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Archive for the ‘PubMed’ Category

October Midday at the Oasis Recording Now Available!

On October 19, NN/LM PSR presented NLM Drug Information Services for the Midday at the Oasis monthly webinar. Patrick McLaughlin, from MEDLARS Management, covered a wealth of NLM websites. He covered MedlinePlus, PubMed Health, DailyMed, Dietary Supplement Label Database, Pillbox, RxImage, TOXNET’s HSDB and LactMed, and PubChem. For terminologies, he showed RxNorm, RxNav, RxClass, and UMLS. Last but not least, the Drug Information Portal was highlighted! You can view the webinar by visiting our Midday at the Oasis Archives page or by clicking on the YouTube video player below.

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New Online Class in PubMed® for Librarians Series: Using Evidence-Based Search Features!

Registration is available for the new 90-minute instructional webinar PubMed® for Librarians: Using Evidence-Based Search Features, on Wednesday, November 16, from 10:00-11:30 AM PST. It is a synchronous online session that includes hands-on exercises. The session will explore Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) used for indexing study design and how they work in PubMed, introduce three PubMed products that facilitate evidence based searching, and demonstrate how to customize My NCBI Filters to quickly locate specific publication types. It is an expansion of the popular PubMed for Librarians series from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO).

PubMed for Librarians is made up of six 90-minute sessions, which are presented via WebEx and recorded for archival access. Each session is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend. Each session is certified for 1.5 MLA (Medical Library Association) CE (Continuing Education) hours. CE credit is not available for viewing recordings.

MEDLINE Marks Its 45th Year!

October 2016 marks the 45th anniversary of MEDLINE! The NLM Technical Bulletin has published an article with a timeline chart showing notable MEDLINE and current events occurring in 1971, 2006, and the present day. Also included is an infographic presentation of some of the information in the chart. Much has changed since 1971, when MEDLINE included 236 indexed journals and operated on an IBM 360/50 mainframe computer. Today it includes 5,618 indexed journals and PubMed runs on approximately 62 standard Linux servers! In 1971 The French Connection won the Best Picture Academy Award and Joy to the World by Three Dog Night was the #1 song according to Billboard Magazine. In 2016, the final videocassette recorder was manufactured by the Japanese company Funai and in January Adele’s Hello was the #1 song.

Report Citation Errors in PubMed Directly to Publishers

The PubMed Data Management System (PMDM), which allows publishers or their authorized representatives to update or correct nearly all elements of their citations, is now available. PubMed users should report basic citation errors in PubMed data directly to the publisher, including errors in author names, affiliations, or citation bibliographic information (such as date of publication, volume, issue, and page or e-location), typographical errors in titles or abstracts, and errors in grants or databanks. PMDM is a secure Web application for PubMed data providers to access and edit their PubMed citation data. Nearly all citation elements can be updated at any time after initial receipt of their records by PubMed. The vast majority of PubMed citations are supplied electronically by publishers or their representatives, and the PMDM was created to improve the ease and timeliness for publishers to update and correct their own citations. Changes made in the PMDM are reflected in PubMed within 24-48 hours.

With the implementation of PMDM, NLM is no longer routinely updating or correcting publisher-supplied citations. Users who report citation errors in PubMed to NLM will be directed to contact the publisher directly. NLM will continue to receive and investigate error reports about value-added data on the citations, for example, MeSH Headings and Subheadings, Supplementary Concepts, and Publication Types. Use the Contact Us form for these reports.

NLM Announces Important Dates for MEDLINE/PubMed 2017 Year-End Processing Activities

The National Library of Medicine is currently involved in MEDLINE year-end processing (YEP) activities. These include changing the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) main headings and subheadings as well as Supplementary Concept Records that standardize names and associated numbers for chemicals, protocols, and diseases that are not main headings. The MeSH edits include maintaining existing MEDLINE citations to conform with the 2017 version of MeSH, and other global changes.

Important Dates

  • November 15, 2016: NLM expects to temporarily suspend the addition of fully-indexed MEDLINE citations to PubMed. NLM will continue to add Publisher-supplied and in process citations.
  • Mid-December 2016: PubMed MEDLINE citations, translation tables, and the MeSH database will have been updated to reflect 2017 MeSH.

For details about the impact on searching from November 16 to mid-December, visit Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Impact on Searching During Fall 2016. For background information on the general kinds of changes made annually, visit Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Background Information.

