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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

AIDSinfo Website Gets an Update and Redesign!

The AIDSinfo website was updated on April 15th and includes a new design and an improved look and feel. Major enhancements include:

  •  Reorganization of patient education materials: all patient education materials are now located in a new Understanding HIV/AIDS section of the website. AIDSinfo patient education materials include fact sheets, infographics, an HIV/AIDS glossary, and webpages highlighting the National HIV/AIDS Awareness Days.
  • Increased prominence of apps: the AIDSinfo HIV/AIDS Guidelines, Drug Database, and Glossary apps are now prominently featured in each section of the website.
  • Enhanced search functionality: an updated search feature allows users to quickly find relevant resources.
  • Increased linking between AIDSinfo resources: AIDSinfo resources are now linked to each other across the website. For example, patient fact sheets are now linked directly from the guidelines pages, so health care providers can easily access materials for their patients.

Online Interactive Health Literacy Training Available!

Both the general public and health information professionals should be familiar with the important topic of health literacy. According to MedlinePlus, health literacy is defined as “how well a person can get the health information and services that they need, and how well they understand them.” A number of interactive online trainings are available for the general public to help everyone improve their own health literacy. Online trainings are also available for public health professionals to help them improve their ability to teach health literacy to the general public. Here’s a quick overview of a few online trainings available from government websites:

Events for April 2017 National Minority Health Month!

April is National Minority Health Month, and the 2017 theme is Bridging Health Equity Across Communities, which emphasizes the collaborative, community-level work being done across the nation to help achieve health equity. The U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) offers a number of events and promotional materials to celebrate National Minority Health Month 2017, including:

  • #Bridge2Health Twitter Town Hall at 10:00 AM PDT on April 12 will highlight examples from around the country of community-based efforts to address health disparities.
  • Other events include the NIMHD Twitter Chat on April 25 from 11:00am-12:00pm PDT and the HHS OMH Health Equity Thunderclap on April 28 at 10:00 AM PDT.
  • Twitter and Facebook posts to share.
  • Graphics to share on websites or through social media.

RxNorm Completes the Prescribable Name (PSN) Project

The National Library of Medicine has announced that the April 2017 RxNorm monthly release contains a Prescribable Name (PSN) for all RxNorm normal forms for active human drugs sold in the United States (US) with a few exceptions. Drugs without a PSN include allergenic extracts and certain forms containing three or more ingredients. PSNs are user-friendly synonyms of RxNorm normalized drug names and are meant to be used as display names in e-prescribing systems. Unlike other RxNorm synonyms, there can only be a single PSN associated with an RxNorm concept (i.e., RxNorm Concept Unique Identifier or RXCUI). RxNorm editors create PSNs based upon the drug label on DailyMed. PSNs may contain common ingredient abbreviations and tall man lettering, and their strengths may not be normalized as they are in the RxNorm normalized names.

PSNs were first introduced in the July 2014 release of RxNorm. NLM would like to thank the US Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration (VHA) for help with funding this project, and the National Council for Prescription Drug Programs (NCPDP) for help with organizing content discussions with stakeholders. The addition of PSNs to RxNorm is a major step towards improving the efficiency and accuracy of drug information management in e-prescribing systems.

April 2017 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of senior rubbing aching hand joints while cooking.

Check out the April issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Reducing Underage Drinking Among American Indians
    American Indian teens have higher rates of alcohol use before age 15 than other U.S. teens. They also have higher rates of alcohol problems. But ways to prevent alcohol use in these groups haven’t been studied well.
  • How Cancer Cells Spread in the Body
    During metastasis, cancer cells spread from the place in the body where they first formed to other parts of the body. Read this interesting article to learn more about how cancer spreads.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

New NIH Resource Launched: Language Access Portal!

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) has just launched the Language Access Portal (LAP). This resource provides access to reliable cross-cultural and linguistically appropriate health information from NIH and other federal agencies, for tools to help communication with populations with limited English proficiency. NIMHD is committed to supporting research and communications efforts to improve cultural competency and health literacy.

