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Archive for the ‘Informatics’ Category

Apply by December 5 for 2017 Spring and Fall NLM Georgia Biomedical Informatics Courses!

The National Library of Medicine, in partnership with Augusta University, has announced that the application period for the 2017 NLM Georgia Biomedical Informatics Course is now open. The Biomedical Informatics course offers participants a week-long immersive experience in biomedical informatics taught by experts in the field. The course guides participants through topics including biomedical informatics methods, clinical informatics, big data and imaging, genomics, consumer health informatics, mathematical modeling, and telemedicine and telehealth. The course will be held at Brasstown Valley Resort and Spa in Young Harris, GA. Costs for attending this course including travel, housing, and meals are fully funded for attendees. If admitted, participants are expected to attend the entire week (all sessions and activities). No family members or guests are permitted.

There is one application for both the Spring (April 2-8) and Fall (September 10-16) courses. The application period closes on December 5, 2016. For questions, contact In addition, a special informational webinar about the course is being hosted by the NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region on October 25, from 10:00-11:00 AM PDT.

AHRQ’s Evidence-based Practice Center Program Requests Suggestions for Systematic Review Topics

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s (AHRQ) Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) Program wants to hear from you about important topics for systematic evidence reviews. Nominations may be submitted online through October 31. The vision for AHRQ’s EPC Program is that all health care decisions are based on the best available evidence, resulting in the best possible health outcomes. The EPC Program funds 13 EPCs across the United States and Canada to conduct rigorous, comprehensive evidence reviews of the scientific literature. These reviews focus on a variety of clinical, behavioral, economic, and other issues. EPC evidence reviews are publicly available and may be used to support and inform activities, such as the development of clinical practice guidelines, policies, and translation materials.

The EPC program’s principles are to be: stakeholder-driven, scientifically rigorous, and independent and unbiased. Therefore, it’s critical that they hear from you regarding which topics to examine. EPC will review every proposed topic with these selection criteria: Appropriateness, importance, duplication, feasibility, potential impact of a new systematic review, and value. For more information about the topic nomination process, contact: To see what others have suggested, visit the AHRQ Effective Healthcare Program web site.

NLM Announces Reissuance of Career Development Award in Biomedical Informatics and Data Science (K01)

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Career Development Award in Biomedical Informatics and Data Science (K01) is intended to provide support for promising junior investigators as they launch their research careers in biomedical informatics research and data science. NLM supports research career development in healthcare/clinical informatics, translational bioinformatics, clinical research informatics and public health informatics. Informatics is defined as the intersection of computer science, information science, data science and social/behavioral sciences with one or more biomedical application domains. Application domains of interest include health care delivery and consumer health, translation of basic biological research to health outcomes, population medicine and public health, and the organization, analysis and use of biomedical big data. Regardless of the application domain, the research career focus should be informatics. The award is intended to promote the career development of informatics researchers who intend to make a long term commitment to biomedical informatics research. K01 awardees are expected to apply for NIH or other independent research grant support (R01 or equivalent) during the final year of the award. Candidates who received their training at one of NLM’s university-based biomedical informatics training programs are encouraged to apply.

Candidates for this award must have a research or health-professional doctoral degree or equivalent. Junior investigators (i.e. early stage of faculty positions within three years of initial appointments at time of application submission or resubmission) are eligible for this award and will have completed their research training. At the time of award, the institution must demonstrate that the applicant will have the academic title, space and other resources necessary to apply for research project grant (e.g., R01) level funding. The candidates must have research experience (length of time may vary) and be committed to developing into independent biomedical investigators in research areas relevant to the mission of the NLM. The program is not intended to support additional postdoctoral training and is not intended to support career changes from non-research to research careers for individuals without prior research training.

Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to contact the NLM Program Officer relevant to their research area before preparing an application to discuss the relevance of the proposed research to NLM’s current research priorities and for guidance on the proposed research and career development plans. Further information is available on the NLM web site.

Apply by December 7 to attend the Winter 2016 NLM online class “Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching”

Health science librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online bioinformatics training course, Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC). The course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to bioinformatics theory and practice in support of developing and implementing library-based bioinformatics products and services. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services.

This course is offered online (asynchronously) from January 11 – February 19, 2016. The format includes video lectures, readings, a molecular vocabulary exercise, an NCBI discovery exercise, and other hands-on exercises. The instructor is Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo. The course is a prerequisite for the face-to-face workshop, Librarian’s Guide to NCBI. Participants who complete the required coursework and earn full continuing education credit will be eligible to apply to attend the 5-day Librarian’s Guide in the future.

Due to limited enrollment, interested participants are required to complete an application form. The deadline for completing the application is December 7, 2015; participants will be notified of acceptance on December 21, 2015. The course is offered at no cost to participants. Participants who complete all assignments and the course evaluation by the due dates will receive 25 hours of MLA CE credit. No partial CE credit is granted. For questions, contact the course organizers.

NLM Informatics Lecture Series on November 4: Use of Clinical Big Data to Inform Precision Medicine

The next session of the National Library of Medicine Informatics Lecture Series will be held on November 4, at 11:00am-12:00pm PST, with the feature presentation Use of Clinical Big Data to Inform Precision Medicine. The speaker will be Joshua Denny, MD, Associate Professor in the Departments of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. This talk will be broadcast live and archived.

