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April 2017 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of senior rubbing aching hand joints while cooking.

Check out the April issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Reducing Underage Drinking Among American Indians
    American Indian teens have higher rates of alcohol use before age 15 than other U.S. teens. They also have higher rates of alcohol problems. But ways to prevent alcohol use in these groups haven’t been studied well.
  • How Cancer Cells Spread in the Body
    During metastasis, cancer cells spread from the place in the body where they first formed to other parts of the body. Read this interesting article to learn more about how cancer spreads.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Now Available: Final Results of NNLM National Training Needs Assessment!

In December 2016 the NNLM Training Office (NTO) conducted a nationwide needs assessment to discover needs, explore preferences, and gather feedback from the user community. The questions were designed to address three broad areas: why do users take NNLM classes, how do users prefer to learn, and what are users’ training needs. Also assessed was current skill levels of users, as well as desired skill levels. Question details covered over 15 professional competencies and more than 100 NLM products. Feedback was received from 559 respondents. The full 52-page report is now available, and highlights have been published in the NTO blog. In addition, the NNLM Evaluation Office (NEO) published an accompanying blog post about how to create Dot Plots, the method used by NTO for visualizing data in the analysis.

New NIH Resource Launched: Language Access Portal!

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) has just launched the Language Access Portal (LAP). This resource provides access to reliable cross-cultural and linguistically appropriate health information from NIH and other federal agencies, for tools to help communication with populations with limited English proficiency. NIMHD is committed to supporting research and communications efforts to improve cultural competency and health literacy.

NLM History of Medicine Lecture on April 6

On April 2, 1917, US President Woodrow Wilson asked Congress to declare war against Germany, stating that “The world must be made safe for democracy.” Four days later, on April 6, Congress voted overwhelmingly in favor of a war declaration. As part of the 2017 History of Medicine Lectures, the National Library of Medicine marks this important occasion with a forum spotlighting some of its rich collections related to the war and the American experience of the period, World War I Centenary Forum: Stories from the Collections of the National Library of Medicine. The session will be live-streamed globally on Thursday, April 6, 11:00am-12:30pm PDT through NIH Videocasting and will include a variety of stories drawn from these collections, shared by colleagues in the NLM’s History of Medicine Division.

Request for Comments on Proposals for Revision of the Standards for Maintaining, Collecting, and Presenting Federal Data on Race and Ethnicity

The Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Executive Office of the President, Office of Management and Budget (OMB), requests comments on the proposals that it has received from the Federal Interagency Working Group for Research on Race and Ethnicity for revisions to OMB’s Standards for Maintaining, Collecting, and Presenting Federal Data on Race and Ethnicity. Comments must be provided in writing to OMB no later than 60 days from the publication of the Federal Register Notice (published 3/1/2017).

New Full Text Access Feature in PubMed: Institutional Repository LinkOut!

PubMed users can now see the icon that links to the full text deposited at an institutional repository (IR) using LinkOut. The LinkOut service provides links to full text, library holdings, and other relevant external resources from PubMed and other NCBI databases. Until this year, there were three quick ways to access full text articles from PubMed:

  • the publisher icon links to the journal web site (may require a subscription to the journal)
  • the PMC icon links to free full text in PubMed Central (PMC)
  • the DOI (Digital Object Identifier) links to the article on the journal web site (may require a subscription to the journal)

The new institutional repository icons will link to free full text of the article at an institutional repository that it is not freely available from the journal or PMC. When an IR is participating in this new LinkOut feature, the linking icon will display in the “Full text links” section next to the abstract in PubMed for any publication with a direct link to a full text that does not have another free full text link. The “LinkOut – more resources” section expands to show the same direct links to full text as the icons. All links to participating IRs will appear whether or not there is a free full text icon displayed in the “Full text links” section. There are only a few IRs participating in the free full text LinkOut at this time but these few already expand access to about 25,000 publications. Some academic and research institutions encourage or require authors to submit their publications in the IR, making them publicly accessible within the terms of publication at a journal. This is often called “green open access.” There might be an embargo period or delay after publication, as there can be with NIH-authored manuscripts in PMC. However, free full texts can be available as soon as an article is published.

