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Archive for the ‘Non-NLM Resources’ Category

Newly Redesigned Think Cultural Health Website Released!

The Office of Minority Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced the launch of the newly redesigned Think Cultural Health website. It now includes designs that feature a simpler layout and brighter colors, and its responsive design means it can be accessed anytime from your cell phone, tablet, laptop, or desktop computer. The new design makes it easier for anyone to browse the latest resources and find information that will help individuals and organizations deliver respectful, understandable, and effective services to all. The following resources are included:

  • The National CLAS Standards section features an explanation of CLAS, a printable list of the Standards, the comprehensive technical assistance document called The Blueprint, and more.
  • The Education section features e-learning programs designed for disaster personnel, nurses, oral health professionals, physicians, community health workers, and more.
  • The Resources section features a searchable library of over 500 online resources, recorded presentations, educational video units on CLAS, and more.

Visit the Think Cultural Health website today and let the Office of Minority Health know what you think!

September is National Preparedness Month

The theme for 2016 National Preparedness Month is Don’t Wait, Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today. Ready.gov and CDC suggest weekly themes as reminders to take different types of action toward preparedness. NLM Disaster Health has paired some of its best preparedness resources with the weekly themes:

Week 2: Preparing Family & Friends
The Community and Personal Preparedness page is relevant throughout the month and year. Don’t forget your furry, feathered, and scaly friends when you prepare. Meanwhile, this week the CDC focuses on the critical role of Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs).

Week 3: Preparing Through Service
This week, focus on serving your larger community. Think about what your community can do to help prepare the very young, the very old, the disabled, and others with special needs. Meanwhile, the CDC suggests we learn more about what state and local health departments can do to be prepared.

Week 4: Individual Preparedness
Ready.gov suggests downloading disaster apps to your mobile devices. This would be a good week to check out the list of Disaster Apps for Your Digital Go Bag. The CDC proposes studying what resilient communities have in common.

Week 5: Lead up to America’s PrepareAthon
As National Preparedness Month draws to a close, Ready.gov suggests you “be counted and register your preparedness event.” Consider listening to an archived NLM Disaster Health webinar in which librarians and other information specialists discuss their roles in the disaster life cycle. The CDC reminds us this week to prepare ourselves; just in time for America’s PrepareAthon on Friday, September 30!

Celebrate Go4Life Month in September!

The National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health, has a variety of free materials to help seniors become and stay physically active, including sample exercises, an exercise guide book, easy-to-print tip sheets with information about the health benefits of physical activity, and even tools for setting goals and tracking progress. The information in these resources is based on research in people ages 50+. The NIH Go4Life exercise and physical activity campaign provides strategies to encourage seniors about ways to incorporate exercise into their daily lives. Seniors can also get activity ideas and sign up to receive free e-mail exercise tips and weekly motivation from Go4Life virtual coaches. Also, join the celebration of Go4Life Month during September. This year’s theme is #Fit4Function, focusing on the practical benefits of exercise and physical activity, like being able to drive, carry groceries into the house, do yardwork, and walk the dog; all of which are important activities to older adults!

Redesigned National Guideline Clearinghouse Coming Soon!

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is redesigning the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) Web site for release this summer! Responsive Web Design (RWD) techniques will provide a better viewing experience across a wide range of devices, from desktop and laptop computers, to tablets and mobile phones. In addition to the new design, NGC will feature updated searching capabilities by using filters and facets for refining your search results, and updated browsing capabilities for the Browse by Topic and Browse by Organization pages.

The redesigned NGC Web site will be more intuitive, with an improved, new look and feel, but will maintain the same great content that has defined NGC for many years. For more information and to preview screen shots of the changes, visit Notice to Our Users – Redesigned National Guideline Clearinghouse.

NAS Food Literacy Workshop Summary Available

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board recently published the workshop summary from Food Literacy: How Do Communications and Marketing Impact Consumer Knowledge, Skills, and Behavior? This workshop from September, 2015, discussed various aspects of food literacy including:

  • the role of consumer education, communication, and health literacy with respect to food safety, nutrition, and other health matters;
  • how scientific information is communicated; and
  • how food literacy can be strengthened through communication tools and strategies.

SPARC and Johns Hopkins University Libraries Launch New Resource Analyzing Federal Data Sharing Policies

The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Libraries, has released a new resource for tracking, comparing, and understanding U.S. federal funder research data sharing policies. This freely available tool provides a detailed analysis of 16 federal agency responses to the directive issued by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research. Specifically, the new resource focuses on how these agencies intend to make the digital data associated with the projects they fund available for access and reuse.