At Vanderbilt, Dr. Denny and his team have linked phenotypic information from de-identified electronic health records (EHRs) to a DNA repository of nearly 200,000 samples, creating a ‘virtual’ cohort. This approach allows study of genomic basis of disease and drug response using real-world clinical data. Finding the right information in the EHR can be challenging, but the combination of billing data, laboratory data, medication exposures, and natural language processing has enabled efficient study of genomic and pharmacogenomic phenotypes. The Vanderbilt research team has put many of these discovered pharmacogenomic characteristics into practice through clinical decision support. The EHR also enables the inverse experiment – starting with a genotype and discovering all the phenotypes with which it is associated – a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS). Dr. Denny’s research team has used PheWAS to replicate more than 300 genotype-phenotype associations, characterize pleiotropy, and discover new associations. They have also used PheWAS to identify characteristics within disease subtypes.

Dr. Denny is part of the NIH-supported Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network, Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN), and Implementing Genomics in Practice (IGNITE) networks. He is a past recipient of the American Medical Informatics Association New Investigator Award, Homer Warner Award, and Vanderbilt Chancellor’s Award for Research. Dr. Denny remains active in clinical care and in teaching students. He is also a member of the National Library of Medicine Biomedical Library and Informatics Review Committee.

2016 NLM Georgia Biomedical Informatics Course Applications Now Being Accepted!

Applications are now being accepted for the 2016 National Library of Medicine (NLM) Georgia Biomedical Informatics Courses to be held April 3-9 and September 11-17 at Brasstown Valley Conference Center in Young Harris, Georgia. Applications will be accepted until December 7. All applicants will be notified by the end of January/early February of their application status. Successful applicants will be asked for a commitment to attend the entire course and all sessions. Travel, hotel, and meals of all successful applicants will be paid for by Georgia Regents University (soon to be Augusta University). For questions, feel free to contact Adrienne Hayes.

New NLM Resource for Nursing Standards and Interoperability

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has released a new web page, Nursing Resources for Standards and Interoperability. The page is a resource for nurses, students, informaticians, and anyone interested in nursing terminologies for systems development. It describes the role of SNOMED CT and Laboratory Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) in implementing Meaningful Use in the United States, specifically for the nursing care domain.

NLM has provided this resource in response to the position statement released by the American Nurses Association (ANA) that reaffirms support for use of recognized terminologies in coding nursing problems, interventions and observations (SNOMED CT), and in nursing assessments and outcomes (LOINC). In addition to SNOMED CT and LOINC, the Nursing Resources for Standards and Interoperability page provides information about other highly utilized nursing terminologies. The resource page provides a new two-minute video tutorial that describes how to use the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus Browser to find Concept Unique Identifiers (CUIs) and extract concept-level synonyms between SNOMED CT and other nursing terminologies. Additionally, links to other NLM Terminology resources and helpful resources are provided.

NLM welcomes feedback on the Nursing Resources for Standards and Interoperability page. Please send comments to NLM Customer Service.

Applications Now Being Accepted for NLM’s 2015-2016 “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Bioinformatics Course

Librarians in the United States who specialize in health and related sciences are invited to participate in the next offering of the bioinformatics training course, A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC). The course provides knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. Participating in the Librarian’s Guide course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution. Instructors will be NCBI staff and Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo.

The two parts to A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI are Part 1: Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching, an online (asynchronous) course, October 26-December 11, 2015, and Part 2: A 5-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, MD, March 7-11, 2016. Applicants must complete both parts. Participants must complete the pre-course with full CE credit (Part 1) in order to advance to attend the 5-day in-person course (Part 2).

Applications are open to librarians in the United States who specialize in health science or related sciences. Applications will be accepted both from librarians currently providing bioinformatics services as well as from those desiring to implement services. Enrollment is limited 25 participants. There is no charge for the classes. Travel, lodging and meal costs for the in-person class are at the expense of the participant. The application deadline is September 14, 2015 and acceptance notification will be on or about October 5, 2015. Once you complete the Application Form, you will be directed to download the Supervisor Support Statement. This is to be filled out and signed by your immediate supervisor. This statement describes your current and/or future role in bioinformatics support at your institution and confirms your availability to attend the course if selected. Provide your current curriculum vitae (CV). Please use the suggested CV model as a guideline for the type of information desired. Your application is not complete until both your CV and the Supervisor Support Statement are received, in addition to the Application Form.

Nominations and Applications Being Accepted for Seven IHTSDO Advisory Groups

NLM is announcing on behalf of the IHTSDO (International Health Terminology Standards Development Organization) the formation of seven new IHTSDO Advisory Groups (AGs). The AGs are the successors of the IHTSDO Standing Committees, which will allow for a more agile and flexible structure. The AGs will conduct specific activities that will contribute to the fulfillment of the IHTSDO Management Team’s responsibilities or the organization’s mandate.

The IHTSDO is seeking volunteers to serve on the following AGs:

  1. Content Managers Advisory Group
  2. E-Learning Advisory Group
  3. Modeling Advisory Group
  4. SNOMED CT Editorial Advisory Group
  5. Software Developers Advisory Group
  6. Terminology Release Advisory Group
  7. Tooling User Advisory Group

For additional information on the different Advisory Groups as well as the nomination and application process, please see the IHTSDO news note, Join an Advisory Group. The nomination period is open until August 14, 2015.

Assessing Patient Health Information Needs

On May 7th, the Health Information Technology section of AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) sponsored the presentation A National Web Conference on Assessing Patient Health Information Needs for Developing Consumer Health IT Tools. Featured speakers included:

  • Wanda Pratt, Ph.D., Professor, Information School, University of Washington
  • James Ralston, M.D., Associate Investigator/Physician, Internal Medicine, Group Health Research Institute
  • Patricia Flatley Brennan, Ph.D., Moehlman Bascom Professor, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin- Madison

The presenters described projects to improve communication of safety concerns among hospitalized patients, promote effective management of patients with diabetes, and improve asthma care in children. Presentation slides from the talks are now available on the Health Information Technology website.