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Archive for the ‘Funding’ Category

NIH Open Science Grand Prize Winner Announced!

A prototype online platform that uses real-time visualization and viral genome data to track the spread of global pathogens such as Zika and Ebola is the grand prize winner of the Open Science Prize. The international team competition is an initiative of the National Institutes of Health, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). The winning team, Real-time Evolutionary Tracking for Pathogen Surveillance and Epidemiological Investigation, created its nextstrain.org prototype to pool data from researchers across the globe, perform rapid phylogenetic analysis, and post the results on the platform’s website. The winning team will receive $230,000 to fully develop their prototype with NIH awarding $115,000 to the U.S. members of the winning team, and the Wellcome Trust and HHMI also contributing $115,000.

The Open Science Prize is a global competition designed to foster innovative solutions in public health and biomedicine using open digital content. The prize, which was launched in October 2015, aims to forge new international collaborations that bring together open science innovators to develop services and tools of benefit to the global research community. All six finalist teams were considered exemplary by the funders and are to be commended for their tenacity in developing creative approaches to applying publicly-accessible data to solve complex biomedical and public health challenges. The topics spanned the breadth of biomedical and public challenges, ranging from understanding the genetic basis of rare diseases, mapping the human brain, and enhancing the sharing of clinical trial information. As evidenced from the six Open Science Prize finalists, public health and biomedical solutions are enriched when data are combined from geographically diverse sources. Further details are available in the NIH Press Release.

New NLM Funding Opportunity for “Data Science Research: Personal Health Libraries for Consumers and Patients”

The National Library of Medicine seeks applications for novel informatics and data science approaches that can help individuals gather, manage and use data and information about their personal health. A goal of this program is to advance research and application by patients and the research community through broadly sharing the results via publication, and through open source mechanisms for data or resource sharing. To bring the benefits of big data research to consumers and patients, new biomedical informatics and data science approaches are needed, shaped to meet the needs of consumers and patients, whose health literacy, language skills, technical sophistication, education and cultural traditions affect how they find, understand and use personal health information. Data science approaches are needed to help individuals at every step, from harvesting to storing to using data and information in a personal health library.

Application deadlines are May 1, 2017, and March 19, 2018. Eligible applicants include higher education institutions, government entities, faith-based or community-based organizations, and other institutions. Applicants must base their proposed work on an informed profile of the intended users, and, the work should be developed through interaction with the user. The strongest projects will provide approaches that incorporate health data and information from more than one source, such as diagnostic images and links to full-text articles or genome sequence data linked to a family health history. An application should be centered on the problem area being addressed and the intended audience, propose a possible solution that employs novel data science or informatics, and undertake a pilot that will result in evidence of the degree of success and/or needed next steps. Applicants should expect to involve the intended users in their work. The number of awards will be contingent upon NIH appropriations and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. Up to $250,000 direct costs may be requested in any single year. The total project period may not exceed four years.

NIH Funding Opportunity: All of Us Research Program Engagement Partners

The National Institutes of Health has announced a new funding opportunity for organizations interested in helping engage volunteers in the All of Us Research Program, part of the Precision Medicine Initiative. This opportunity is open to national and regional organizations, as well as local community groups, and will support activities to promote enrollment and retention in the All of Us Research Program across diverse communities. All of Us is an ambitious effort to gather data over time from 1 million or more people living in the United States, with the ultimate goal of accelerating research and improving health. Unlike research studies that are focused on a specific disease or population, All of Us will serve as a national research resource to inform thousands of studies, covering a wide variety of health conditions. Researchers will use data from the program to learn more about how individual differences in lifestyle, environment and biological make-up can influence health and disease. By taking part, people will be able to learn more about their own health and contribute to an effort that will advance the health of generations to come. NIH plans to launch the program later this year.

Pending available funds, NIH is designating up to $5 million per year over the next three years to support these community-led outreach efforts, to complement the program’s existing research and engagement infrastructure. Eligible organizations include nonprofits, other community- and faith-based organizations, minority-serving institutions and local governments, among others. Applicants must submit their proposed strategy for helping educate community members or health care providers about All of Us, whether through special events, trainings, communication programs or other activities. Applicants must also include a funding proposal tied to specific outreach goals. In addition to conducting their engagement activities, awardees will provide input on program plans and share feedback about community needs. Applications are due on March 24, 2017, and NIH plans to issue awards in May 2017.

Submit Nominations for 2017 DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award by May 1!

The Friends of the National Library of Medicine are seeking nominations for this year’s Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award. All nominations must be received by May 1, 2017 via mail, fax, or email. Nominees must be currently employed as a health sciences librarian and have worked in such a position for at least five years immediately preceding the award. The nomination may be made for contributions by the librarian as demonstrated by excellence and achievement in leadership, publications, teaching, research, special projects or any combination of these. Self-nominations are accepted and encouraged. Nominations must be in writing and include the following elements:

  • The official nomination form
  • A precise description of the nominee’s achievements, no more than five pages
  • A current resume or curriculum vitae
  • Any additional information that would assist the jury in the evaluation of the nomination and selection of the recipient. Please include no more than ten extra pages.

NLM’s HSRProj Database Now Available for Download

NLM has announced that the Health Services Research Projects in Progress (HSRProj) database is available for download. HSRProj is produced by the National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR) and provides access to data for research into health services research investments. Established in the 1990s, HSRProj contains searchable structured descriptions of more than 16,000 current or recently completed health services research projects from more than 350 funders, both international and domestic. While access to the entire dataset of more 30,000 records has always been available on a partial or ad hoc basis, this new XML file download is expected to greatly broaden the accessibility of the information for those interested in health services research trends by topic, funder, or researcher/research organization.

