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Operationalizing the CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance in Research Data Management (NNLM Research Data Management Webinar Series)

Class Details

Extractive and unethical research practices led to the accumulation of Indigenous collections in vast national repositories that have missing, incomplete, and impoverished records and metadata. These problems of inequity continue in the ways Indigenous Peoples’ data is created, stored, accessed, and used. Indigenous Peoples insist on the urgent need to integrate Indigenous knowledges and approaches into data and collections practices and policies. The articulation of Indigenous Peoples’ rights and interests in data about their peoples, communities, cultures, and territories is directed towards reclaiming control of data, data ecosystems, and data narratives in the context of open data and open science. The people and purpose-oriented CARE Principles (Collective Benefit, Authority to Control, Responsibility, and Ethics) reflect the crucial role of data in advancing innovation, governance, and self-determination among Indigenous Peoples. The CARE Principles complement and extend the more data-centric approach of the FAIR Principles (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable). This webinar will focus on the CARE Principles and identify practical tools for implementing the CARE Principles alongside the FAIR Principles in the context of the open science and open data environments.

This webinar will be of interest to those working with Indigenous data or collections, as well as metadata librarians and those interested in open access policies and managing institutional repository

Presenter: Stephanie R. Carroll, Assistant Professor and Associate Director of the Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona
Stephanie Russo Carroll (Ahtna-Native Village of Kluti Kaah) is Assistant Research Professor, Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy (UC); Associate Director and Manager – Tribal Health Program, the Native Nations Institute (NNI) in the UC; Assistant Professor in the Public Health Policy and Management Program at the Community, Environment and Policy Department, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health (MEZCOPH); Assistant Professor, American Indian Studies Graduate Interdisciplinary Program; and Co-Director, Center for Indigenous Environmental Health Research, MEZCOHP at the University of Arizona (UA).

Stephanie's research explores the links between Indigenous governance, data, the environment, and community wellness. Her interdisciplinary lab group, the Collaboratory for Indigenous Data Governance Research, develops research, policy, and practice innovations for Indigenous data sovereignty. Indigenous data sovereignty draws on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples that reaffirms the rights of Indigenous nations to control data about their peoples, lands, and resources. The lab’s research, teaching, and engagement seek to transform institutional governance and ethics for Indigenous control of Indigenous data, particularly within open science, open data, and big data contexts. The lab primarily collaborates with Indigenous Peoples and nations in the US Southwest and the Arctic, as well an international network of Indigenous data sovereignty and governance experts. Lab members also often partner with communities to which they belong, including Indigenous communities. (https://nni.arizona.edu/people/staff/stephanie-carroll-rainie)

Recording

Date: 
Thursday, September 24, 2020
11:00am - 12:00pm
Region/Office: National
Sep 24, 2020
11:00AM - 12:00PM PT
Instructor(s):
Kirsten Burcat, MLIS, Data & Evaluation Coordinator
Zoe Pettway Unno, Ph.D., MLIS, Education and Outreach Librarian
Contact:

The NNLM Research Data Management (RDM) webinar series is a collaborative, bimonthly series intended to increase awareness of RDM topics and resources.  The series aims to support RDM within the library to better serve librarians and their institutional communities. Topics include, but are not limited to, understanding a library’s role in RDM, getting started, data management planning, and different RDM tools.

Several NNLM Regional Medical Libraries will collaborate and combine efforts to feature experts from the field for this national webinar series. Each session will include separate objectives based on the featured webinar presenter. Attendee participation will be possible through the WebEx platform chat features and other electronic methods designed by the guest presenter. Sessions are recorded, closed captioned, and posted for later viewing.

Each session will last approximately 1 hour and 1 MLA CE contact hour will be offered per session. CE contact hours will only be available during the live presentations of the webinar.
 

Objectives: 
  • Explain how a tool or resource can be utilized within Research Data Management
  • Illustrate and discuss potential role(s) in which librarians or libraries can support Research Data Management
  • Facilitate the creation of RDM plans and programs