Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About PSR | Contact PSR | Feedback | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘General’ Category

NLM History of Medicine Lecture on April 6

On April 2, 1917, US President Woodrow Wilson asked Congress to declare war against Germany, stating that “The world must be made safe for democracy.” Four days later, on April 6, Congress voted overwhelmingly in favor of a war declaration. As part of the 2017 History of Medicine Lectures, the National Library of Medicine marks this important occasion with a forum spotlighting some of its rich collections related to the war and the American experience of the period, World War I Centenary Forum: Stories from the Collections of the National Library of Medicine. The session will be live-streamed globally on Thursday, April 6, 11:00am-12:30pm PDT through NIH Videocasting and will include a variety of stories drawn from these collections, shared by colleagues in the NLM’s History of Medicine Division.

Request for Comments on Proposals for Revision of the Standards for Maintaining, Collecting, and Presenting Federal Data on Race and Ethnicity

The Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Executive Office of the President, Office of Management and Budget (OMB), requests comments on the proposals that it has received from the Federal Interagency Working Group for Research on Race and Ethnicity for revisions to OMB’s Standards for Maintaining, Collecting, and Presenting Federal Data on Race and Ethnicity. Comments must be provided in writing to OMB no later than 60 days from the publication of the Federal Register Notice (published 3/1/2017).

NLM Mourns the Loss of Faye G. Abdellah, former Deputy Surgeon General and NLM Board of Regents member

Deputy Surgeon General Faye G. Abdellah, RN, MA, EdD, died on February 24, 2017, at the age of 97. Dr. Abdellah was a nurse, educator, and deputy surgeon general of the Public Health Service. She served as the U.S Surgeon General’s alternate ex-officio member of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine from 1972-1989. Her accomplishments include being the first nurse and woman to serve as Deputy Surgeon General of the United States (1981-1989), the highest ranked woman and nurse in the Federal Nursing Services when she achieved the rank of Rear Admiral, and the founder and first dean of the Graduate School of Nursing at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences.

As possibly the longest serving member of the NLM Board of Regents, Dr. Abdellah gave presentations that updated board members on many public health issues, including smoking, pediatric AIDS, and drunk driving. She contributed to Board policies that shaped NLM programs and services and to the NLM Long-Range Plan for 1986-2006. Dr. Abdellah was recognized internationally for her contributions to nursing research. She was known for creating a typology of 21 areas of focus for nurses, divided into three classes: physical, sociological and emotional needs of the patient; types of nurse-patient interpersonal relationships; and common elements of patient care. She advocated for nursing education to be research based, for nurses teaching self-care to patients, and an interdisciplinary approach to care.

Dr. Abdellah was adamant about the need for education based on science very early in her career. When she first taught nursing students at Yale University, she was so frustrated with the National League of Nursing guidelines because they had no scientific basis that she burned a stack of their curriculum guides in the Yale Courtyard. She told the Journal of Nursing Scholarship that it took her a year to pay for the books she burned. An obituary for Dr. Abdellah has been published.

NLM Board of Regents Welcomes Three New Members!

The National Library of Medicine Board of Regents welcomed three new members at its recent meeting:

  • Jane Blumenthal, MSLS, the associate university librarian for health sciences and director of the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. A past-president of the Medical Library Association, she has more than 30 years of experience in information and library services.
  • Eric Horvitz, MD, PhD, managing director and technical fellow at Microsoft Research. His research focuses on principles of machine intelligence and leveraging the complementarities of human and machine reasoning.
  • Gary Puckrein, PhD, executive director of the National Minority Quality Forum (NMQF), in Washington, DC. The NMQF strengthens efforts to use evidence-based, data-driven initiatives to eliminate premature death and preventable illness for racial and ethnic minorities and other special populations. Dr. Puckrein created and launched Minority Health Today, which served clinicians practicing in minority communities.

Submit Nominations for 2017 DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award by May 1!

The Friends of the National Library of Medicine are seeking nominations for this year’s Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award. All nominations must be received by May 1, 2017 via mail, fax, or email. Nominees must be currently employed as a health sciences librarian and have worked in such a position for at least five years immediately preceding the award. The nomination may be made for contributions by the librarian as demonstrated by excellence and achievement in leadership, publications, teaching, research, special projects or any combination of these. Self-nominations are accepted and encouraged. Nominations must be in writing and include the following elements:

  • The official nomination form
  • A precise description of the nominee’s achievements, no more than five pages
  • A current resume or curriculum vitae
  • Any additional information that would assist the jury in the evaluation of the nomination and selection of the recipient. Please include no more than ten extra pages.

NLM Announces Two New Digital Collections!

The National Library of Medicine has announced two additions to the NLM Digital Collections, the Library’s free online repository of biomedical resources including books, still images, videos, and maps.