NLM Policy Change for Identification of Partial Retractions in MEDLINE/PubMed

The National Library of Medicine began keeping separate statistics on partial retractions in December 2006 and reporting them on the MEDLINE Key Indicators page when a journal identified an article as partially retracted. In 2006, NLM expected that partial retractions would be a new designation that publishers would be using. These were cases when some aspect of the article, such as a table, chart, image, etc., was determined to be incorrect, but the overall methodology or conclusion(s) of the paper were not affected. Since 2006, only 42 articles have been designated as “partially retracted.” In addition, the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Retraction Guidelines state that partial retractions make it difficult for users to know which parts of an article are or are not reliable or the correct status of the article.

Beginning in October 2016, NLM will discontinue the identification of partial retractions in MEDLINE/PubMed. Previously, the Retracted Publication designation was added as a Publication Type to the citation for the article, which also triggered the Retracted Article banner on the Abstract display in PubMed, and Retraction of Publication was used as the Publication Type for the notice citation. NLM also linked the citations using a “Partial retraction in” label on the article citation and a “Partial retraction of” label on the notice citation. Instead, this type of notice will be treated as a published erratum. NLM will no longer use the retraction-related Publication Types on these citations, and the Retracted Article banner will no longer appear on the Abstract display; the notice citation will have Published Erratum as the Publication Type. The citations will continue to be linked, but will use an “Erratum in” label on the article citation and an “Erratum for” label on the notice citation, as is the case for other errata/correction notices. NLM has edited the existing 42 pairs of citations to reflect the new policy and the “Errata” Fact Sheet has been edited to reflect the new policy.

Videocast on October 4: Louis W. Sullivan, MD, Former US Secretary of Health and Human Services

Louis W. Sullivan, MD, US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1989–1993), gave a 90-minute presentation about his life story, and racial disparities and medical care on October 4, A Personal Perspective on Race, Opportunity and the US Health System, which was archived for future viewing. Dr. Sullivan grew up in rural Georgia during the period of legally-sanctioned and enforced racial segregation, which impacted him, his family, and the black community. He was inspired to become a physician when, at age 5, he met the only black physician in Southwest Georgia. After becoming a hematologist and professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, he went on to found the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, followed by an appointment as US Secretary of Health and Human Services in the administration of George H.W. Bush.

Dr. Sullivan developed initiatives to increase racial, ethnic, and gender diversity in the US Department of Health and Human Services and in the nation’s health workforce. Throughout his career, he has worked to improve the effectiveness of the US health system and the diversity of its workforce. The elimination of disparities in health care, which exist between whites and the nation’s underserved minorities, is an ongoing priority of Dr. Sullivan. He’ll discuss progress to date and remaining challenges.

New Webinar Series: Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data

On Wednesday, October 19, 11:00am – 12:00pm PDT, NLM will host the first session of a new Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data series of webinars, beginning with Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed. The webinar series will promote more powerful and flexible ways of accessing NLM data, starting with an introduction to the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for PubMed and other NCBI databases. The series is geared toward librarians and other information specialists who have experience using PubMed via the traditional Web interface, but now want to dig deeper. This class will start with the very basics of APIs, and then move on to showing how to get started using the E-utilities API to search and retrieve records from PubMed. The class will also showcase some specific tools and utilities that information specialists can use to work with E-utilities, helping to prepare for subsequent Insider’s Guide classes. The session will conclude by looking at some practical examples of E-utilities in the real world, and hopefully inspire you to get out and put these lessons to use!

Retention of Ceased Abstracting and Indexing Publications Containing MEDLINE Citations

Does your collection include abstracting and indexing titles produced in cooperation with NLM, such as Hospital Literature Index and/or its successor Hospital and Health Administration Index, Index to Dental Literature, or International Nursing Index, all of which had ceased publication by the year 2000? In general, the NLM-derived citations in these publications are available in MEDLINE/PubMed. However, all of these publications also contained separate sections for monographic materials, which may not be available in the NLM collection. Therefore, NLM advises librarians that if access to the monographic materials in these tools are important at your institution, then retain these old print indexes in your collection. More details about each publication are available in this FAQ.

Find, Browse and Follow Biomedical Literature with NCBI’s New PubMed Journals Resource

Following the latest biomedical literature can be a challenge, but NCBI’s new PubMed Journals resource will help you keep up-to-date.

Use PubMed Journals to:

  • Easily find and follow journals of interest.
  • Browse new articles in your favorite journal(s).
  • Keep up-to-date with a Journal News Feed containing new arrivals, news links, trending articles, and important article updates (retractions and more!).

To follow a journal, you’ll need to be logged in to your NCBI account. PubMed Journals is an experiment of PubMed Labs, NCBI’s  product incubator for delivering new features and capabilities to NCBI end users.