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Archive for the ‘Non-NLM Resources’ Category

Newly Revised, Web-Based NLM Disaster Information Specialization Courses Available!

The NLM Basic Level Courses for the Medical Library Association Disaster Information Specialization have all been updated to a new online web-based tutorial format. The courses are self-paced, interactive, and offered at no cost. Anyone completing all 15 hours of the courses is eligible to earn a Basic Level certificate in Disaster Information Specialization from MLA. The Basic Level courses include three from NLM Disaster Health:

  • Disaster Health Information Sources: The Basics
    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the essential resources needed to provide health-related information services for supporting disaster mitigation, planning, response, and recovery.
  • U.S. Response to Disasters and Public Health Emergencies
    This course provides an introduction to disaster/emergency planning and response as conducted in the United States, with an emphasis on medical response.
  • Information Roles in Disaster Management
    This course presents current research findings on librarians’ roles supporting the disaster workforce. Additionally, the information needs of first responders, emergency managers, and other professionals working in the areas of disaster planning, response, and recovery are discussed.

Two additional courses are available online, at no cost, from the FEMA Emergency Management Institute:

  • IS-700.A National Incident Management System (NIMS) An Introduction
    This course introduces and provides an overview of the National Incident Management System (NIMS). NIMS provides a consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together during domestic incidents.
  • IS-100.B Introduction to Incident Command System, ICS-100
    This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System (ICS). ICS is a standardized approach to incident management that enables a coordinated response among various jurisdictions and agencies; establishes common processes for planning and managing resources; and allows for the integration of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure.

New Free Resource: Compendium of Publicly Available Datasets for Factors Impacting Health of Minority Populations

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced the release of a new resource to aid researchers, public health practitioners and policymakers with data on health and health care disparities and social determinants of health. The Compendium of Publicly Available Datasets and Other Data-Related Resources is a free resource that compiles in one place descriptions of and links to 132 public datasets and resources that include information about health conditions and other factors that impact the health of minority populations.

The Compendium includes data and data-related resources from the following federal agencies within the HHS: Administration for Community Living (ACL); Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS); Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA); Indian Health Service (IHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH); and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). It also includes data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The Compendium was created by the Federal Interagency Health Equity Team of the National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities (NPA) to advance research, public policy and the public’s knowledge of issues related to health equity. It fills a gap that researchers and practitioners frequently face in locating federal datasets in one place, with information that is vital to conduct research on various topics. Check it out!

Free Webinar on November 29: Best Practices for Social Media Accessibility

Registration is available for the next session in the Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series, Getting Social: Best Practices for Social Media Accessibility, on November 29, from 10:00 to 11:30 AM PST. It will provide helpful tips and practices to ensure that your agency’s social media content attracts the largest possible audience while being accessible to individuals with disabilities. Presenters will review best practices for preparing and deploying social media that is accessible to all citizens. They also will provide an overview of the Federal Social Media Accessibility Toolkit, a key accessibility resource developed by the ePolicyWorks team in the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy that offers tips to improve the accessibility of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and blogs. Featured speakers include Hope Adler, ePolicyWorks, Communications Project Manager; Emily Ladau, ePolicyWorks, Communications Consultant; and Timothy P. Creagan, Senior Accessibility Specialist, U.S. Access Board (moderator).

New Web-Based Broadband Health Mapping Tool!

The Federal Communications Commission’s Connect2Health Task Force recently launched the Mapping Broadband Health in America tool, a web-based mapping tool that enables more efficient, data-driven decision making at the intersection of broadband and health. By allowing users to ask and answer questions about broadband and health at the county and census block levels, the tool provides critical data that can help drive broadband health policies and connected health solutions for this critical space. The mapping tool is an interactive experience, showing various aspects of connectivity and health for every state and county in the United States. Users can generate customized maps that display broadband access, adoption and speed data alongside various health measures (e.g., obesity, diabetes, disabilities and physician access) in urban and rural areas. These maps can be used by both public and private sectors and local communities to identify not only gaps, but also opportunities. Also released with the mapping platform are the Priority 100 and Rural 100 lists, identifying counties that have critical needs in broadband and health. Priority 100 is a list of the 100 counties nationwide with the greatest broadband and connectivity needs and populations of at least 25,000. Rural 100 is similar to Priority 100, but only includes rural areas with a population of 15,000 or more. Additional information is available in the Press Kit.

On November 10, 11:00am-12:00pm PST, the FCC’s Connect2Health Task Force and the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau’s Office of Intergovernmental Affairs will jointly host a free webinar to further explain and explore this new tool, Mapping Connected Health County by County. The session will focus on how state and local government offices, agencies and other local community stakeholders can effectively use the Mapping Broadband Health in America platform. Key audiences for the webinar include federal, state and local agencies and offices that address health, connectivity, technology and/or rural development; such as county health departments, public health officers and epidemiologists, broadband and technology officers, data analytics and GIS teams, and community health workers and strategists.

Three Ways to Find Health Twitter Chats!