Save the Date for “Consequential and Reproducible Clinical Research: Charting the Course for Continuous Improvement” Conference at NLM June 14-15

Registration is available for the 2017 Annual Conference of the Friends of the National Library of Medicine, Consequential and Reproducible Clinical Research: Charting the Course for Continuous Improvement, to be held June 14-15 at NLM’s Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications Building. The conference will discuss prevention of non-repeatable research and inconsequential studies, highlight positive strategies to achieve trustworthy results and significant quality improvement in clinical research studies. The constructive and practical messages should benefit producers as well as users of clinical research discoveries. The meeting is co-sponsored by the National Library of Medicine and Research!America. The early-bird discount registration deadline is April 30. Additional information will be provided soon for recommended travel, accommodations, and the conference program.

NLM Resources for National Native American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day: March 20, 2017

Today is National Native American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Health outreach professionals can access HIV/AIDS resources for Native American communities through multiple National Library of Medicine websites, including the following:

  • American Indian Health – Check the “Health Topics – HIV/AIDS” section of American Indian Health for links to HIV/AIDS resources for Native American individuals and communities, for researchers/health professionals/educators, programs and organizations working to treat and prevent HIV/AIDS among Native Americans, and health information about HIV/AIDS for everyone.
  • AIDSource – Look under the Specific Populations:Native Americans section of AIDSource for HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, education, and research resources related to HIV/AIDS in Native American communities.
  • PubMed – For the latest biomedical research related to HIV/AIDS among Native American populations, visit PubMed.

NLM Mourns the Loss of Faye G. Abdellah, former Deputy Surgeon General and NLM Board of Regents member

Deputy Surgeon General Faye G. Abdellah, RN, MA, EdD, died on February 24, 2017, at the age of 97. Dr. Abdellah was a nurse, educator, and deputy surgeon general of the Public Health Service. She served as the U.S Surgeon General’s alternate ex-officio member of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine from 1972-1989. Her accomplishments include being the first nurse and woman to serve as Deputy Surgeon General of the United States (1981-1989), the highest ranked woman and nurse in the Federal Nursing Services when she achieved the rank of Rear Admiral, and the founder and first dean of the Graduate School of Nursing at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences.

As possibly the longest serving member of the NLM Board of Regents, Dr. Abdellah gave presentations that updated board members on many public health issues, including smoking, pediatric AIDS, and drunk driving. She contributed to Board policies that shaped NLM programs and services and to the NLM Long-Range Plan for 1986-2006. Dr. Abdellah was recognized internationally for her contributions to nursing research. She was known for creating a typology of 21 areas of focus for nurses, divided into three classes: physical, sociological and emotional needs of the patient; types of nurse-patient interpersonal relationships; and common elements of patient care. She advocated for nursing education to be research based, for nurses teaching self-care to patients, and an interdisciplinary approach to care.

Dr. Abdellah was adamant about the need for education based on science very early in her career. When she first taught nursing students at Yale University, she was so frustrated with the National League of Nursing guidelines because they had no scientific basis that she burned a stack of their curriculum guides in the Yale Courtyard. She told the Journal of Nursing Scholarship that it took her a year to pay for the books she burned. An obituary for Dr. Abdellah has been published.

Health Conditions Among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Adults

In 2014, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) conducted the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander National Health Interview Survey (NHPI NHIS). The survey involved about 3,000 households containing one or more NHPI residents who were surveyed by NHIS field staff using the 2014 NHIS instrument. The NHPI NHIS was an unprecedented opportunity to collect rich and accurate information from a large NHPI sample about the health of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in all 50 states. In March, 2017, the NCHS released the Data Brief on the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander National Health Interview Survey (NHPI NHIS). Key findings include:

  • The age-sex-adjusted percentages of NHPI adults with fair or poor health (15.5%), serious psychological distress (4.1% in past 30 days), cancer (5.7%), coronary heart disease (6.0%), diabetes (15.6%), lower back pain (28.5% in past 3 months), arthritis (19.7%), migraines (14.1% in past 3 months), and asthma (9.9%) were  greater than the corresponding percentages for single-race Asian adults.
  • NHPI adults were more likely than all U.S. adults to be in fair or poor health, to have diabetes, and to have ever had asthma, but they were less likely to have cancer.

Galinsky AM, Zelaya CE, Barnes PM, Simile C. Selected Health Conditions Among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Adults: United States 2014NCHS Data Brief 277 March, 2017.

Thanks to Sela V. Panapasa, PhD, from the University of Michigan, for alerting us.