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Archive for the ‘NLM Resources’ Category

Report Citation Errors in PubMed Directly to Publishers

The PubMed Data Management System (PMDM), which allows publishers or their authorized representatives to update or correct nearly all elements of their citations, is now available. PubMed users should report basic citation errors in PubMed data directly to the publisher, including errors in author names, affiliations, or citation bibliographic information (such as date of publication, volume, issue, and page or e-location), typographical errors in titles or abstracts, and errors in grants or databanks. PMDM is a secure Web application for PubMed data providers to access and edit their PubMed citation data. Nearly all citation elements can be updated at any time after initial receipt of their records by PubMed. The vast majority of PubMed citations are supplied electronically by publishers or their representatives, and the PMDM was created to improve the ease and timeliness for publishers to update and correct their own citations. Changes made in the PMDM are reflected in PubMed within 24-48 hours.

With the implementation of PMDM, NLM is no longer routinely updating or correcting publisher-supplied citations. Users who report citation errors in PubMed to NLM will be directed to contact the publisher directly. NLM will continue to receive and investigate error reports about value-added data on the citations, for example, MeSH Headings and Subheadings, Supplementary Concepts, and Publication Types. Use the Contact Us form for these reports.

Recording Available for Inaugural Session of “NN/LM Resource Picks” Webinar Series

The archived recording of the first one-hour session for the new NN/LM collaborative webinar series, NN/LM Resource Picks, is available. The topic was Don’t Wait, Communicate About Disaster Preparedness! with presenter Siobhan Champ-Blackwell from NLM’s Specialized Information Services Division, Disaster Information Management Research Center. View the webinar by clicking on the YouTube video player below.

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NLM Announces Important Dates for MEDLINE/PubMed 2017 Year-End Processing Activities

The National Library of Medicine is currently involved in MEDLINE year-end processing (YEP) activities. These include changing the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) main headings and subheadings as well as Supplementary Concept Records that standardize names and associated numbers for chemicals, protocols, and diseases that are not main headings. The MeSH edits include maintaining existing MEDLINE citations to conform with the 2017 version of MeSH, and other global changes.

Important Dates

  • November 15, 2016: NLM expects to temporarily suspend the addition of fully-indexed MEDLINE citations to PubMed. NLM will continue to add Publisher-supplied and in process citations.
  • Mid-December 2016: PubMed MEDLINE citations, translation tables, and the MeSH database will have been updated to reflect 2017 MeSH.

For details about the impact on searching from November 16 to mid-December, visit Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Impact on Searching During Fall 2016. For background information on the general kinds of changes made annually, visit Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Background Information.

NLM Policy Change for Identification of Partial Retractions in MEDLINE/PubMed

The National Library of Medicine began keeping separate statistics on partial retractions in December 2006 and reporting them on the MEDLINE Key Indicators page when a journal identified an article as partially retracted. In 2006, NLM expected that partial retractions would be a new designation that publishers would be using. These were cases when some aspect of the article, such as a table, chart, image, etc., was determined to be incorrect, but the overall methodology or conclusion(s) of the paper were not affected. Since 2006, only 42 articles have been designated as “partially retracted.” In addition, the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Retraction Guidelines state that partial retractions make it difficult for users to know which parts of an article are or are not reliable or the correct status of the article.

Beginning in October 2016, NLM will discontinue the identification of partial retractions in MEDLINE/PubMed. Previously, the Retracted Publication designation was added as a Publication Type to the citation for the article, which also triggered the Retracted Article banner on the Abstract display in PubMed, and Retraction of Publication was used as the Publication Type for the notice citation. NLM also linked the citations using a “Partial retraction in” label on the article citation and a “Partial retraction of” label on the notice citation. Instead, this type of notice will be treated as a published erratum. NLM will no longer use the retraction-related Publication Types on these citations, and the Retracted Article banner will no longer appear on the Abstract display; the notice citation will have Published Erratum as the Publication Type. The citations will continue to be linked, but will use an “Erratum in” label on the article citation and an “Erratum for” label on the notice citation, as is the case for other errata/correction notices. NLM has edited the existing 42 pairs of citations to reflect the new policy and the “Errata” Fact Sheet has been edited to reflect the new policy.

