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Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Save the Date: 2016 Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lectureship on May 4!

The Annual NLM/MLA Joseph Leiter Memorial Lecture will be held this year on Wednesday, May 4, at 1:00pm ET (10:00am PDT) in the Lister Hill Auditorium at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, MD. The two-hour lecture was videocast and archived by NIH. In line with the traditional Leiter Lecture theme of fostering biomedical communication, this year’s lecturer is Jonna Mazet, DVM, MPVM, PhD, who will give the presentation Emerging Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century: A Prevention paradigm for surveillance, information sharing, & health diplomacy. Dr. Mazet is professor of epidemiology and disease ecology, and executive director of the One Health Institute, at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, where she focuses on global health problem solving, especially for emerging infectious disease and conservation challenges. Currently, she is Principal Investigator for “PREDICT – Wildlife SMART Surveillance for Zoonotic Diseases of Pandemic Potential,” a part of US Agency for International Development. Her specialty is studying diseases that could jump from an animal host population to a human population, such as SARS and Ebola. She will talk about the project and how to disseminate information to relevant agencies and groups to help prevent or minimize pandemic disease from such sources.

National Environmental Education Week: April 17-23

The National Environmental Education Act of 1990 established the National Environmental Education and Training Foundation (NEEF) as an independent non-profit organization complementary to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), extending its ability to foster environmental education for all ages and in all segments of the American public. NEEF’s 12th annual National Environmental Education Week (EE Week), Greening STEM: Rooted in Math, is scheduled for April 17-23, 2016 (Earth Day is April 22). It encourages and celebrates environmental learning through events and projects across the country. You can also register an event.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) provides resources related to toxicology, environmental health, and chemistry, most notably, TOXNET, an integrated database system of hazardous chemicals, toxic releases and environmental health. The Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), a component of TOXNET, has comprehensive, peer-reviewed toxicology data for more than 5,000 chemicals. TOXMAP uses United States maps to explore data from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and Superfund programs. The Haz-Map database contains information on the health effects of exposure to chemical and biological agents used in industry, on the job and at home.

Tox Town is a guide to toxic chemicals and environmental health issues in everyday locations. It is available in English and Spanish. The Household Products Database gives information on the potential health effects of chemicals contained in common products used inside and around the home. ToxMystery, available in English and Spanish, helps children ages 7 to 10 learn about toxic substances in the home. Tox Tutor and ToxLearn are written at the introductory college level and offer a basic introduction to toxicology.

National Public Health Week: April 4-10, 2016

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) salutes National Public Health Week, from April 4-10, 2016, an initiative of the American Public Health Association. NLM is working with PHPartners: Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce to promote their mission of helping the public health workforce find and use information effectively to improve and protect the public’s health.

The Outreach and Special Populations Branch of NLM provides a variety of reliable information resources to help improve public health information access, including:

For other health information resources directed towards specific populations, visit the NLM Outreach and Special Populations Branch homepage.

April is National Minority Health Month 2016!

On April 1 the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) launched the annual observance of National Minority Health Month. The theme this year, Accelerating Health Equity for the Nation, will promote the extraordinary efforts underway by HHS and the Obama Administration to reduce disparities, advance equity, and strengthen the health and well-being of all Americans. The OMH invites everyone across the nation to join together to raise awareness of the health disparities that continue to affect racial and ethnic minorities and to work together to accelerate health equity.

The observance of the 30th anniversary of the HHS Office of Minority Health will also begin during National Minority Health Month. Since its establishment in 1986, the OMH has served as the HHS lead agency for improving the health of racial and ethnic minority populations through the development of health policies and programs to help eliminate health disparities. On April 7 there will be a live broadcast of the HHS Equity Forum at 10:30 am PDT. Join OMH for the HHS Health Equity Forum webcast in observance of National Minority Health Month and the 30th anniversary of the HHS Office of Minority Health!

Applications Available for Office of Dietary Supplements Research Practicum June 7-9 at NIH Main Campus

The Office of Dietary Supplements is now accepting applications for the Mary Frances Picciano Dietary Supplement Research Practicum on June 7–9, 2016, to be held at the NIH main campus in Bethesda, MD. This three-day practicum will provide a thorough overview on the issues, concepts, unknowns, and controversies about dietary supplements and supplement ingredients. It will also emphasize the importance of scientific investigations to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and value of these products for health promotion and disease prevention as well as how to carry out this type of research. The application deadline is Monday, April 4. About 80 individuals will be selected to participate.

Early-Bird Registration and Travel Scholarships Now Available for National Diversity in Libraries Conference at UCLA in August!

Early registration is available for the National Diversity in Libraries Conference 2016 (NDLC ’16) through April 30 at the rate of $175. Save $50 off the regular rate! The student registration rate is $100. The meeting, co-sponsored by the UCLA Library and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), will take place on the UCLA campus August 10–13, 2016. The conference aims to articulate the value of and develop strategies for diversity and inclusion in the library, archive, and museum (LAM) fields in order to improve organizational excellence and community engagement. NDLC ’16 program and poster topics cover areas of diversity that affect staff, users, and institutions, including, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Collections and Access
  • Programming, Outreach, and Advocacy
  • Personnel, Management, and Organization
  • Challenging Topics

To learn more about the conference, check out the UCLA Library’s NDLC ’16 event page!

In addition, ARL has announced availability of up to five $1,000 scholarships for individuals to attend NDLC ’16. Funds from the scholarships may be used to cover the cost of registration, travel to and from the conference, lodging, and meals. Anyone interested in this opportunity must apply online by Friday, April 29. Successful applicants will be notified by June 6.

Registration Now Open for “Teaching & Learning in New Library Spaces” Symposium in Philadelphia on April 18!

Are you wondering what academic health sciences libraries will look like in the future? Have you been puzzling about how to fit new programs or neighbors into your existing library space? Are you contemplating a renovation project? Are you looking for ideas about how to spruce up some tired library areas? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then check out the full schedule, register, submit a lightning talk, and get all the details for the one-day symposium Teaching & Learning in New Library Spaces: The Changing Landscape of Health Sciences Libraries, to be held in Philadelphia on April 18, 2016! The meeting is being sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NN/LM MAR), the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region (NN/LM SE/A). Registration is free.

This is a great learning opportunity. But register soon, since space is limited!

Videocast: Reproducible Research: Many Dimensions and Shared Responsibilities

TITLE: Reproducible Research: Many Dimensions and Shared Responsibilities
DATE: Monday, March 14, 2016 – 11:30a – 1:30p (PDT)
VIDEOCAST: This workshop will be videocast.
INSTRUCTOR: Lisa Meier McShane, Ph.D., Chief, Biostatistics Branch, Biometric Research Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, National Cancer Institute
REGISTRATION: Not required.

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION: Biomedical researchers have an ethical responsibility to ensure the reproducibility and integrity of their work, so that precious research resources are not wasted and, most importantly, flawed or misleading results do not make their way to clinical studies where the faulty evidence could adversely affect study participants. Many factors have been suggested as contributors to irreproducible biomedical research, including poor study design, analytic instability of measurement methods, sloppy data handling, inappropriate and misleading statistical analysis methods, improper reporting or interpretation of results, and, on rare occasions, outright scientific misconduct. These problems can occur in any type of biomedical study, whether preclinical or clinical, large or small. Examples of the many potential pitfalls will be discussed along with suggested approaches to avoid them. The first half of the seminar will focus mainly on issues that arise commonly in preclinical and small clinical studies or studies performed retrospectively using stored biospecimens. The second half will elaborate on aspects that are particularly problematic in research involving the use of novel measurement technologies such as “omics assays” which generate large volumes of data and require specialized expertise and computational approaches for proper data analysis and interpretation. The discussions will emphasize the importance of including in a research team all individuals with the needed expertise as early as possible in a project in order to promote a sense of engagement and facilitate good communication across disciplines. Shared credit for scientific accomplishments should be understood as an acceptance of shared accountability for the integrity of the work.

This lecture is part of a full day of scheduled events and activities for the second annual NIH Pi Day, which celebrates the intersection between the quantitative and biomedical sciences. Pi Day is an annual international celebration of the irrational number Pi, 3.14…, on March 14. On Pi Day and every day, NIH recognizes the importance of building a diverse biomedical workforce with the quantitative skills required to tackle future challenges.

Resources for Aliso Canyon Natural Gas (Methane) Leak

Several local and state California agencies, as well as federal agencies, are responding to the natural gas leak at the Southern California Gas Company Aliso Canyon Facility that is affecting the Porter Ranch neighborhood in Los Angeles. The National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center (NLM Disaster Health) provides information on public health aspects of chemical incidents for the benefit of health professionals and volunteers who may be responding to an incident and for people living in or concerned about an affected region. The primary releases from the well are natural gas (methane) and odorants (tertiary butyl mercaptan and tetrahydrothiophene). The area is also being affected by “oily mist” containing assorted chemicals: benzene, toluene, ethylene, xylene, and other organics consistent with oil residues from the former oil drilling facility site. Air sampling has also noted radon and hydrogen sulfide.

A resource guide with a compilation of links on the gas leak and specific chemicals detected was prepared by NLM staff members Cindy Love, Siobhan Champ-Blackwell, and Stacey Arnesen. Contributions from NN/LM PSR staff were made by Kelli Ham, Lori Tagawa, and Alan Carr. A PDF version of the guide is also available.

Webinar on December 17: Affordable Care Act Messaging for American Indians and Alaska Natives

The Affordable Care Act offers many opportunities to American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) who lack health insurance coverage. The National Indian Health Board, American Indian Health & Family Services, and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium have many lessons learned to share from their past outreach and enrollment efforts related to enrollment under the Affordable Care Act. This webinar will provide tribes and tribal organizations with effective messaging strategies and outreach practices for AI/ANs that encourage enrollment in the Health Insurance Marketplace, Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

Moderator: Lillian Zuniga, Member, Cross-RHEC AI/AN Caucus

Speakers:

Dawn Coley, Director of Tribal Health Care Reform Outreach and Education, National Indian Health Board
Ashley Tuomi, DHSc, Executive Director, American Indian Health and Family Services
Charlene Walker, Director, Outreach and Enrollment, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

Date: December 17, 2015
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PST
Registration Link 
Full Abstract and Speaker Bios

The Cross-RHEC American Indian and Alaska Native Caucus is a group of Regional Health Equity Council (RHEC) members under the National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities (NPA). The Caucus provides a forum for RHEC members to increase dialogue across RHECs and to coordinate and enhance tribal, state and local efforts to address health disparities and the social determinants of health for AI/ANs.