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Archive for the ‘Social networking’ Category

Three Ways to Find Health Twitter Chats!

Twitter chats are a great way for healthcare professionals to learn about resources related to specific health topics, raise public awareness of heath issues, and share their organization’s resources with other professionals and the general public. During a Twitter chat, one or more accounts hosting the chat will pose questions through their tweets, and attendees of the chat will answer the questions through tweets that include a hashtag specific to the chat, e.g., #HIVAgingChat. Following are three ways to locate Twitter chats related to health and wellness topics, which healthcare professionals on Twitter may wish to attend:

  • Follow NLM Twitter Handles: If you follow NLM_OSP, the Twitter account for the National Library of Medicine Outreach and Special Populations Branch, then you’ll often see announcements on upcoming Twitter chats related to health awareness and outreach topics. There are currently 18 Twitter accounts maintained by NLM, and many of the accounts promote and participate in health-related Twitter chats on a regular basis.
  • Check FYI Weekly Health Resources Newsletter: The Office of Minority Health publishes a weekly email bulletin called FYI: Weekly Health Resources, which lists information on grants, fellowships/scholarships, program resources, and more, including upcoming Twitter chats related to minority health.
  • Check the Twitter Chat Schedule on Symplur: The website Symplur tracks popular healthcare-related hashtags and also includes a weekly schedule of healthcare Twitter chats, with a list of upcoming one-time and irregularly scheduled chat sessions.

News Resources from the National Library of Medicine

The National Library of Medicine releases new tools and updated resources on a regular basis. To easily find the latest highlights on these updates, NLM offers a number of news feeds, blogs, bulletins, and social media accounts, including:

  • News from Specialized Information Services (SIS) Division: Learn about the latest updates from Outreach and Special Populations Branch, Disaster Information Management Research Center, Environmental Health and Toxicology, and more.
  • NLM News and Events: View the latest announcements, press releases, videos, and links to newsletters, RSS feeds, and the professional meeting exhibit schedule for the NLM.
  • NLM in Focus: This blog features detailed posts about major events, resources, and news from the NLM.
  • NLM Technical Bulletin: Learn about updates to the content and user interfaces for many of the online resources from NLM, especially PubMed.
  • NLM on Social Media: Follow the NLM through Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, or join an email list to get the latest updates in your inbox. Also learn about the social media accounts and email update lists for SIS.

NLM 4 Caregivers Project

The project NLM 4 Caregivers is designed to increase awareness of NLM resources among family caregivers who actively seek health information online using social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, blogs, and listservs, for discussing and exploring health issues. NLM 4 Caregivers discusses a wide variety of resources for searching and managing medications, such as PillBox and DailyMed, tools for locating clinical trials (, and tools for accessing both consumer health information (MedlinePlus) and the latest biomedical research (PubMed).

NLM 4 Caregivers shares health resources relevant to caregivers through many mediums, such as:

NCBI Launches New Twitter Feed for NCBI Bookshelf Announcements

NCBI has a new Twitter feed, @ncbibooks, to announce new books and documents available on the NCBI Bookshelf. An online resource providing free access to the full text of books and documents in life sciences and health care, the Bookshelf currently provides access to over 4,500 titles.

The Bookshelf is continuously expanding with new materials as well as receiving updates to existing books & documents. Between May 16 and May 20, 2016, for example, 19 new titles were added. Among the new titles are several Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality reports, health technology assessments and systematic reviews from Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health and National Institute for Health Research (UK), and World Health Organization guidelines on daily iron supplementation.

For general news, follow NCBI on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

MedlinePlus Launches Facebook Pages!

Looking for the latest information on diseases, condition, and wellness issues? MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español have joined Facebook! Feel free to “Like” these new pages!

MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health’s Web site for patients and their families and friends. Produced by the National Library of Medicine, the world’s largest medical library, it brings you information about diseases, conditions, and wellness issues in language you can understand. MedlinePlus offers reliable, up-to-date health information, anytime, anywhere, for free. For any questions about MedlinePlus, including its social media accounts, please use the Contact Us link that appears at the top of every MedlinePlus page to send the MedlinePlus team a message.

Measuring What Matters in Your Social Media Strategy

We’re all trying to find ways to improve evaluation of our social media efforts. It’s fun to count the number of retweets and “likes.” But are these numbers meaningful? A recent program at the American Evaluation Association Conference in Chicago, “Do Likes Save Lives? Measuring What Really Matters in Social Media and Digital Advocacy Efforts,” presented by Lisa Hilt and Rebecca Perlmutter of Oxfam, provided a presentation designed to build knowledge and skills in planning and measuring social media strategies, setting digital objectives, selecting meaningful indicators and choosing the right tools and approaches for analyzing social media data. The presenters did not want to rely solely on what they called “vanity metrics,” for example the number of “impressions” or “likes.”  Alone these metrics show very little actual engagement with the information. Instead they chose to focus on specific social media objectives based on their overall digital strategy.