New Webinar Series: Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data

On Wednesday, October 19, 11:00am – 12:00pm PDT, NLM will host the first session of a new Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data series of webinars, beginning with Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed. The webinar series will promote more powerful and flexible ways of accessing NLM data, starting with an introduction to the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for PubMed and other NCBI databases. The series is geared toward librarians and other information specialists who have experience using PubMed via the traditional Web interface, but now want to dig deeper. This class will start with the very basics of APIs, and then move on to showing how to get started using the E-utilities API to search and retrieve records from PubMed. The class will also showcase some specific tools and utilities that information specialists can use to work with E-utilities, helping to prepare for subsequent Insider’s Guide classes. The session will conclude by looking at some practical examples of E-utilities in the real world, and hopefully inspire you to get out and put these lessons to use!

University of Michigan Offers Live Streaming of NCBI Discovery Workshops October 4-6

Remote site registration is available for a series of three three-hour NCBI Discovery Workshops hosted by the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan on October 4-6, with instructors Peter Cooper, Ph.D., and Wayne Matten, Ph.D. The sessions will be streamed using BlueJeans. The workshops are:

  • Tuesday, 10/4, – Navigating NCBI Molecular Data Using the Integrated Entrez System and BLAST
  • Wednesday, 10/5, – A Practical Guide to NCBI BLAST
  • Thursday, 10/6, – EDirect: Command Line Access to NCBI’s Biomolecular Databases

Health Hotlines Database To Be Retired January 2017

Health Hotlines was developed by NLM as a community service to help the public locate health-related information from organizations with toll free numbers. NLM has decided it will no longer update the Health Hotlines database because most of the information is now readily available through web search engines and many of the organizations no longer have toll-free numbers. Health Hotlines will remain online until the end of January, 2017, at which time it will be retired.

Complementary Therapies and Traditional Healing Resources from NLM

Medical treatments not considered part of mainstream medicine are often called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Examples include herbal supplements, acupuncture, meditation, and other forms of treatment. NLM’s Arctic Health portal defines traditional healing as treatment that focuses on the health and wellness of the individual in the context of culture and community, and it incorporates Native beliefs, practices, and traditional ecological knowledge. Traditional healing may be practiced by Native American communities across the U.S., including Alaska and the Arctic region. Resources for both complementary medicine and traditional healing are available through the National Library of Medicine for many different populations, including:

  • For the General Public – MedlinePlus provides an overview of various complementary and alternative therapy health topics, as well as reliable information on the health benefits and possible side effects for a long list of herbs and supplements.
  • For Older Adults – NIH Senior Health discusses a variety of topics on complementary health approaches, including information on natural products, mind and body practices, the safety of these complementary health approaches, and how to be an informed consumer with complementary health treatments.
  • For Native American Communities – The American Indian Health portal includes a list of traditional healing resources, with resources for community members, researchers, health professionals, educators, and the general public. The Traditional Healing section of the Arctic Health portal lists organizations and programs, stories, research and learning tools, and teaching tools for traditional healing practices of Native American communities in the Arctic region.

Retention of Ceased Abstracting and Indexing Publications Containing MEDLINE Citations

Does your collection include abstracting and indexing titles produced in cooperation with NLM, such as Hospital Literature Index and/or its successor Hospital and Health Administration Index, Index to Dental Literature, or International Nursing Index, all of which had ceased publication by the year 2000? In general, the NLM-derived citations in these publications are available in MEDLINE/PubMed. However, all of these publications also contained separate sections for monographic materials, which may not be available in the NLM collection. Therefore, NLM advises librarians that if access to the monographic materials in these tools are important at your institution, then retain these old print indexes in your collection. More details about each publication are available in this FAQ.

Resources for Teachers and Students from NLM

School is back in session, and NLM’s Specialized Information Services provides a variety of educational resources for students of all ages. Following are a few examples:

  • K-12 Science and Health Education: Browse through a list of useful links to lesson plans, projects, and webpages on many different science/health topics for K-12 students.
  • Environmental Health Student Portal: Information and activities for middle school students on environmental health topics like air pollution, chemicals, climate change, and water pollution. A section for teachers provides additional links to lesson plans.
  • GeneEd: Links to vetted genetic websites based on high school science curricula. A section with Teacher’s Resources provides a list of resources organized under various genetics topics, like bio-statistics, biotechnology, cell biology, and more.
  • ToxMystery: Interactive game for ages 7-11 on household chemical hazards, including a page with lesson plans for teachers.
  • ToxTown for Teachers: Lesson plans and links for educators to help them use the ToxTown page for teaching students about environmental health and toxic chemicals in everyday environments.