LinkOut resources come from organizations that have applied to join LinkOut, providing information or data that are relevant to that specific publication. LinkOut participants include libraries, biological data repositories, and repositories like Dryad and Figshare. If you know of an IR that has publicly available free full texts beyond those available in PMC, please let them know about this service. A list of participating institutional repositories is available from the LinkOut Web site. Instructions for institutional repositories to join LinkOut are also available. For questions about participating in LinkOut, contact NLM. Additional details and sample screen displays are available in the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Save the Date for “Consequential and Reproducible Clinical Research: Charting the Course for Continuous Improvement” Conference at NLM June 14-15

Registration is available for the 2017 Annual Conference of the Friends of the National Library of Medicine, Consequential and Reproducible Clinical Research: Charting the Course for Continuous Improvement, to be held June 14-15 at NLM’s Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications Building. The conference will discuss prevention of non-repeatable research and inconsequential studies, highlight positive strategies to achieve trustworthy results and significant quality improvement in clinical research studies. The constructive and practical messages should benefit producers as well as users of clinical research discoveries. The meeting is co-sponsored by the National Library of Medicine and Research!America. The early-bird discount registration deadline is April 30. Additional information will be provided soon for recommended travel, accommodations, and the conference program.

NLM Resources for National Native American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day: March 20, 2017

Today is National Native American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Health outreach professionals can access HIV/AIDS resources for Native American communities through multiple National Library of Medicine websites, including the following:

  • American Indian Health – Check the “Health Topics – HIV/AIDS” section of American Indian Health for links to HIV/AIDS resources for Native American individuals and communities, for researchers/health professionals/educators, programs and organizations working to treat and prevent HIV/AIDS among Native Americans, and health information about HIV/AIDS for everyone.
  • AIDSource – Look under the Specific Populations:Native Americans section of AIDSource for HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, education, and research resources related to HIV/AIDS in Native American communities.
  • PubMed – For the latest biomedical research related to HIV/AIDS among Native American populations, visit PubMed.

NLM Mourns the Loss of Faye G. Abdellah, former Deputy Surgeon General and NLM Board of Regents member

Deputy Surgeon General Faye G. Abdellah, RN, MA, EdD, died on February 24, 2017, at the age of 97. Dr. Abdellah was a nurse, educator, and deputy surgeon general of the Public Health Service. She served as the U.S Surgeon General’s alternate ex-officio member of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine from 1972-1989. Her accomplishments include being the first nurse and woman to serve as Deputy Surgeon General of the United States (1981-1989), the highest ranked woman and nurse in the Federal Nursing Services when she achieved the rank of Rear Admiral, and the founder and first dean of the Graduate School of Nursing at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences.

As possibly the longest serving member of the NLM Board of Regents, Dr. Abdellah gave presentations that updated board members on many public health issues, including smoking, pediatric AIDS, and drunk driving. She contributed to Board policies that shaped NLM programs and services and to the NLM Long-Range Plan for 1986-2006. Dr. Abdellah was recognized internationally for her contributions to nursing research. She was known for creating a typology of 21 areas of focus for nurses, divided into three classes: physical, sociological and emotional needs of the patient; types of nurse-patient interpersonal relationships; and common elements of patient care. She advocated for nursing education to be research based, for nurses teaching self-care to patients, and an interdisciplinary approach to care.

Dr. Abdellah was adamant about the need for education based on science very early in her career. When she first taught nursing students at Yale University, she was so frustrated with the National League of Nursing guidelines because they had no scientific basis that she burned a stack of their curriculum guides in the Yale Courtyard. She told the Journal of Nursing Scholarship that it took her a year to pay for the books she burned. An obituary for Dr. Abdellah has been published.

Health Conditions Among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Adults

In 2014, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) conducted the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander National Health Interview Survey (NHPI NHIS). The survey involved about 3,000 households containing one or more NHPI residents who were surveyed by NHIS field staff using the 2014 NHIS instrument. The NHPI NHIS was an unprecedented opportunity to collect rich and accurate information from a large NHPI sample about the health of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in all 50 states. In March, 2017, the NCHS released the Data Brief on the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander National Health Interview Survey (NHPI NHIS). Key findings include:

  • The age-sex-adjusted percentages of NHPI adults with fair or poor health (15.5%), serious psychological distress (4.1% in past 30 days), cancer (5.7%), coronary heart disease (6.0%), diabetes (15.6%), lower back pain (28.5% in past 3 months), arthritis (19.7%), migraines (14.1% in past 3 months), and asthma (9.9%) were  greater than the corresponding percentages for single-race Asian adults.
  • NHPI adults were more likely than all U.S. adults to be in fair or poor health, to have diabetes, and to have ever had asthma, but they were less likely to have cancer.

Galinsky AM, Zelaya CE, Barnes PM, Simile C. Selected Health Conditions Among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Adults: United States 2014NCHS Data Brief 277 March, 2017.

Thanks to Sela V. Panapasa, PhD, from the University of Michigan, for alerting us.