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Archive for the ‘Search Tools’ Category

NLM Cataloging News for 2016

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) adopted the 2016 MeSH vocabulary for cataloging on November 23, 2015. Accordingly, MeSH subject headings in LocatorPlus were changed to reflect the 2016 MeSH vocabulary and appear in that form as of November 23, 2015. When year-end processing (YEP) activities are completed in mid-December, the NLM Catalog, MeSH database, and translation tables will be updated to reflect 2016 MeSH. Until then, there will be a hiatus in the addition of new and edited bibliographic records to the NLM Catalog. The Index to the NLM Classification will not reflect 2016 MeSH changes until Spring 2016. In general, the Cataloging Section implemented the vocabulary changes in NLM bibliographic records for books, serials, and other materials, as they were applied for citations in MEDLINE. Highlights of the changes are available in the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Subject Changes in NLM Distributed Records

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) reminds libraries that beginning with the December 2015 distribution of new records in CATFILE and SERFILE, NLM subject terms (MeSH) will be distributed with topical subjects recorded in 650 $a or 650 $a $x; geographic subjects recorded in 651 $a or 651 $a $x; and publication type/genre terms record in 655 $a. In January 2016, the entire CATFILE and SERFILE databases will be released with these updates made to all the records. NLM recommends that libraries that want their data to be consistent with the NLM files download the full update.

Catalogers in other libraries that use MeSH are encouraged to follow NLM practice in assigning their subjects. Under no circumstances should a library edit a record in OCLC to re-create a string and remove the 651 and 655 fields. Any desired editing should be done only in your local catalog. After January 2016, libraries will be required to establish medical subjects in a deconstructed format in OCLC. OCLC will be updating all records with 650 fields with a second indicator of 2 to follow the new NLM practice in January. NLM is working with authority vendors to provide guidance on how local catalogs can be updated. The Program for Cooperative Cataloging will soon be issuing guidelines for BIBCO and CONSER libraries that use MeSH. The new guidelines will take effect January 1, 2016.

Structured Abstracts in MEDLINE: Newly Identified and Mapped Labels Available

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has updated its list of structured abstract labels. This updated list, along with the NLM-assigned broader category mappings, can be downloaded for free from the Structured Abstracts resource page which also provides NLM guidelines and other background information to assist licensees or researchers. A grand total of 4,702 citations (whether in process, MEDLINE, or PubMed-not-MEDLINE status) were revised so that the new labels include the NLM Category mapping in the XML data, effective on or about October 26, 2015. Of interest, the new label ‘TWEETABLE ABSTRACT’ (mapped to the NLM Category ‘CONCLUSIONS’) illustrates the impact of social media. Read more about Structured Abstracts in MEDLINE/PubMed.

MeSH Browser Now Includes Link to 2016 MeSH

The default year in NLM’s MeSH Browser is currently 2015 MeSH, with an alternate link that now provides access to 2016 MeSH. Access to two years of MeSH vocabulary is always available in the MeSH Browser, the current year and an alternate year. Sometime in November or December, the default year will change to 2016 MeSH and the alternate link to the 2015 MeSH. Details on updates and download information for 2016 MeSH are forthcoming.

Change to Subject Headings in Distributed NLM CATLINE and SERLINE Products

In June 2015, NLM proposed discontinuing distribution of its bibliographic records with artificially reconstructed subject strings in CATLINE and SERLINE products, as detailed in the NLM Technical Bulletin article Discontinuing Distribution of Cataloging Bibliographic Records with Artificially Reconstructed Subject Strings—Comment by August 31, 2015. This proposal was sent to the Regional Medical Libraries, MEDLIB, and MEDCAT discussion lists, as well as to subscribers of the NLM MARC21 files. Responses to the proposal were unanimously in favor of discontinuing the distribution of subject strings and having the records in the distributed files match the records as they appear in LocatorPlus and the NLM Catalog.

Therefore, NLM is pleased to announce that beginning with the December 2015 distribution of new records in CATFILE and SERFILE, NLM subject terms will be distributed with topical subjects recorded in 650 $a or 650 $a $x; geographic subjects recorded in 651 $a or 651 $a $x; and publication type/genre terms record in 655 $a. In January 2016, the entire CATFILE and SERFILE databases will be released with these updates made to all the records. Libraries that want their data to be consistent with the NLM files are encouraged to download the full update.

NLM Resource Update: TOXMAP Has Updated Per Capita Personal Income Data

Per capita personal income data is now complete for 1988-2013 in the National Library of Medicine’s TOXMAP beta resource. To overlay income data, navigate to the “Income” tab of the “US Census & Health” window, accessible via the Welcome window or the toolbar at the top of the page, and then select a year from the list. The United States Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is part of the US Department of Commerce. It produces “economic accounts” statistics that enable government and business decision-makers, researchers, and the American public to follow and understand the performance of the nation’s economy. To do this, the BEA collects source data, conducts research and analysis, develops and implements estimation methodologies, and disseminates statistics to the public. TOXMAP is a Geographic Information System (GIS) from the Division of Specialized Information Services of the NLM that uses maps of the United States to help users visually explore data from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and Superfund Program, as well as some non-EPA datasets.

MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing Activities During Fall 2015

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is currently involved in MEDLINE year-end processing (YEP) activities. These include changing the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) main headings and subheadings as well as Supplementary Concept Records that standardize names and associated numbers for chemicals, protocols, and diseases that are not main headings. The MeSH edits include maintaining existing MEDLINE citations to conform with the 2016 version of MeSH, and other global changes.

Important Dates

  • November 18, 2015: NLM expects to temporarily suspend the addition of fully-indexed MEDLINE citations to PubMed. NLM will continue to add Publisher-supplied and in process citations.
  • Mid-December 2015: PubMed MEDLINE citations, translation tables, and the MeSH database will have been updated to reflect 2016 MeSH.

For details about the impact on searching from November 19 to mid-December, see: Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Impact on Searching During Fall 2015. For background information on the general kinds of changes made annually, see: Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Background Information.

New Mobile App Connects HIV Providers, Advocates, and People Living with HIV/AIDS to NLM HIV-Related Websites

Logo for Go2NLM Mobile App

HealthHIV, in partnership with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has announced the launch of the Go2NLM mobile application. Building on its Navigate to Learn More publication, HealthHIV created the Go2NLM app to provide information about and direct access to NLM’s authoritative HIV-related websites to HIV providers, advocates, and people living with HIV/AIDS. The app features dynamic content, including updates about new and highlighted HIV technical assistance and capacity building tools and resources promoted by NLM.

The websites featured on the Go2NLM app are:

The application will soon be available for download from HealthHIV, as well as the Apple and Google app stores. For more information about the Go2NLM project, please contact HealthHIV.

New PubMed Link: “Articles Frequently Viewed Together”

PubMed has introduced a new type of link called “Articles Frequently Viewed Together” to assist with locating important articles on a given topic. For some PubMed abstracts, this feature will appear in the “Related Information” section in the right column. Currently, only 1.3 million out of the 24 million records in PubMed have this link. The calculation is based on anonymous click data for the last year, so older articles will be especially underrepresented. To find all articles with these relationships, search PubMed with the query “pubmed_pubmed_alsoviewed[filter]” and add additional terms to narrow the focus to your area of interest.

NLM Hosting 2015 DailyMed/RxNorm Jamboree Workshop on September 24!

Registration and agenda information for the National Library of Medicine’s third annual DailyMed/RxNorm Jamboree Workshop is now available. The Jamboree is a free public meeting to be held on September 24, 2015, 9:30 am to 4:15 pm EDT, at the Lister Hill Auditorium on the NLM campus in Bethesda, MD. The session will also be webcast and archived for future viewing. Registration is required for attendance. Since 2015 marks the 10th anniversary of DailyMed, the meeting will feature a retrospective look at how industry has made use of DailyMed during that time.

Featured speakers will include representatives from the federal government, industry, academia and non-profit sectors. Speakers from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention, and Avalere Health will talk about biosimilars naming. Ed Millikan, representing the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, will present an extended look at Risk Evaluation and Mediation Strategies. The meeting emphasis is on practical and novel ways to use and understand this free drug information, which is produced and consumed by a number of federal agencies.