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Archive for the ‘Mobile Devices’ Category

Freely Available Print Guides for NLM Resources

The Outreach and Special Populations Branch of the National Library of Medicine provides a variety of brochures, fact sheets, and wallet cards related to consumer health, minority health, HIV/AIDS resources, and many other important health topics. Following are a few of the useful resources that can be downloaded as PDFs, printed, and shared with patrons, students, patients, and colleagues:

  • Consumer Health Resources Wallet Card (PDF, 600 KB) – A list of online health resources from NLM that will be useful to the general public, on a foldable card that can be stored in any wallet or billfold.
  • Resources for Public Health Professionals Fact Sheet (PDF, 250 KB, October 2015) – Brief descriptions and links to important NLM online resources, including emergency/incident planning and response resources and NLM mobile resources and applications.
  • HIV/AIDS Information Resources Flyer (PDF, 860 KB, May 2015) and Wallet Card (PDF, 412 KB) – NLM resources that will be helpful in locating general information, treatment information, clinical trials, multilingual resources, and training resources related to HIV/AIDS.

TOXNET Update: Chemical Databases Now Link to Most Recent Five Years of PubMed Citations

The following National Library of Medicine (NLM) TOXNET databases now provide a link to an NLM PubMed search for the past five years of publications:

The PubMed (mobile version) results will appear in a new tab.

National Library of Medicine’s Tox Town Farm Scene Gets an Update!

If you are looking for possible environmental health risks on a typical farm or need information on agricultural runoff, feeding operations or barns and silos, check out the newly updated National Library of Medicine (NLM) Tox Town Farm Scene.

The Farm joins previously updated Tox Town CityTown and Southwest scenes with an updated, photorealistic look to allow users to better identify with real-life locations. Each scene migrated from Flash to HTML 5 platform so it can be viewed on a variety of personal electronic devices, including iPads, iPad minis, and tablets. All location and chemical information remains the same.

Tox Town Updates the Farm Scene!

If you are looking for possible environmental health risks in a typical farm or need information on agricultural runoff, feeding operations, or barns and silos, check out the newly updated Tox Town Farm scene. The Farm joins previously updated City, Town and Southwest scenes with an updated, photorealistic look to allow users to better identify with real-life locations. Each scene was also moved from Flash to HTML 5 platform, to allow viewing on a variety of personal electronic devices, including iPads, iPad minis, and tablets. All location and chemical information remains the same.

NLM’s Genetics Home Reference Gets a New Look for DNA Day!

Launched by the National Library of Medicine in 2003, Genetics Home Reference, the Web site for consumer-friendly information about the effects of genetic variation on human health, has undergone a major makeover. The new site became available on April 25, which is DNA Day and the 13th anniversary of Genetics Home Reference. Designed for patients, their families, and others with an interest in human genetics, Genetics Home Reference currently offers Web pages about more than 1,100 health conditions and diseases, more than 1,300 genes, all of the human chromosomes, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It also includes a richly illustrated genetics primer, Help Me Understand Genetics, which offers a basic explanation of how genes work and how mutations cause disorders. In addition, the site includes current information about genetic testing, gene therapy, genetics research, and precision medicine. Genetics Home Reference has proved to be a trusted and widely searched source of information, with on average about 1.5 million visitors and 3.6 million page views each month.

The Genetics Home Reference redesign is based on feedback from an online customer satisfaction survey, with comments collected since November 2014. The most frequent suggestions for improvement include adding more images, updating the site’s look and feel, and changing the font. These and other comments have been addressed, and features of the redesigned site include:

  • A redesigned home page for enhanced usability
  • Colors and icons that help distinguish the Web site’s different content areas
  • A dynamic list of new and updated content on the Web site
  • Streamlined navigation of health condition, gene, and chromosome pages, to make it easier to find information of interest
  • In-text links that improve navigation between related topics on Genetics Home Reference
  • Educational images from the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other sources integrated into health condition summaries
  • Improved browser printing
  • Acknowledgment of more than 200 support and advocacy groups for their feedback on Web site content
  • Improved usability on mobile devices (mobile-responsive design)

To learn more, visit this NLM in Focus article and interview with Stephanie M. Morrison, MPH, coordinator of the site.

WHO Launches the Zika App for Health Care Providers

The World Health Organization has created a Zika app that gathers all of WHO’s guidance for agencies and individuals involved in the response to Zika Virus Disease and its suspected complications such as microcephaly, and for health care workers such as doctors, nurses and community health workers. The English version of the app is now available both in Android and iOS versions. It will be soon be available in all United Nations’ official languages and Portuguese!

NLM Announces Pill Image Recognition Challenge

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) announced its Pill Image Recognition Challenge January 19, 2016 in the Federal Register. The Pill Image Recognition Challenge will also be posted on Challenge.gov. The submission period for the Challenge is April 4, 2016 to May 31, 2016, with winners announced August 1, 2016.

The Pill Image Recognition Challenge is a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Challenge under the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science) Reauthorization Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-358). Through this Challenge the National Library of Medicine (NLM) seeks algorithms and software to match images of prescription oral solid-dose pharmaceutical medications (pills, including capsules and tablets). The objective of the Challenge is the development and discovery of high-quality algorithms and software that rank how well consumer images of prescription pills match reference images of pills in the authoritative NLM RxIMAGE database. NLM will use the Challenge entries (i.e., algorithm and software) to create a future API (Application Programming Interface) and a future software system for pill image recognition; the API will be freely accessible and the system will be freely usable.

For further details, visit the NLM News & Events page.

New AIDSinfo HIV/AIDS Treatment Guidelines App Released!

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has announced the release of a new AIDSinfo Treatment Guidelines app for both iOS and Android devices. The AIDSinfo Treatment Guidelines app provides mobile access to the HIV/AIDS medical practice guidelines developed by working groups of the NIH Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council. The guidelines include recommendations by expert panels on the treatment of HIV infection and related opportunistic infections in adults, adolescents, and children and on the management of perinatal HIV infection.

Health care providers surveyed on the AIDSinfo website expect mobile access to up-to-date HIV information at the point of care even when an Internet connection is unavailable. Designed to meet that expectation, the app automatically refreshes guidelines content when the user is connected to a wireless or cellular data network. When wireless Internet access is not available, app users can view and search the guidelines offline, and the app will check for and download any updates when the user is back online and connected again.

Available for both iOS and Android devices, the free AIDSinfo Guidelines app includes several features to personalize the app to meet individual needs. Using these features, app users can:

  • View only guideline recommendations or tables
  • Receive alert notifications when a new guideline is released or guideline content is updated
  • Bookmark sections of a guideline
  • Add notes to sections of a guideline
  • Share guidelines and notes via social media, email, or text
  • Search for information within guidelines
  • Use the guideline spell suggest feature for searching when connected to wireless or using cellular data

The free Guidelines app may also be downloaded from the AIDSinfo website. NLM encourages feedback on this app and other features of AIDSinfo. Please email your comments and suggestions to ContactUs@aidsinfo.nih.gov.

Bring Gaming to Your Science Classroom

Screentshot of Bohr ThruThe use of gaming in the classroom provides a new medium for teachers to introduce or reinforce key concepts in the curriculum. How to incorporate this new medium seems to have taken online webinars for teachers by storm. Yet are there enough online games that both engage students and provide a real opportunity to learn? Over the summer, the NLM had the opportunity to work with a high school teacher to create two pilot iOS game apps. This was their first attempt to map a gaming app to curriculum objectives taught in high school science. Both games include attractive game design and interactive gameplay, and offer teachers the opportunity to “pause” the game at various times for “teachable moments.” Your students will love taking a break from whiteboards and lectures to try their hand at these fun yet educational games. In addition to these two games, a third game created for the K-12 community involves the reinforcement of concepts that relate to greenhouse gas reduction, the use of renewable energies, and the value of green product purchases.

Bohr Thru: A trip Through the First 18 Elements
In this game, students become familiar with the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons necessary to build each of the first 18 elements. With the help of “Atom,” the game’s main character, students learn fun and interesting facts about the chemical elements. To reinforce content during game play, students can earn “power-ups” when they successfully add electrons to complete Bohr Models for an element.

Base Chase: “A” is to “T” as “G” is to “C”
The basic goal of this game is to reinforce matching bases and the importance these pairs play in the development of a species DNA. The game uses a jumping mechanic to collect different animals found within the African Savanna. After a player has matched enough DNA the animal appears along with “DeeNA,” a whimsical DNA strand character that delivers important information concerning DNA.

Run4Green: Help to Keep our Environment Clean
In this Mario style game, our fun Earthly character tries to collect points (gold coins) in order to purchase green products to help save our environment. Along the way, the character tries to avoid products that produce greenhouse gases and identify those that can help to reduce our carbon footprint.

Bohr Thru, Base Chase, and Run4Green require iOS 7.0 or later, are compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, and are freely available for download.

Radiation Emergency Medical Management (REMM) Website Redesign and Content Update!

Redesigned REMM websiteRadiation Emergency Medical Management (REMM) has released its first major redesign since its 2007 launch. The redesign includes a more modern banner, a new color palette and font style, and a new navigation system. There are now six content groups on the new home page. One of the most popular features, the Multimedia Library in carousel form, remains on the home page, with seven categories of multimedia assets. The redesigned site now includes behavioral health resources and material for additional stakeholders, including first responders, senior health care leaders, veterinarians and public information officers. Since the last major content update in November 2014, significant content updates have been added to the web site including:

Users who have previously bookmarked REMM pages of interest should know that all prior URLs have been retained, so the bookmarks will still work. Users who have visited REMM pages before may need to refresh (reload) the web page to see the new design. Otherwise, only the old pages cached in your browser will display. The majority of the information from the website can be downloaded for use during an emergency if the internet is not accessible. A smartphone app containing REMM information, called Mobile REMM, also is available for the Apple and Android platforms.