Incunabula: A collection of books and broadsides printed in Europe before 1501 includes over forty items from the Library’s world-renowned collection of more than 580 incunabula on subjects relating to science and medicine, from printed classical works of Galen and Hippocrates to materials on the plague and other “pestilences.” Incunabula (from the Latin for “cradle”) are books and other materials produced with movable type on a printing press between the mid-1450s through the end of 1500 — the infancy of the age of printing. This digital collection will grow over time as the Library scans more incunabula titles.

World War 2, 1939-1949: A collection of U.S. government documents includes more than 1,500 federal, state, and local government publications. Among the variety of materials included are government reports, first aid manuals, informational pamphlets, and recruitment materials that demonstrate the efforts of government, military personnel, health professionals, and scientists, among others, on the home front and overseas during and immediately following the Second World War.

All of the content in NLM Digital Collections is freely available worldwide and, unless otherwise indicated, in the public domain. As with all printed materials added to the NLM Digital Collections, items from these new collections will also be included in the Internet Archive, and as part of the Medical Heritage Library through the ongoing collaboration with that international digital curation collaborative. More information about the content of these two new digital collections is available from the NLM History of Medicine Division Reference Desk.

100-Day Q&A with NLM Director Dr. Patti Brennan!

In the latest posting of the NLM in Focus newsletter, Dr. Patricia F. Brennan answered a wide range of questions regarding NLM, as well as her personal interests, as she approaches 100 days of service since her September 12 swearing-in ceremony. Not surprisingly, Dr. Brennan expresses a great deal of enthusiasm for data science initiatives. She also addresses progress and future plans for NLM’s strategic planning process, why she values communication with social media, and her plans for accomplishments in the next 900 days of her tenure as NLM director. It’s definitely worth checking out!

Call for Applications: 2017 Institute for Research Design in Librarianship

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) supports librarian researchers in the United States and has issued a call for applications for IRDL 2017. IRDL seeks librarians with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. Twenty librarians will receive, at no cost to them, instruction in research design and a full year of peer/mentor support to complete a research project at their home institutions. The year-long experience begins with a summer workshop on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, CA, from June 3 – June 11, 2017. The application deadline is January 13, 2017. Awards will be announced in early March 2017. Funding for participants is provided by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Loyola Marymount University.

To learn more about this program, check out the recording of the 75-minute informational webinar Librarian as Researcher: Emerging Roles, which featured presentations from four IRDL Scholars; Don Jason, Carolyn Schubert, Lisa Federer, and Electra Enslow.

New NLM Director’s Blog: Musings from the Mezzanine!

NLM-Musings Subscribe now to the newly launched blog, NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, and learn what’s on the mind of NLM Director Dr. Patti Brennan. In her initial post, Dr. Brennan reveals her first impressions of the Library and invites us to join her on this journey. The blog is the perfect space for two-way dialogue, so go ahead and share your thoughts and audacious ideas, as NLM enters its strategic planning cycle and prepares for its third century of existence! You can also follow Dr. Brennan on Twitter.

NLM Announces the Addition of the Louis Sokoloff Papers to Profiles in Science

Louis Sokoloff (1921-2015) was an American physician and neuroscientist whose innovative research methods and tools transformed the study of brain structure and function. During nearly six decades at the National Institute of Mental Health, he developed new experimental methods, combining techniques and mathematical descriptions from biochemistry, enzyme kinetics, and physiological studies to accurately measure cerebral blood flow and metabolism. Using radioactive 2-deoxyglucose tracers, he was able to make real-time images of living animal brains under various physiological conditions, showing which brain regions were most active at a given moment. This work, which definitively linked regional metabolic activity to particular brain functions, constituted a quantum leap for brain-mapping research. It was also rapidly adapted to positron emission tomography (PET) scanning technology, which soon became essential for studying and diagnosing brain disorders and many types of cancer. He received a Lasker Award in 1981 in recognition of this important “bench-to-bedside” translational research.

Now available from the National Library of Medicine is a selection from the papers of Dr. Sokoloff, on the National Library of Medicine’s Profiles in Science® Web site. Profiles in Science is a digital project of the Library that provides online access to archival collections of twentieth- and twenty-first century leaders in science, medicine, and public health. The Louis Sokoloff Papers Profiles in Science site features correspondence, published articles, interviews, and photographs from the Louis Sokoloff Papers held by NLM. Visitors to Profiles in Science can view, for example, photos from Sokoloff’s childhood and early career, correspondence with colleagues and students, and experimental brain images produced with the tracers he developed. An in-depth historical narrative leads to a wide range of primary source materials that provide a window into Sokoloff’s life and major contributions to neuroscience.  Visitors may also view a brief chronology of Sokoloff’s life, a glossary of terms specific to the collection, and a further readings page, as well as search and browse the collection.