The SPARC/JHU Libraries resource can be used by researchers, librarians, policy makers, and other stakeholders to explore and compare agency plans. The detailed review, performed by JHU data experts, includes an analysis of the principles, scope, and limitations of agency responses to the OSTP directive, as well as a discussion of any goals and plans the agencies have articulated for future iterations of their policies. The resource contains practical information that can be used by active or prospective grant awardees to easily understand where research data can be shared, how quickly, and what other procedures must be followed to ensure grant compliance. It will be updated as additional federal agency plans are released and analyzed, and as current plans are revised. The entire dataset of policy analyses can be downloaded without restriction from the site.

Healthy People 2030 Advisory Committee Seeks Nominations: Apply by April 18!

The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) is seeking membership nominations for the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2030. They are looking for a diverse group of nationally known experts in fields related to disease prevention and health promotion to help develop the vision, framework, and structure of Healthy People 2030. Nominations must be submitted by April 18. For more information on the nomination process, visit the Federal Register notice.

Applying Cultural Competence to Outreach Evaluation

The American Evaluation Association’s Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation describes the importance of cultural competence in terms of ethics, validity of results, and theory.

  • Ethics – quality evaluation has an ethical responsibility to ensure fair, just and equitable treatment of all persons.
  • Validity – evaluation results that are considered valid require trust from the diverse perspectives of the people providing the data and trust that the data will be honestly and fairly represented.
  • Theory – theories underlie all of evaluation, but theories are not created in a cultural vacuum. Assumptions behind theories must be carefully examined to ensure that they apply in the cultural context of the evaluation.

The Statement also makes some recommendations for essential practices for cultural competence, including the following examples:

  • Acknowledge the complexity of cultural identity. Cultural groups are not static, and people belong to multiple cultural groups. Attempts to categorize people often collapse them into cultural groupings that may not accurately represent the true diversity that exists.
  • Recognize the dynamics of power. Cultural privilege can create and perpetuate inequities in power. Work to avoid reinforcing cultural stereotypes and prejudice in evaluation. Evaluators often work with data organized by cultural categories. The choices you make in working with these data can affect prejudice and discrimination attached to such categories.
  • Recognize and eliminate bias in language: Language is often used as the code for a certain treatment of groups. Thoughtful use of language can reduce bias when conducting evaluations.

Two recent entries on the Evergreen Blog on data visualizations and how they can show cultural bias illustrate how these principles can be applied to the evaluation of an outreach project. The first case, How Dataviz Can Unintentionally Perpetuate Inequality: The Bleeding Infestation Example, shows how using red to represent individual participants on a map made the actual participants feel like they were perceived as a threat. The more recent blog post, How Dataviz Can Unintentionally Perpetuate Inequality Part 2, shows how the categories used in a chart on median household income contribute to stereotyping certain cultures and skew the data to show something that does not accurately represent income levels of the different groups.

WHO Launches the Zika App for Health Care Providers

The World Health Organization has created a Zika app that gathers all of WHO’s guidance for agencies and individuals involved in the response to Zika Virus Disease and its suspected complications such as microcephaly, and for health care workers such as doctors, nurses and community health workers. The English version of the app is now available both in Android and iOS versions. It will be soon be available in all United Nations’ official languages and Portuguese!

HCUP Nationwide Databases Now Available for Download!

The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) is a family of health care databases and related software tools and products developed through a Federal-State-Industry partnership and sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). These databases enable research on a broad range of health policy issues, including cost and quality of health services, medical practice patterns, access to health care programs, and outcomes of treatments at the national, state, and local market levels.

Beginning Tuesday, March 1, the HCUP Central Distributor will deliver Nationwide Databases via secure digital download. Once an order is complete, data purchasers will be able to access and securely download their zipped and encrypted files through their online HCUP Central Distributor account. These data files are quite large and, depending on connection speed and other variable internet conditions, may take anywhere from 10 minutes to more than an hour to download. Tips to facilitate successful downloads, as well as other updated Purchasing FAQs, are available on the web site. All State Databases will continue to be delivered on DVDs and shipped via FedEx. For questions concerning HCUP database purchases, contact the HCUP Central Distributor.

Thanks to Brooke Billman of the University of Arizona Health Sciences Library in Tucson for forwarding this information.