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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

New NIH Resource Launched: Language Access Portal!

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) has just launched the Language Access Portal (LAP). This resource provides access to reliable cross-cultural and linguistically appropriate health information from NIH and other federal agencies, for tools to help communication with populations with limited English proficiency. NIMHD is committed to supporting research and communications efforts to improve cultural competency and health literacy.

Save the Date for “Consequential and Reproducible Clinical Research: Charting the Course for Continuous Improvement” Conference at NLM June 14-15

Registration is available for the 2017 Annual Conference of the Friends of the National Library of Medicine, Consequential and Reproducible Clinical Research: Charting the Course for Continuous Improvement, to be held June 14-15 at NLM’s Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications Building. The conference will discuss prevention of non-repeatable research and inconsequential studies, highlight positive strategies to achieve trustworthy results and significant quality improvement in clinical research studies. The constructive and practical messages should benefit producers as well as users of clinical research discoveries. The meeting is co-sponsored by the National Library of Medicine and Research!America. The early-bird discount registration deadline is April 30. Additional information will be provided soon for recommended travel, accommodations, and the conference program.

NLM Resources for National Native American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day: March 20, 2017

Today is National Native American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Health outreach professionals can access HIV/AIDS resources for Native American communities through multiple National Library of Medicine websites, including the following:

  • American Indian Health – Check the “Health Topics – HIV/AIDS” section of American Indian Health for links to HIV/AIDS resources for Native American individuals and communities, for researchers/health professionals/educators, programs and organizations working to treat and prevent HIV/AIDS among Native Americans, and health information about HIV/AIDS for everyone.
  • AIDSource – Look under the Specific Populations:Native Americans section of AIDSource for HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, education, and research resources related to HIV/AIDS in Native American communities.
  • PubMed – For the latest biomedical research related to HIV/AIDS among Native American populations, visit PubMed.

NLM Mourns the Loss of Faye G. Abdellah, former Deputy Surgeon General and NLM Board of Regents member

Deputy Surgeon General Faye G. Abdellah, RN, MA, EdD, died on February 24, 2017, at the age of 97. Dr. Abdellah was a nurse, educator, and deputy surgeon general of the Public Health Service. She served as the U.S Surgeon General’s alternate ex-officio member of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine from 1972-1989. Her accomplishments include being the first nurse and woman to serve as Deputy Surgeon General of the United States (1981-1989), the highest ranked woman and nurse in the Federal Nursing Services when she achieved the rank of Rear Admiral, and the founder and first dean of the Graduate School of Nursing at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences.

As possibly the longest serving member of the NLM Board of Regents, Dr. Abdellah gave presentations that updated board members on many public health issues, including smoking, pediatric AIDS, and drunk driving. She contributed to Board policies that shaped NLM programs and services and to the NLM Long-Range Plan for 1986-2006. Dr. Abdellah was recognized internationally for her contributions to nursing research. She was known for creating a typology of 21 areas of focus for nurses, divided into three classes: physical, sociological and emotional needs of the patient; types of nurse-patient interpersonal relationships; and common elements of patient care. She advocated for nursing education to be research based, for nurses teaching self-care to patients, and an interdisciplinary approach to care.

Dr. Abdellah was adamant about the need for education based on science very early in her career. When she first taught nursing students at Yale University, she was so frustrated with the National League of Nursing guidelines because they had no scientific basis that she burned a stack of their curriculum guides in the Yale Courtyard. She told the Journal of Nursing Scholarship that it took her a year to pay for the books she burned. An obituary for Dr. Abdellah has been published.

Health Conditions Among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Adults

In 2014, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) conducted the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander National Health Interview Survey (NHPI NHIS). The survey involved about 3,000 households containing one or more NHPI residents who were surveyed by NHIS field staff using the 2014 NHIS instrument. The NHPI NHIS was an unprecedented opportunity to collect rich and accurate information from a large NHPI sample about the health of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in all 50 states. In March, 2017, the NCHS released the Data Brief on the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander National Health Interview Survey (NHPI NHIS). Key findings include:

  • The age-sex-adjusted percentages of NHPI adults with fair or poor health (15.5%), serious psychological distress (4.1% in past 30 days), cancer (5.7%), coronary heart disease (6.0%), diabetes (15.6%), lower back pain (28.5% in past 3 months), arthritis (19.7%), migraines (14.1% in past 3 months), and asthma (9.9%) were  greater than the corresponding percentages for single-race Asian adults.
  • NHPI adults were more likely than all U.S. adults to be in fair or poor health, to have diabetes, and to have ever had asthma, but they were less likely to have cancer.

Galinsky AM, Zelaya CE, Barnes PM, Simile C. Selected Health Conditions Among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Adults: United States 2014NCHS Data Brief 277 March, 2017.

Thanks to Sela V. Panapasa, PhD, from the University of Michigan, for alerting us.

