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Archive for the ‘NLM Resources’ Category

NN/LM Webinar on March 15: “What’s New in Post-Publication Activities in PubMed”

Join the one-hour NN/LM Webinar, What’s New in Post-Publication Activities in PubMed, on March 15, 1:00-2:00 PM PDT. Hilda Bastian from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) will present a discussion of the changing visibility and accessibility of post-publication activity in PubMed. The webinar is part of the PNR Rendezvous monthly webinar series from the NN/LM Pacific Northwest Region.

NLM Announces Addition of CDC’s Vaccines Administered Data to RxNorm Terminology

The National Library of Medicine has announced the addition of CVX (Vaccines Administered) as a new data source to RxNorm. The addition of CVX data to RxNorm helps facilitate the electronic exchange of vaccine information in electronic health records. CVX includes both active and inactive vaccines available in the United States. CVX codes for inactive vaccines allow electronic transmission of historical immunization records. CVX is maintained and developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center of Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).

PubMed Subject Filter Strategies Updated for 2017

PubMed subject filter strategies are reviewed each year to determine if modifications are necessary. Modifications may include revisions due to changes in Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) vocabulary or MEDLINE journals, adding or deleting terms, and changing parts of a strategy to optimize retrieval. The following subset strategies were recently revised:

  • AIDS
  • Bioethics
  • Cancer
  • Complementary Medicine
  • Dietary Supplements
  • Systematic Reviews
  • Toxicology

Resources for Finding and Visualizing Health Data and Statistics

Health outreach professionals often need to locate health statistics and data, to learn what kinds of health issues affect specific populations. The data may need to be visualized in chart, graph, or map format, to include in reports for policy makers and for the general public. Where can you find the raw data related to public health, and what tools are available to visualize the data? Following are a few resources related to health data, statistics, and data visualization that may be useful:

  • Learn about Health Statistics on MedlinePlus: Your first stop can be the Health Statistics page on MedlinePlus, where you can read a quick summary about health statistics and access links to a wide variety of reliable health statistics resources.
  • Find Public Datasets Related to Health Disparities: The Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently announced the release of the National Partnership for Action (NPA) Compendium of Publicly Available Datasets and Other Data-Related Resources, a free resource that compiles descriptions of and links to 132 public datasets and resources that include information about health conditions and other factors that impact the health of minority populations.
  • Visualize Toxic Chemical Health Data on TOXMAP: The TOXMAP tool can be used to visualize locations of Toxic Release Inventory facilities, Superfund sites, Environment Canada’s National Pollutant Release Inventory data, location of nuclear plants, and location of EPA coal plants, with additional layers of US census and health data added to the map to illustrate environmental health disparities in specific locations.
  • Learn How to Create Community Health Maps: Use the Community Health Mapping Lab Exercises to learn free and low cost methods for collecting field data, combining field data with other organizational data, and visualizing the data through online mapping tools.

What’s New on NLM’s Radiation Emergency Medical Management (REMM) Resource

Since the last REMM update in August, 2016, the following important US government document have been incorporated into the resource. Additional information is available by visiting What’s New on REMM?

An update to Mobile REMM is also coming soon!

New Look for NLM Search Engine Results Display!

The National Library of Medicine has just released a new design for its main Web site search engine results page. The new design is responsive and is a result of usability testing, analytics, and user feedback. Searches for health topics will feature a MedlinePlus result on the right side of the screen. Search results from PubMed and the LocatorPlus catalog record will display separately, also on the right. Searches for an NLM product or service will highlight a curated result in the “NLM Recommended Resources” box. The facets have been combined into four basic categories and now can be found above the results display. They include:

  • Health Information: MedlinePlus encyclopedia pages, drug monographs, health topic pages, supplement pages, and MedlinePlus Magazine pages.
  • Programs and Services: NLM main Web site pages including NCBI and SIS.
  • Exhibits and Collections: History of Medicine Division exhibition sites and the Digital Collections records.
  • Web Archives: Older Web pages from the NLM main Web site.
Snapshot of NLM website search engine page

Further details about the redesigned web site are available in the NLM Technical Bulletin.

NN/LM Webinar on March 9: Five Questions You Can Answer Using the NCBI Gene Database

Registration is available for the one-hour NN/LM webinar Five Questions You Can Answer Using the NCBI Gene Database, on Thursday, March 9, 10:00-11:00 AM PST. Presenters will be Peter Cooper and Bonnie Maidak from NCBI. The Gene resource at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is a central hub for accessing nearly all molecular and literature resources for a particular gene. You can easily answer the most common questions and perform the most common tasks by starting in Gene. This webinar will cover the structure and contents of the Gene resource and how to use it to answer the following questions:

  • Where is the gene located (chromosome and position) in the genome assembly?
  • What are the Reference genomic, transcript and protein sequences for the gene?
  • What variations are present in the gene and are they associated with disease?
  • In what tissues and under what conditions is the gene expressed?
  • What are the equivalent genes (homologs) in other species?

NIH Request for Information (RFI) on Processes for database of Genotypes and Phenotypes Data Submission, Access, and Management

The National Institutes of Health has just issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking public comment on the data submission and access processes for the NIH National Center for Biotechnology (NCBI) database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). The RFI also seeks comment on the management of data in dbGaP in order to consider options to improve and streamline these processes and to maximize the use and utility of dbGaP. The complete RFI, as well as instructions on how to comment, are available on the NIH website. Electronic responses will be accepted through April 7, 2017. NIH will consider all public comments before taking next steps. No proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should be included in responses. Comments received, including any personal information, will be posted without change after the close of the comment period to the NIH Genomic Data Sharing website.

Additional information about the importance of this RFI is included in a new Under the Poliscope blog posting, published by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz. For more information or additional questions, please contact the NIH Office of Science Policy.

National Library of Medicine’s TOXMAP Resource Now Includes TRI 2015 Data

NLM’s TOXMAP now includes 2015 Toxics Release Inventory data. This corresponds to the most recent TRI National Analysis published by the US EPA. TOXMAP maps the TRI chemicals reported to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as required by the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA). A complete list of TRI chemicals required to be reported to the EPA is available on the website.

MedlinePlus Reaches Major Milestone: Launch of Its 1000th Health Topic Page!

A major milestone was recently reached as MedlinePlus.gov launched its 1,000th health topic page about “Eye Care.” Created and maintained by the National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health’s website providing trusted health information to the public. The winner of multiple awards and a consistent top scorer among federal websites, MedlinePlus debuted in 1998 with 22 health topic pages, which bring together information on a particular disease, condition, or wellness issue. Each health topic page provides a description of the condition or issue and directs users to vetted information from the NIH and other trusted sources. All content on MedlinePlus is reviewed and must meet strict quality guidelines.

MedlinePlus has steadily added new topics to respond to the growing needs of the public for reliable, up-to-date health information. The demand for additional health topics grew with the 2010 launch of MedlinePlus Connect, a service that links Electronic Health Records and other Health IT systems to targeted information from MedlinePlus. Today, over a million people visit MedlinePlus daily and benefit from the health topic pages, a medical encyclopedia, health news, surgery videos, a medical dictionary and much more. A Spanish language version of the site, MedlinePlus en español, premiered in 2002.