Develop a digital strategy:

  • Connect the overall digital strategy to campaign objectives: (for example: To influence a concrete change in policy, or to change the debate on a particular issue.)

Develop social media objectives:

  • You want people to be exposed to your message.
  • Then you want people to engage with it (for example, sharing your message) or make them work with it (for example: sign an online petition after reading it.)

Collect specific information based on objectives:

  • Collect data about social media engagement supporting your objectives that can be measured (for example “the Oxfam Twitter campaign drove 15% of the readers to signing its petition” vs. “we got 1500 likes”.)

The presenters suggested some types of more meaningful metrics:

  • On Twitter you can look at the number of profiles who take the action you want them to take, and then the number of tweets or retweets about your topic.
  • For Facebook, the number of likes, shares and comments mean that your audience was definitely exposed to your message.
  • Changes in the rate of likes or follows (for example if you normally get 5 new followers to your fan page a week, but due to a particular campaign strategy, you suddenly started getting 50 new followers a week.)
  • Number of “influential” supporters.
  • Qualitative analysis: Consider analyzing comments on Facebook posts, or conversation around a hashtag in Twitter.

Overall, the goal is to have a plan for how you would like to see people interact with your messages in relation to your overall organizational and digital strategies, and find metrics to see if your plan worked.

Structured Abstracts in MEDLINE: Newly Identified and Mapped Labels Available

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has updated its list of structured abstract labels. This updated list, along with the NLM-assigned broader category mappings, can be downloaded for free from the Structured Abstracts resource page which also provides NLM guidelines and other background information to assist licensees or researchers. A grand total of 4,702 citations (whether in process, MEDLINE, or PubMed-not-MEDLINE status) were revised so that the new labels include the NLM Category mapping in the XML data, effective on or about October 26, 2015. Of interest, the new label ‘TWEETABLE ABSTRACT’ (mapped to the NLM Category ‘CONCLUSIONS’) illustrates the impact of social media. Read more about Structured Abstracts in MEDLINE/PubMed.

NIH Observes National Native American Heritage Month in November

November is National Native American Heritage Month (NNAHM), a time to recognize the accomplishments of this country’s first inhabitants. As the early inhabitants of this land, the native peoples of North America have their own tribal orientations, language origins, and cultural histories. Today, many healing techniques that are practiced have been adopted from traditions that originate from various Native American tribes. This year’s NNAHM theme, Tribal Diversity: Weaving Together Our Traditions, highlights spirituality as an inseparable element of healing in medicine. Healing the physical parts of a patient is not enough; one must acknowledge the importance of emotional wellness, as influenced by Native American rituals and traditions.

This month is dedicated to building new avenues of opportunity for Native Americans by making critical investments to improve health, to strengthen tribal communities, and to promote educational opportunities at the NIH. Maintaining an inclusive biomedical research workforce with a diversity of talent is critical to the NIH mission of fostering new discoveries and promoting the highest level of scientific integrity to improve the nation’s health. NNAHM allows the opportunity for every individual to learn more about the distinctive backgrounds and heritages of Native Americans. You can show support during National Native American Heritage Month by actively engaging with the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion’s (EDI’s) social media campaign, including the month-long NIH Twitter campaign. More information is located on the Strategist for the Native American Portfolio website.

New Videos Available on the NCBI YouTube Channel

Two new three-minute videos on the NCBI YouTube channel will provide information about how to view track sets in all of the NCBI genome browsers and Sequence Viewer displays and how to store and share custom sets of tracks in track collections. NCBI Recommended Tracks presents track sets, which allow you to instantly tailor your display to a specific need, while My NCBI Track Collections: Introduction shows how to store and share tracks in custom sets called track collections. To learn more about track sets and collections, visit the FAQ on the Sequence Viewer page. Subscribe to the NCBI YouTube channel to receive alerts about new videos ranging from quick tips to full webinar presentations.

Medicare Facebook Page Launched!

As part of the 50th anniversary celebration of Medicare and Medicaid, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has just launched the official Medicare Facebook page, which will serve as an informational resource for those who will soon enroll in Medicare and people currently on Medicare. The Medicare and Medicaid programs were signed into law on July 30, 1965, by President Lyndon B. Johnson. For 50 years, these programs have been protecting the health and well-being of millions of American families, saving lives, and improving the economic security of our nation. Though Medicare and Medicaid started as basic insurance programs for Americans who didn’t have health insurance, they have changed over the years to provide more and more Americans with access to the quality and affordable health care they need.

During the summer of 2015, CMS will mark the anniversary of these programs by recognizing the ways in which these programs have transformed the nation’s health care system over the past five decades. Use the following resources to help spread the word!


  • #KeepingUpWithGrandma
  •  #Medicare
  • #KeepingUSHealthy

Medicare 50th anniversary pages: