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Archive for the ‘Search Tools’ Category

New Online Class in PubMed® for Librarians Series: Using Evidence-Based Search Features!

Registration is available for the new 90-minute instructional webinar PubMed® for Librarians: Using Evidence-Based Search Features, on Wednesday, November 16, from 10:00-11:30 AM PST. It is a synchronous online session that includes hands-on exercises. The session will explore Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) used for indexing study design and how they work in PubMed, introduce three PubMed products that facilitate evidence based searching, and demonstrate how to customize My NCBI Filters to quickly locate specific publication types. It is an expansion of the popular PubMed for Librarians series from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO).

PubMed for Librarians is made up of six 90-minute sessions, which are presented via WebEx and recorded for archival access. Each session is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend. Each session is certified for 1.5 MLA (Medical Library Association) CE (Continuing Education) hours. CE credit is not available for viewing recordings.

NLM Announces the Addition of the Louis Sokoloff Papers to Profiles in Science

Louis Sokoloff (1921-2015) was an American physician and neuroscientist whose innovative research methods and tools transformed the study of brain structure and function. During nearly six decades at the National Institute of Mental Health, he developed new experimental methods, combining techniques and mathematical descriptions from biochemistry, enzyme kinetics, and physiological studies to accurately measure cerebral blood flow and metabolism. Using radioactive 2-deoxyglucose tracers, he was able to make real-time images of living animal brains under various physiological conditions, showing which brain regions were most active at a given moment. This work, which definitively linked regional metabolic activity to particular brain functions, constituted a quantum leap for brain-mapping research. It was also rapidly adapted to positron emission tomography (PET) scanning technology, which soon became essential for studying and diagnosing brain disorders and many types of cancer. He received a Lasker Award in 1981 in recognition of this important “bench-to-bedside” translational research.

Now available from the National Library of Medicine is a selection from the papers of Dr. Sokoloff, on the National Library of Medicine’s Profiles in Science® Web site. Profiles in Science is a digital project of the Library that provides online access to archival collections of twentieth- and twenty-first century leaders in science, medicine, and public health. The Louis Sokoloff Papers Profiles in Science site features correspondence, published articles, interviews, and photographs from the Louis Sokoloff Papers held by NLM. Visitors to Profiles in Science can view, for example, photos from Sokoloff’s childhood and early career, correspondence with colleagues and students, and experimental brain images produced with the tracers he developed. An in-depth historical narrative leads to a wide range of primary source materials that provide a window into Sokoloff’s life and major contributions to neuroscience.  Visitors may also view a brief chronology of Sokoloff’s life, a glossary of terms specific to the collection, and a further readings page, as well as search and browse the collection.

NLM Resource Guide Responds to Hurricane Matthew

National Library of Medicine (NLM) Disaster Health is responding to recent events with a Hurricane Matthew Health Related Resources Guide.

The guide includes links to:

  • Federal and state-specific resources
  • Social media for situational awareness
  • Situation reports
  • Maps
  • Public health information
  • General hurricane information and more

The guide will be updated as new information becomes available. You can also Follow the Hurricane Matthew Twitter list of reliable sources!

Participate in the Healthy People 2020 Public Comment Process October 6-27!

You are invited to participate in the upcoming Healthy People 2020 public comment process, which will be open from October 6 through October 27, 2016. The Healthy People team is seeking comments on an objective that is being considered as a potential addition to the HIV topic area. The proposed objective was developed by the HIV workgroup, which is led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). It has been reviewed by the Healthy People 2020 Federal Interagency Workgroup (FIW), and is now being presented for public review and comment. All comments received will be carefully reviewed by the HIV workgroup, the Healthy People 2020 FIW, and other Healthy People 2020 stakeholders.

NLM Announces Important Dates for MEDLINE/PubMed 2017 Year-End Processing Activities

The National Library of Medicine is currently involved in MEDLINE year-end processing (YEP) activities. These include changing the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) main headings and subheadings as well as Supplementary Concept Records that standardize names and associated numbers for chemicals, protocols, and diseases that are not main headings. The MeSH edits include maintaining existing MEDLINE citations to conform with the 2017 version of MeSH, and other global changes.

Important Dates

  • November 15, 2016: NLM expects to temporarily suspend the addition of fully-indexed MEDLINE citations to PubMed. NLM will continue to add Publisher-supplied and in process citations.
  • Mid-December 2016: PubMed MEDLINE citations, translation tables, and the MeSH database will have been updated to reflect 2017 MeSH.

For details about the impact on searching from November 16 to mid-December, visit Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Impact on Searching During Fall 2016. For background information on the general kinds of changes made annually, visit Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Background Information.

