partnership with Boston University School of Medicine has announced the creation of the Health Literacy Tool Shed. The online database allows users to obtain information of more than 100 health literacy research instruments and compare them to others.
 
Robert A. Logan Ph.D., senior staff, National Library of Medicine explains, “The new Health Literacy Tool Shed helps users choose the right instrument for their research or practice. It also helps researchers assess core issues, such as the impact of health literacy on health outcomes and health care utilization.”
For more information, please visit the Health Literacy Tool Shed webpage.

PubMed for Nurses: New Tutorial Available

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

The PubMed for Nurses Tutorial is available now from the PubMed Online Training page on the National Library of Medicine Web site. This tutorial was created specifically to help nurses efficiently find literature using PubMed. Its concise, targeted content consists of five videos with exercises to test your knowledge. The tutorial was designed to be completed in less than 30 minutes.

The PubMed for Nurses Tutorial was researched, designed and developed by Megan Kellner from Maryland’s iSchool, the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, in consultation with nurses and librarians who serve nurses around the United States.

nurse sitting at computer

Job Ad: Collections Manager at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Medical Library

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Research Medical Library seeks an experienced manager to lead our Collections team. The collections manager provides vision and leadership in the management of the library’s online and print resources including discovery and access. The collections manager provides direct supervision of two collections librarians and our interlibrary loan supervisor. The ideal candidate will have demonstrated abilities delivering innovative solutions.

It is an exciting time in our library as we are transitioning from our current ILS to a discovery system and back-end of supporting applications.

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, located in Houston’s Texas Medical Center, is one of the largest and most respected centers devoted to cancer patient care, research, education and prevention. MD Anderson’s mission is to eliminate cancer in Texas, the nation and the world.  As part of that mission, we provide education for undergraduate and graduate students, trainees, professionals, employees and the public.  The Research Medical Library supports the mission of MD Anderson by providing premier collections, research support, and education to the faculty, staff, and students.

Education
Required: Master’s degree in library or information sciences from an ALA-accredited program

Experience
Required: Six years of library experience in collections or resource management, including four years of supervisory experience

Preferred: Library management experience in collections or resource management acquired in a health sciences or academic library

License/Certification
Preferred: Membership in the Medical Library Association’s Academy of Health Information Professionals

Minimum Starting Salary: $67,200

You must apply online at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s https://sjobs.brassring.com/TGWebHost/jobdetails.aspx?partnerid=25765&siteid=5038&AReq=14311BR

Please include a cover letter, your resume or CV, and names of three professional references.

Review of applications begins January 18, 2016 and will continue until the position is filled.

Researchers Identify How Scientists Fabricate Their Data

Monday, December 14th, 2015

In the November 2015 Issue of the Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Jeff Hancock and David Markowitz uncovered the process in which scientists falsify their data. In the article, “Linguistic Obfuscation in Fraudulent Science“, Hancock and Markowitz identified retracted papers from 1973 to 2013 and created an obfuscation index, which based on scale, examined the level of falsified data. This includes vague language, jargon, etc.

Markowitz states, “We believe the underlying idea behind obfuscation is to muddle the truth, Scientists faking data know that they are committing a misconduct and do not want to get caught. Therefore, one strategy to evade this may be to obscure parts of the paper. We suggest that language can be one of many variables to differentiate between fraudulent and genuine science.”

The researchers are hoping for a computerized system that would help identify a potentially fraudulent paper, depending on obfuscated language but this method is not proven due to false-positive ratio. They believe that more research is need for consideration at this time. For more information, please visit: Stanford News.