Twitter chats are a great way for healthcare professionals to learn about resources related to specific health topics, raise public awareness of heath issues, and share their organization’s resources with other professionals and the general public. During a Twitter chat, one or more accounts hosting the chat will pose questions through their tweets, and attendees of the chat will answer the questions through tweets that include a hashtag specific to the chat, e.g., #HIVAgingChat. Following are three ways to locate Twitter chats related to health and wellness topics, which healthcare professionals on Twitter may wish to attend:

  • Follow NLM Twitter Handles: If you follow NLM_OSP, the Twitter account for the National Library of Medicine Outreach and Special Populations Branch, then you’ll often see announcements on upcoming Twitter chats related to health awareness and outreach topics. There are currently 18 Twitter accounts maintained by NLM, and many of the accounts promote and participate in health-related Twitter chats on a regular basis.
  • Check FYI Weekly Health Resources Newsletter: The Office of Minority Health publishes a weekly email bulletin called FYI: Weekly Health Resources, which lists information on grants, fellowships/scholarships, program resources, and more, including upcoming Twitter chats related to minority health.
  • Check the Twitter Chat Schedule on Symplur: The website Symplur tracks popular healthcare-related hashtags and also includes a weekly schedule of healthcare Twitter chats, with a list of upcoming one-time and irregularly scheduled chat sessions.

Participate in the Healthy People 2020 Public Comment Process October 6-27!

You are invited to participate in the upcoming Healthy People 2020 public comment process, which will be open from October 6 through October 27, 2016. The Healthy People team is seeking comments on an objective that is being considered as a potential addition to the HIV topic area. The proposed objective was developed by the HIV workgroup, which is led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). It has been reviewed by the Healthy People 2020 Federal Interagency Workgroup (FIW), and is now being presented for public review and comment. All comments received will be carefully reviewed by the HIV workgroup, the Healthy People 2020 FIW, and other Healthy People 2020 stakeholders.

AHRQ’s Evidence-based Practice Center Program Requests Suggestions for Systematic Review Topics

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s (AHRQ) Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) Program wants to hear from you about important topics for systematic evidence reviews. Nominations may be submitted online through October 31. The vision for AHRQ’s EPC Program is that all health care decisions are based on the best available evidence, resulting in the best possible health outcomes. The EPC Program funds 13 EPCs across the United States and Canada to conduct rigorous, comprehensive evidence reviews of the scientific literature. These reviews focus on a variety of clinical, behavioral, economic, and other issues. EPC evidence reviews are publicly available and may be used to support and inform activities, such as the development of clinical practice guidelines, policies, and translation materials.

The EPC program’s principles are to be: stakeholder-driven, scientifically rigorous, and independent and unbiased. Therefore, it’s critical that they hear from you regarding which topics to examine. EPC will review every proposed topic with these selection criteria: Appropriateness, importance, duplication, feasibility, potential impact of a new systematic review, and value. For more information about the topic nomination process, contact: EPC@ahrq.hhs.gov. To see what others have suggested, visit the AHRQ Effective Healthcare Program web site.

Newly Redesigned Think Cultural Health Website Released!

The Office of Minority Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced the launch of the newly redesigned Think Cultural Health website. It now includes designs that feature a simpler layout and brighter colors, and its responsive design means it can be accessed anytime from your cell phone, tablet, laptop, or desktop computer. The new design makes it easier for anyone to browse the latest resources and find information that will help individuals and organizations deliver respectful, understandable, and effective services to all. The following resources are included:

  • The National CLAS Standards section features an explanation of CLAS, a printable list of the Standards, the comprehensive technical assistance document called The Blueprint, and more.
  • The Education section features e-learning programs designed for disaster personnel, nurses, oral health professionals, physicians, community health workers, and more.
  • The Resources section features a searchable library of over 500 online resources, recorded presentations, educational video units on CLAS, and more.

Visit the Think Cultural Health website today and let the Office of Minority Health know what you think!

September is National Preparedness Month

The theme for 2016 National Preparedness Month is Don’t Wait, Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today. Ready.gov and CDC suggest weekly themes as reminders to take different types of action toward preparedness. NLM Disaster Health has paired some of its best preparedness resources with the weekly themes:

Week 2: Preparing Family & Friends
The Community and Personal Preparedness page is relevant throughout the month and year. Don’t forget your furry, feathered, and scaly friends when you prepare. Meanwhile, this week the CDC focuses on the critical role of Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs).

Week 3: Preparing Through Service
This week, focus on serving your larger community. Think about what your community can do to help prepare the very young, the very old, the disabled, and others with special needs. Meanwhile, the CDC suggests we learn more about what state and local health departments can do to be prepared.

Week 4: Individual Preparedness
Ready.gov suggests downloading disaster apps to your mobile devices. This would be a good week to check out the list of Disaster Apps for Your Digital Go Bag. The CDC proposes studying what resilient communities have in common.

Week 5: Lead up to America’s PrepareAthon
As National Preparedness Month draws to a close, Ready.gov suggests you “be counted and register your preparedness event.” Consider listening to an archived NLM Disaster Health webinar in which librarians and other information specialists discuss their roles in the disaster life cycle. The CDC reminds us this week to prepare ourselves; just in time for America’s PrepareAthon on Friday, September 30!

Celebrate Go4Life Month in September!

The National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health, has a variety of free materials to help seniors become and stay physically active, including sample exercises, an exercise guide book, easy-to-print tip sheets with information about the health benefits of physical activity, and even tools for setting goals and tracking progress. The information in these resources is based on research in people ages 50+. The NIH Go4Life exercise and physical activity campaign provides strategies to encourage seniors about ways to incorporate exercise into their daily lives. Seniors can also get activity ideas and sign up to receive free e-mail exercise tips and weekly motivation from Go4Life virtual coaches. Also, join the celebration of Go4Life Month during September. This year’s theme is #Fit4Function, focusing on the practical benefits of exercise and physical activity, like being able to drive, carry groceries into the house, do yardwork, and walk the dog; all of which are important activities to older adults!