Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About PSR | Contact PSR | Feedback | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

NLM to Hold First Annual Michael E. DeBakey Lecture in the History of Medicine on March 21

The National Library of Medicine has announced the first annual Michael E. DeBakey Lecture in the History of Medicine, a program made possible by a generous gift to the NLM by the Michael E. DeBakey Medical Foundation. The program took place on March 21, and was archived for future viewing. Speakers included:

  • Shelley McKellar, PhD, The Jason A. Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine, Associate Professor with Joint Appointment with the Department of Surgery, Western University, Canada, offered the presentation: Intentional Impact:” The Legacy of Michael E. DeBakey Beyond the Operating Room
  • George P. Noon, MD, Professor of Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, presented A Brief Look at Michael E. DeBakey’s Role in Establishing the National Library of Medicine as It Is Today

Michael E. DeBakey (1908-2008) was a legendary American surgeon, educator, medical statesman, and one of most stalwart supporters of the National Library of Medicine. During a career spanning 75 years, his work transformed cardiovascular surgery, raised medical education standards, and informed national health care policy. He pioneered dozens of operative procedures such as aneurysm repair, coronary bypass, and endarterectomy, which routinely save thousands of lives each year, and performed some of the first heart transplants. His inventions included the roller pump (a key component of heart-lung machines) as well as artificial hearts and ventricular assist pumps. He was a driving force in building Houston’s Baylor University College of Medicine into a premier medical center, where he trained several generations of top surgeons from all over the world. Dr. DeBakey played a pivotal role in the creation of the National Library of Medicine in the 1950s, and in the establishment of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in the 1960s. As a visionary member and chair of the NLM Board of Regents and several other NLM advisory panels, DeBakey made countless contributions to the Library which live on today.

This program is part of the NLM History of Medicine Division’s 2017 lecture series. Learn more about Dr. DeBakey, his work, and his accomplishments at NLM’s Profiles in Science Web site and in this post on the NLM History of Medicine Division’s blog, Circulating Now.

Training Event in Yakima, WA: Disaster Preparedness for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations within the Community Infrastructure

Register by March 31 to attend the free two-day training event Disaster Preparedness for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations within the Community Infrastructure April 4-5 at Yakima Valley Community College in eastern Washington. This course will focus on preparedness processes and activities and provides hospitals and healthcare personnel an opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to help them ensure the sustainability of their facilities and organizations during all types of disasters. The session is hosted in conjunction with DHS/FEMA National Training Program, Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX), Texas A&M University System and the National Emergency Response and Rescue Training Center (NERRTC). Limited seating is available. Morning refreshments and lunch will be provided for attendees.

Resources for Locating Health Data, Statistics, and Data Visualization Tools

Health professionals often need to locate health statistics and data and to visualize that data in chart, graph, or map format. The following resources related to health data, statistics, and data visualization tools may be useful:

  • NLM’s MedlinePlus: The Health Statistics page provides a summary of health statistics and  links to a wide variety of reliable health statistics resources.
  • 2010 Census Data: The most detailed information available from the 2010 Census about a community’s entire population, including cross-tabulations of age, sex, households, families, relationship to householder, housing units, detailed race and Hispanic or Latino origin groups, and group quarters.
  • Healthdata.gov: Comprehensive catalog of health-related data sets relevant to all aspects of health, for a broad array of users, supplied by a wide range of federal agencies, and available for free.
  • CDC Data Resources: Reference list of nationally funded data systems with a relationship to environmental public health; highlights the major data systems with a national scope where public health and environmental data can be directly downloaded.
  • Visualize Toxic Chemical Data: Use NLM’s TOXMAP to visualize locations of US EPA Toxics Release Inventory facilities, US Superfund sites, Environment Canada’s National Pollutant Release Inventory sites, US nuclear plants, and EPA coal plants. Additional layers of US census and health data can be added to the map.
  • Learn How to Create Maps with Low/No Cost Tools: Use NLM’s Community Health Maps to learn about free and low cost methods for collecting field data, combining field data with other organizational data, and visualizing the data through online mapping tools.

Use NLM’s AIDSource Portal to Locate HIV/AIDS Information for Many Specific Population Groups!

AIDSource is a portal to HIV/AIDS-related resources, reviewed and selected by expert information specialists from the National Library of Medicine. Users can easily locate HIV/AIDS resources for special populations under the Specific Populations section of AIDSource, including:

Users can also choose the “Select Audience” menu on AIDSource to view lists of HIV/AIDS resources for specific audiences, such as the general public, health professionals, multilingual speakers, researchers/scientists, Spanish speakers, or students/educators.

NLM Announces Addition of CDC’s Vaccines Administered Data to RxNorm Terminology

The National Library of Medicine has announced the addition of CVX (Vaccines Administered) as a new data source to RxNorm. The addition of CVX data to RxNorm helps facilitate the electronic exchange of vaccine information in electronic health records. CVX includes both active and inactive vaccines available in the United States. CVX codes for inactive vaccines allow electronic transmission of historical immunization records. CVX is maintained and developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center of Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).

March 2017 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of mom reading ingredients on a jar of food while baby waits in high chair

Check out the March issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Find Help for Low Vision
    Millions of Americans have low vision caused by an eye injury or a disease such as glaucoma. The sooner an eye problem is detected and treated by a physician, the greater your chance of keeping your remaining vision.
  • Featured Website: Bone Health Resources
    How do you keep your bones healthy and strong? It’s never too late to improve your bone health. Find out how to eat the right foods, exercise safely, and make other healthy lifestyle choices to protect your bones.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

NIH Open Science Grand Prize Winner Announced!

A prototype online platform that uses real-time visualization and viral genome data to track the spread of global pathogens such as Zika and Ebola is the grand prize winner of the Open Science Prize. The international team competition is an initiative of the National Institutes of Health, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). The winning team, Real-time Evolutionary Tracking for Pathogen Surveillance and Epidemiological Investigation, created its nextstrain.org prototype to pool data from researchers across the globe, perform rapid phylogenetic analysis, and post the results on the platform’s website. The winning team will receive $230,000 to fully develop their prototype with NIH awarding $115,000 to the U.S. members of the winning team, and the Wellcome Trust and HHMI also contributing $115,000.

The Open Science Prize is a global competition designed to foster innovative solutions in public health and biomedicine using open digital content. The prize, which was launched in October 2015, aims to forge new international collaborations that bring together open science innovators to develop services and tools of benefit to the global research community. All six finalist teams were considered exemplary by the funders and are to be commended for their tenacity in developing creative approaches to applying publicly-accessible data to solve complex biomedical and public health challenges. The topics spanned the breadth of biomedical and public challenges, ranging from understanding the genetic basis of rare diseases, mapping the human brain, and enhancing the sharing of clinical trial information. As evidenced from the six Open Science Prize finalists, public health and biomedical solutions are enriched when data are combined from geographically diverse sources. Further details are available in the NIH Press Release.

Resources for Finding and Visualizing Health Data and Statistics

Health outreach professionals often need to locate health statistics and data, to learn what kinds of health issues affect specific populations. The data may need to be visualized in chart, graph, or map format, to include in reports for policy makers and for the general public. Where can you find the raw data related to public health, and what tools are available to visualize the data? Following are a few resources related to health data, statistics, and data visualization that may be useful:

  • Learn about Health Statistics on MedlinePlus: Your first stop can be the Health Statistics page on MedlinePlus, where you can read a quick summary about health statistics and access links to a wide variety of reliable health statistics resources.
  • Find Public Datasets Related to Health Disparities: The Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently announced the release of the National Partnership for Action (NPA) Compendium of Publicly Available Datasets and Other Data-Related Resources, a free resource that compiles descriptions of and links to 132 public datasets and resources that include information about health conditions and other factors that impact the health of minority populations.
  • Visualize Toxic Chemical Health Data on TOXMAP: The TOXMAP tool can be used to visualize locations of Toxic Release Inventory facilities, Superfund sites, Environment Canada’s National Pollutant Release Inventory data, location of nuclear plants, and location of EPA coal plants, with additional layers of US census and health data added to the map to illustrate environmental health disparities in specific locations.
  • Learn How to Create Community Health Maps: Use the Community Health Mapping Lab Exercises to learn free and low cost methods for collecting field data, combining field data with other organizational data, and visualizing the data through online mapping tools.

What’s New on NLM’s Radiation Emergency Medical Management (REMM) Resource

Since the last REMM update in August, 2016, the following important US government document have been incorporated into the resource. Additional information is available by visiting What’s New on REMM?

An update to Mobile REMM is also coming soon!

National Library of Medicine’s TOXMAP Resource Now Includes TRI 2015 Data

NLM’s TOXMAP now includes 2015 Toxics Release Inventory data. This corresponds to the most recent TRI National Analysis published by the US EPA. TOXMAP maps the TRI chemicals reported to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as required by the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA). A complete list of TRI chemicals required to be reported to the EPA is available on the website.