NLM Policy Change for Identification of Partial Retractions in MEDLINE/PubMed

The National Library of Medicine began keeping separate statistics on partial retractions in December 2006 and reporting them on the MEDLINE Key Indicators page when a journal identified an article as partially retracted. In 2006, NLM expected that partial retractions would be a new designation that publishers would be using. These were cases when some aspect of the article, such as a table, chart, image, etc., was determined to be incorrect, but the overall methodology or conclusion(s) of the paper were not affected. Since 2006, only 42 articles have been designated as “partially retracted.” In addition, the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Retraction Guidelines state that partial retractions make it difficult for users to know which parts of an article are or are not reliable or the correct status of the article.

Beginning in October 2016, NLM will discontinue the identification of partial retractions in MEDLINE/PubMed. Previously, the Retracted Publication designation was added as a Publication Type to the citation for the article, which also triggered the Retracted Article banner on the Abstract display in PubMed, and Retraction of Publication was used as the Publication Type for the notice citation. NLM also linked the citations using a “Partial retraction in” label on the article citation and a “Partial retraction of” label on the notice citation. Instead, this type of notice will be treated as a published erratum. NLM will no longer use the retraction-related Publication Types on these citations, and the Retracted Article banner will no longer appear on the Abstract display; the notice citation will have Published Erratum as the Publication Type. The citations will continue to be linked, but will use an “Erratum in” label on the article citation and an “Erratum for” label on the notice citation, as is the case for other errata/correction notices. NLM has edited the existing 42 pairs of citations to reflect the new policy and the “Errata” Fact Sheet has been edited to reflect the new policy.

New Webinar Series: Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data

On Wednesday, October 19, 11:00am – 12:00pm PDT, NLM will host the first session of a new Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data series of webinars, beginning with Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed. The webinar series will promote more powerful and flexible ways of accessing NLM data, starting with an introduction to the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for PubMed and other NCBI databases. The series is geared toward librarians and other information specialists who have experience using PubMed via the traditional Web interface, but now want to dig deeper. This class will start with the very basics of APIs, and then move on to showing how to get started using the E-utilities API to search and retrieve records from PubMed. The class will also showcase some specific tools and utilities that information specialists can use to work with E-utilities, helping to prepare for subsequent Insider’s Guide classes. The session will conclude by looking at some practical examples of E-utilities in the real world, and hopefully inspire you to get out and put these lessons to use!

Health Hotlines Database To Be Retired January 2017

Health Hotlines was developed by NLM as a community service to help the public locate health-related information from organizations with toll free numbers. NLM has decided it will no longer update the Health Hotlines database because most of the information is now readily available through web search engines and many of the organizations no longer have toll-free numbers. Health Hotlines will remain online until the end of January, 2017, at which time it will be retired.

Complementary Therapies and Traditional Healing Resources from NLM

Medical treatments not considered part of mainstream medicine are often called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Examples include herbal supplements, acupuncture, meditation, and other forms of treatment. NLM’s Arctic Health portal defines traditional healing as treatment that focuses on the health and wellness of the individual in the context of culture and community, and it incorporates Native beliefs, practices, and traditional ecological knowledge. Traditional healing may be practiced by Native American communities across the U.S., including Alaska and the Arctic region. Resources for both complementary medicine and traditional healing are available through the National Library of Medicine for many different populations, including:

  • For the General Public – MedlinePlus provides an overview of various complementary and alternative therapy health topics, as well as reliable information on the health benefits and possible side effects for a long list of herbs and supplements.
  • For Older Adults – NIH Senior Health discusses a variety of topics on complementary health approaches, including information on natural products, mind and body practices, the safety of these complementary health approaches, and how to be an informed consumer with complementary health treatments.
  • For Native American Communities – The American Indian Health portal includes a list of traditional healing resources, with resources for community members, researchers, health professionals, educators, and the general public. The Traditional Healing section of the Arctic Health portal lists organizations and programs, stories, research and learning tools, and teaching tools for traditional healing practices of Native American communities in the Arctic region.

Retention of Ceased Abstracting and Indexing Publications Containing MEDLINE Citations

Does your collection include abstracting and indexing titles produced in cooperation with NLM, such as Hospital Literature Index and/or its successor Hospital and Health Administration Index, Index to Dental Literature, or International Nursing Index, all of which had ceased publication by the year 2000? In general, the NLM-derived citations in these publications are available in MEDLINE/PubMed. However, all of these publications also contained separate sections for monographic materials, which may not be available in the NLM collection. Therefore, NLM advises librarians that if access to the monographic materials in these tools are important at your institution, then retain these old print indexes in your collection. More details about each publication are available in this FAQ.