NLM to Hold First Annual Michael E. DeBakey Lecture in the History of Medicine on March 21

The National Library of Medicine has announced the first annual Michael E. DeBakey Lecture in the History of Medicine, a program made possible by a generous gift to the NLM by the Michael E. DeBakey Medical Foundation. The program took place on March 21, and was archived for future viewing. Speakers included:

  • Shelley McKellar, PhD, The Jason A. Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine, Associate Professor with Joint Appointment with the Department of Surgery, Western University, Canada, offered the presentation: Intentional Impact:” The Legacy of Michael E. DeBakey Beyond the Operating Room
  • George P. Noon, MD, Professor of Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, presented A Brief Look at Michael E. DeBakey’s Role in Establishing the National Library of Medicine as It Is Today

Michael E. DeBakey (1908-2008) was a legendary American surgeon, educator, medical statesman, and one of most stalwart supporters of the National Library of Medicine. During a career spanning 75 years, his work transformed cardiovascular surgery, raised medical education standards, and informed national health care policy. He pioneered dozens of operative procedures such as aneurysm repair, coronary bypass, and endarterectomy, which routinely save thousands of lives each year, and performed some of the first heart transplants. His inventions included the roller pump (a key component of heart-lung machines) as well as artificial hearts and ventricular assist pumps. He was a driving force in building Houston’s Baylor University College of Medicine into a premier medical center, where he trained several generations of top surgeons from all over the world. Dr. DeBakey played a pivotal role in the creation of the National Library of Medicine in the 1950s, and in the establishment of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in the 1960s. As a visionary member and chair of the NLM Board of Regents and several other NLM advisory panels, DeBakey made countless contributions to the Library which live on today.

This program is part of the NLM History of Medicine Division’s 2017 lecture series. Learn more about Dr. DeBakey, his work, and his accomplishments at NLM’s Profiles in Science Web site and in this post on the NLM History of Medicine Division’s blog, Circulating Now.

Training Event in Yakima, WA: Disaster Preparedness for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations within the Community Infrastructure

Register by March 31 to attend the free two-day training event Disaster Preparedness for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations within the Community Infrastructure April 4-5 at Yakima Valley Community College in eastern Washington. This course will focus on preparedness processes and activities and provides hospitals and healthcare personnel an opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to help them ensure the sustainability of their facilities and organizations during all types of disasters. The session is hosted in conjunction with DHS/FEMA National Training Program, Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX), Texas A&M University System and the National Emergency Response and Rescue Training Center (NERRTC). Limited seating is available. Morning refreshments and lunch will be provided for attendees.

Resources for Locating Health Data, Statistics, and Data Visualization Tools

Health professionals often need to locate health statistics and data and to visualize that data in chart, graph, or map format. The following resources related to health data, statistics, and data visualization tools may be useful:

  • NLM’s MedlinePlus: The Health Statistics page provides a summary of health statistics and  links to a wide variety of reliable health statistics resources.
  • 2010 Census Data: The most detailed information available from the 2010 Census about a community’s entire population, including cross-tabulations of age, sex, households, families, relationship to householder, housing units, detailed race and Hispanic or Latino origin groups, and group quarters.
  • Healthdata.gov: Comprehensive catalog of health-related data sets relevant to all aspects of health, for a broad array of users, supplied by a wide range of federal agencies, and available for free.
  • CDC Data Resources: Reference list of nationally funded data systems with a relationship to environmental public health; highlights the major data systems with a national scope where public health and environmental data can be directly downloaded.
  • Visualize Toxic Chemical Data: Use NLM’s TOXMAP to visualize locations of US EPA Toxics Release Inventory facilities, US Superfund sites, Environment Canada’s National Pollutant Release Inventory sites, US nuclear plants, and EPA coal plants. Additional layers of US census and health data can be added to the map.
  • Learn How to Create Maps with Low/No Cost Tools: Use NLM’s Community Health Maps to learn about free and low cost methods for collecting field data, combining field data with other organizational data, and visualizing the data through online mapping tools.

Use NLM’s AIDSource Portal to Locate HIV/AIDS Information for Many Specific Population Groups!

AIDSource is a portal to HIV/AIDS-related resources, reviewed and selected by expert information specialists from the National Library of Medicine. Users can easily locate HIV/AIDS resources for special populations under the Specific Populations section of AIDSource, including:

Users can also choose the “Select Audience” menu on AIDSource to view lists of HIV/AIDS resources for specific audiences, such as the general public, health professionals, multilingual speakers, researchers/scientists, Spanish speakers, or students/educators.

NLM Announces Addition of CDC’s Vaccines Administered Data to RxNorm Terminology

The National Library of Medicine has announced the addition of CVX (Vaccines Administered) as a new data source to RxNorm. The addition of CVX data to RxNorm helps facilitate the electronic exchange of vaccine information in electronic health records. CVX includes both active and inactive vaccines available in the United States. CVX codes for inactive vaccines allow electronic transmission of historical immunization records. CVX is maintained and developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center of Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).