Documentation for researchers seeking to manipulate and download the full file from the FTP site is available, including a complete list of all the elements and their attributes and a sample record using the NLM DTD, as well as a description of each field and its attributes. The XML data can be used with the XML converter of your choice. An updated file will be created and posted to the FTP site on a quarterly basis in conjunction with the regular quarterly update of the HSRProj record set. The current file is October 2016. NLM anticipates retaining older files on the FTP site for at least one year, but would welcome community input on this question. File names will include the month and date of release. No license is required to obtain or use the data. Per the Terms and Conditions, the National Library of Medicine should be identified as the creator, maintainer and provider of the data, for any use that is not personal; other conditions also apply.

NIH Funding Opportunity: NLM Admin Supplement for Informationist Services

The National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs), has published an Administrative Supplement funding opportunity available to eligible NIH awardees with active R01 grants and, in some cases, with other grant or cooperative agreement mechanisms. These administrative supplements provide funds to active awards of participating Institutes and Centers in order to enhance the storage, organization, management and use of digital research data through the involvement of informationists, also known as in-context information specialists.

The purposes of this administrative supplement program are (1) to enhance collaborative, multi-disciplinary basic and clinical research by integrating an information specialist into the research team in order to improve the capture, storage, organization, management, integration, presentation and dissemination of biomedical research data; and (2) to assess the impact of the informationist’s participation. Applications are due by March 15, 2017, by 5:00 PM local time of the applicant’s organization. Direct questions to Alan VanBiervliet, Ph.D., National Library of Medicine.

NLM Funding Opportunity: Information Resource Grants to Reduce Health Disparities

The National Library of Medicine has just issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) soliciting resource grant applications for projects that will bring useful, usable health information to health disparity populations and their health care providers. Access to useful, usable, understandable health information is an important factor during health decisions. Proposed projects should exploit the capabilities of computer and information technology and health sciences libraries to bring health-related information to consumers and their health care providers. Institutions with demonstrated commitment to the needs of health disparity communities (including Tribal Colleges and Universities, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and other institutions in rural and socially disadvantaged areas) are encouraged to apply. The application deadline is December 16, 2016.

NLM expects to commit $500,000 in Fiscal Year 2017 to fund up to five awards. The earliest expected project start date is July, 2017. Applicants may request up to three years for the project period. Budgets up to $100,000 for one year, $200,000 over two years or $300,000 over 3 years, in direct costs, may be requested. The total amount requested need not be the same in each year for a multiple year project, but needs to reflect actual needs of the proposed project. Facilities and administrative (F&A) costs, also called overhead or indirect costs, are not covered by this FOA.

Health Information Outreach Funding Opportunities from NLM and NIH

Do you know where to find grant and funding opportunities from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) related to health information outreach? The Outreach and Special Populations Branch (OSPB) of the National Library of Medicine provides a webpage with links for locating Information Outreach Funding Opportunities from NLM, NIH, and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM). Some examples of funding search resources include:

  • NLM Grants and Funding – Browse grants and funding opportunities under a number of categories, such as “Research Grants,” “Awards Supporting Career Development and Training,” “Support for Outreach Initiatives to Improve Access and Eliminate Health Disparities,” and “Trans NIH Programs and Initiatives Supported by NLM.”
  • NN/LM Funding Opportunities – Browse by region for funding opportunities from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.
  • NIH Funding Sources – Search or browse funding opportunities (published daily) from NIH, learn how to apply for grants, and explore previous NIH-funded research through NIH RePORT.

BD2K Funding Opportunity Announcement: Applications Due December 15

Notice has been issued for the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Enhancing the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Digital Curation for Biomedical Big Data (U01) Cooperative Agreement Funding Announcement. The purpose of this BD2K Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support the development, improvement and implementation of tools and approaches that increase the efficiency and effectiveness of digital curation processes used to characterize and describe the digital data used in or resulting from biomedical research. Potential topics to be addressed include:

  • Approaches that drive curation to become more standardized. For example, interfaces to assist in the assignment of metadata by proposing terms from accepted ontologies.
  • Tools and templates to facilitate consistent use of community-defined standards such as common data elements and standards used by archival resources such as GenBank, SRA, Biosample, etc.
  • Automated or semi-automated approaches to merging (harmonizing) disparate or heterogeneous data sets for purposes of new research.
  • Approaches that improve the speed and accuracy of extracting metadata information from text or other digital sources, and linking the information to a data set or other digital asset.
  • Approaches that support data annotation at points throughout the research lifecycle (data gathering, preparation of data for sharing, public sharing of data sets, submission or review of articles supported by data sets, etc.).
  • Approaches for distributed approaches to curation processes that increase the efficiency, completeness, accuracy or quality of the digital asset.
  • Approaches that apply curation earlier in the data generation life cycle, such as tools that ensure metadata for high through-put research data sets are accurately and consistently captured and transmitted with the data files.
  • Approaches that can be applied in more than one subject domain.

The opening submission date is November 15, with an application due date of December 15. The maximum project period is 4 years. Direct costs are limited to a maximum of $350,000 in each year. The earliest award state date is August, 2017. NIH intends to fund an estimate of 7-10 awards, corresponding to a total of $4 million, for fiscal year 2017.

BD2K Funding and Training Update

BD2K has announced the following new opportunities: