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Archive for the ‘Search Tools’ Category

New Navigation Resources Available on AIDSource

NLM’s AIDSource now offers PrEP Navigation Resources and HIV Navigation Resources. These resources, selected by subject matter experts, are designed to assist frontline “navigators” who work with affected populations. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a once daily pill that helps protect against HIV. Resources include basic information about PrEP and navigator training tools. The HIV navigation resources cover retention in HIV care and tools for patient navigators. Both sets of navigation resources link to content for Spanish speakers.

Registration Available for the February/March 2017 NLM Webinar Series: “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”

Beginning February 21, 2017, the National Library of Medicine will present the three-part Webinar series, Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed. This series of workshops will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of three 90-minute sessions, students will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

Registration is currently open for the February/March 2017 series:

  • Part 1: Getting PubMed Data, Tuesday, February 21, 10:00 – 11:30 AM PST
  • Part 2: Extracting Data from XML, Tuesday, February 28, 10:00 – 11:30 AM PST
  • Part 3: Building Practical Solutions, Tuesday, March 7, 10:00 – 11:30 AM PST

Students are expected to attend Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 in a single series. Due to the nature of this class, registration will be limited to 50 students per offering.

This series of classes involves hands-on demonstrations and exercises. Before registering for these classes, NLM strongly recommends the following:

  • Watch the first Insider’s Guide class “Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed” or be familiar with the basic concepts of APIs and E-utilities.
  • Be familiar with structured XML data (basic syntax, elements, attributes, etc.)
  • Have access to a Unix command-line environment on your computer (see the Installing EDirect page for more information.)
  • Install the EDirect software (see the Installing EDirect page for more information.)

NLM Announces Two New Digital Collections!

The National Library of Medicine has announced two additions to the NLM Digital Collections, the Library’s free online repository of biomedical resources including books, still images, videos, and maps.

Incunabula: A collection of books and broadsides printed in Europe before 1501 includes over forty items from the Library’s world-renowned collection of more than 580 incunabula on subjects relating to science and medicine, from printed classical works of Galen and Hippocrates to materials on the plague and other “pestilences.” Incunabula (from the Latin for “cradle”) are books and other materials produced with movable type on a printing press between the mid-1450s through the end of 1500 — the infancy of the age of printing. This digital collection will grow over time as the Library scans more incunabula titles.

World War 2, 1939-1949: A collection of U.S. government documents includes more than 1,500 federal, state, and local government publications. Among the variety of materials included are government reports, first aid manuals, informational pamphlets, and recruitment materials that demonstrate the efforts of government, military personnel, health professionals, and scientists, among others, on the home front and overseas during and immediately following the Second World War.

All of the content in NLM Digital Collections is freely available worldwide and, unless otherwise indicated, in the public domain. As with all printed materials added to the NLM Digital Collections, items from these new collections will also be included in the Internet Archive, and as part of the Medical Heritage Library through the ongoing collaboration with that international digital curation collaborative. More information about the content of these two new digital collections is available from the NLM History of Medicine Division Reference Desk.

NNLM Training Office Upcoming Classes: PubMed for Librarians Series, 2017 MeSH Highlights, Classroom Assessment on the Fly, and Discovering TOXNET

There are several class offerings coming up from the NNLM Training Office (NTO). Class details and registration links are available in the NLM Technical Bulletin, or you can visit Training Opportunities to see a schedule of classes that are open to all regions.

PubMed® for Librarians Series: Six Classes

Sessions on January 19 and 25; February 1, 8, 16, and 23, 10:00-11:30 AM PST. Learn about concepts such as using MeSH to build a search, PubMed’s Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) feature, building and refining PubMed searches, using PubMed features that facilitate evidence-based searching, and customizing PubMed searches with the NCBI feature.

Teaching Topics: Classroom Assessment on the Fly

Sessions on either January 11 or February 15, 10:00-11:00 AM PST offer a brief review of the types of assessment available and different methods to use for instantaneous feedback, from low tech polling to one-minute papers.

NLM Webinar: 2017 MeSH Highlights, January 27, 9:00-10:00 AM PST

This session provides a 30-minute highlights tour of the 2017 MeSH, followed by a Q&A with MeSH experts.

Discovering TOXNET

Running from March 1 through 31, this class offers the opportunity to discover TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases with a guided, self-paced, online format involving thirteen independent modules.

NLM’s HSRProj Database Now Available for Download

NLM has announced that the Health Services Research Projects in Progress (HSRProj) database is available for download. HSRProj is produced by the National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR) and provides access to data for research into health services research investments. Established in the 1990s, HSRProj contains searchable structured descriptions of more than 16,000 current or recently completed health services research projects from more than 350 funders, both international and domestic. While access to the entire dataset of more 30,000 records has always been available on a partial or ad hoc basis, this new XML file download is expected to greatly broaden the accessibility of the information for those interested in health services research trends by topic, funder, or researcher/research organization.

Documentation for researchers seeking to manipulate and download the full file from the FTP site is available, including a complete list of all the elements and their attributes and a sample record using the NLM DTD, as well as a description of each field and its attributes. The XML data can be used with the XML converter of your choice. An updated file will be created and posted to the FTP site on a quarterly basis in conjunction with the regular quarterly update of the HSRProj record set. The current file is October 2016. NLM anticipates retaining older files on the FTP site for at least one year, but would welcome community input on this question. File names will include the month and date of release. No license is required to obtain or use the data. Per the Terms and Conditions, the National Library of Medicine should be identified as the creator, maintainer and provider of the data, for any use that is not personal; other conditions also apply.

Search PubMed with 2017 MeSH!

As of December 12, PubMed/MEDLINE citations, the NLM Catalog, and the MeSH translation tables were updated to reflect 2017 MeSH, with full searching functionality for Supplementary Concept Record (SCR) data and mapping in place on December 14. The citations newly indexed with 2017 MeSH since November 15 were available in PubMed for searching on December 15. Now that end-of-year processing activities are complete, MEDLINE/PubMed may be searched using 2017 MeSH vocabulary. For details about data changes, visit MEDLINE Data Changes — 2017. NLM has resumed daily MEDLINE updates for PubMed.

New Human Genome Resources Portal: A Site for Exploration of the Human Genome

The new Human Genome Resources portal offers access to visualization and analysis tools available for the human genome, as well as other relevant tools like BLAST, the NCBI Genome Remapping Service, and databases that provide human molecular data. The extensive listing of learning resources is sorted into the categories of Find, View, Download, and Learn, and is designed to provide a better understanding of the wealth of information associated with the human genome. Specific goals that can be accomplished by using the site include:

2017 MEDLINE Data Changes

MeSH vocabulary has been updated for 2017. The MeSH Browser currently points to the 2017 MeSH vocabulary with a link to the 2016 MeSH Vocabulary. Searchers should consult the Browser to find MeSH headings of interest and their relationships to other headings. The Browser contains MeSH heading records that may include Scope Notes, Annotations, Entry Terms, History Notes, Allowable Qualifiers (Subheadings), Previous Indexing, and other information. It also includes Subheading records and Supplementary Concept Records (SCRs) for substances and diseases that are not MeSH headings. MEDLINE records with updated MeSH are anticipated to be in PubMed in mid-December 2016. This year 77 MeSH headings were either changed or deleted and replaced with more up-to-date terminology, and 629 new MeSH headings, including two new Publication Types, were added to MeSH in 2017. In order to improve indexing consistency and efficiency and to make MEDLINE searching easier and more straightforward, a new subheading, “diagnostic imaging,” was added. It replaces three existing subheadings; “radiography,” “radionuclide imaging,” and “ultrasonography.” For an overview of the many other 2017 MEDLINE data changes, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Cataloging and Metadata News from NLM

Starting with 2017, the NLM Classification will be moving from an annual spring update to twice-yearly updates. The winter version, to be published in mid-to-late January, will encompass changes to the NLM Classification resulting from new and changed Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms for 2017 as well as additional minor updates to the index. The summer version, to be published in mid-to-late August, will encompass the ongoing systematic review of particular classification schedules and other miscellaneous updates. The Index to the NLM Classification will reflect 2017 MeSH changes when the 2017 Winter version of the NLM Classification is published in January 2017. This update will be available four months earlier than in the past.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) adopted the 2017 MeSH vocabulary for cataloging on November 21, 2016. Accordingly, MeSH subject headings in LocatorPlus were changed to reflect the 2017 MeSH vocabulary and appear in that form as of November 21, 2016. When year-end processing (YEP) activities are completed in mid-December, the NLM Catalog database and translation tables will be updated to reflect 2017 MeSH. Until then, there will be a hiatus in the addition of new and edited bibliographic records to the NLM Catalog.

The subheading “Calendars” and “Study Guide.” They will not be used by MEDLINE indexers. For additional information, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

New Web-Based Broadband Health Mapping Tool!

The Federal Communications Commission’s Connect2Health Task Force recently launched the Mapping Broadband Health in America tool, a web-based mapping tool that enables more efficient, data-driven decision making at the intersection of broadband and health. By allowing users to ask and answer questions about broadband and health at the county and census block levels, the tool provides critical data that can help drive broadband health policies and connected health solutions for this critical space. The mapping tool is an interactive experience, showing various aspects of connectivity and health for every state and county in the United States. Users can generate customized maps that display broadband access, adoption and speed data alongside various health measures (e.g., obesity, diabetes, disabilities and physician access) in urban and rural areas. These maps can be used by both public and private sectors and local communities to identify not only gaps, but also opportunities. Also released with the mapping platform are the Priority 100 and Rural 100 lists, identifying counties that have critical needs in broadband and health. Priority 100 is a list of the 100 counties nationwide with the greatest broadband and connectivity needs and populations of at least 25,000. Rural 100 is similar to Priority 100, but only includes rural areas with a population of 15,000 or more. Additional information is available in the Press Kit.

On November 10, 11:00am-12:00pm PST, the FCC’s Connect2Health Task Force and the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau’s Office of Intergovernmental Affairs will jointly host a free webinar to further explain and explore this new tool, Mapping Connected Health County by County. The session will focus on how state and local government offices, agencies and other local community stakeholders can effectively use the Mapping Broadband Health in America platform. Key audiences for the webinar include federal, state and local agencies and offices that address health, connectivity, technology and/or rural development; such as county health departments, public health officers and epidemiologists, broadband and technology officers, data analytics and GIS teams, and community health workers and strategists.