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Archive for the ‘Education & Training’ Category

Applications Available for Office of Dietary Supplements Research Practicum June 7-9 at NIH Main Campus

The Office of Dietary Supplements is now accepting applications for the Mary Frances Picciano Dietary Supplement Research Practicum on June 7–9, 2016, to be held at the NIH main campus in Bethesda, MD. This three-day practicum will provide a thorough overview on the issues, concepts, unknowns, and controversies about dietary supplements and supplement ingredients. It will also emphasize the importance of scientific investigations to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and value of these products for health promotion and disease prevention as well as how to carry out this type of research. The application deadline is Monday, April 4. About 80 individuals will be selected to participate.

Early-Bird Registration and Travel Scholarships Now Available for National Diversity in Libraries Conference at UCLA in August!

Early registration is available for the National Diversity in Libraries Conference 2016 (NDLC ’16) through April 30 at the rate of $175. Save $50 off the regular rate! The student registration rate is $100. The meeting, co-sponsored by the UCLA Library and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), will take place on the UCLA campus August 10–13, 2016. The conference aims to articulate the value of and develop strategies for diversity and inclusion in the library, archive, and museum (LAM) fields in order to improve organizational excellence and community engagement. NDLC ’16 program and poster topics cover areas of diversity that affect staff, users, and institutions, including, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Collections and Access
  • Programming, Outreach, and Advocacy
  • Personnel, Management, and Organization
  • Challenging Topics

To learn more about the conference, check out the UCLA Library’s NDLC ’16 event page!

In addition, ARL has announced availability of up to five $1,000 scholarships for individuals to attend NDLC ’16. Funds from the scholarships may be used to cover the cost of registration, travel to and from the conference, lodging, and meals. Anyone interested in this opportunity must apply online by Friday, April 29. Successful applicants will be notified by June 6.

NLM Lends Books and Images to Jewish Museum of Maryland Exhibition

The National Library of Medicine has announced that selected items from its collection are included in a new exhibition, Beyond Chicken Soup: Jews and Medicine in America, which opened March 13, 2016, and will run through January 16, 2017, at the Jewish Museum of Maryland in Baltimore. Beyond Chicken Soup uncovers the often-overlooked cultural history embedded in a scientific enterprise. It probes questions important to all Americans: how do medical categories shape identity; what are the impacts of medical authority; where did our current health care institutions come from; and how does culture influence the medical construction of biological difference.

Focusing on the Jewish experience in the United States, Beyond Chicken Soup demonstrates how the field of medicine has been a vehicle, by turns, for discrimination, acculturation, and strengthening Jewish identity. The experiences of Jews, as both practitioners and patients, offer a case study in the formative impact of medicine on cultural and social identity, as well as the impact of cultural values on medicine.

Among the NLM collection items featured in Beyond Chicken Soup are:

  • Ma’aseh Tuviyah, [The Acts of Tobias], by Tobias Kats (1652?–1729), published in Italy, likely Venice, in 1708 and representing one of the earliest attempts to compare graphically the healthy human body to a well-functioning physical structure: in this case, a properly-run house;
  • Sefer otzar hahayim [Book of the Treasures of Life], by Jacob ben Isaac Zahalon (1630–1693), published in Venice in 1693, and
  • Ueber das Lehren und Lernen der medicinischen Wissenschaften an den Universitäten der deutschen Nation [On the teaching and learning of the medical sciences at the universities of the German nation], by the famous surgeon Theodor Billroth (1829–1894), published in Vienna in 1876.

NLM will also be providing the museum with selected images from its collection, including an image from Isaac ben Solomon’s Opera Omnia [Complete Works], published in 1515, and from the Zwerdling Collection of Postcards on the History of Nursing. NLM joins a number of prominent organizations in loaning items to the Jewish Museum of Maryland for this important exhibition, including the American Philosophical Society, National Library of Israel, and Peabody Museum of Archeology & Ethnology at Harvard Univeristy. NLM loans items from its history of medicine collections for display in public exhibitions to qualifying institutions on a case by case basis. Details about this loan program, and loans which the NLM has arranged since 2012, are available on the NLM web site.

Registration Now Open for “Teaching & Learning in New Library Spaces” Symposium in Philadelphia on April 18!

Are you wondering what academic health sciences libraries will look like in the future? Have you been puzzling about how to fit new programs or neighbors into your existing library space? Are you contemplating a renovation project? Are you looking for ideas about how to spruce up some tired library areas? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then check out the full schedule, register, submit a lightning talk, and get all the details for the one-day symposium Teaching & Learning in New Library Spaces: The Changing Landscape of Health Sciences Libraries, to be held in Philadelphia on April 18, 2016! The meeting is being sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NN/LM MAR), the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region (NN/LM SE/A). Registration is free.

This is a great learning opportunity. But register soon, since space is limited!

Videocast: Reproducible Research: Many Dimensions and Shared Responsibilities

TITLE: Reproducible Research: Many Dimensions and Shared Responsibilities
DATE: Monday, March 14, 2016 – 11:30a – 1:30p (PDT)
VIDEOCAST: This workshop will be videocast.
INSTRUCTOR: Lisa Meier McShane, Ph.D., Chief, Biostatistics Branch, Biometric Research Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, National Cancer Institute
REGISTRATION: Not required.

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION: Biomedical researchers have an ethical responsibility to ensure the reproducibility and integrity of their work, so that precious research resources are not wasted and, most importantly, flawed or misleading results do not make their way to clinical studies where the faulty evidence could adversely affect study participants. Many factors have been suggested as contributors to irreproducible biomedical research, including poor study design, analytic instability of measurement methods, sloppy data handling, inappropriate and misleading statistical analysis methods, improper reporting or interpretation of results, and, on rare occasions, outright scientific misconduct. These problems can occur in any type of biomedical study, whether preclinical or clinical, large or small. Examples of the many potential pitfalls will be discussed along with suggested approaches to avoid them. The first half of the seminar will focus mainly on issues that arise commonly in preclinical and small clinical studies or studies performed retrospectively using stored biospecimens. The second half will elaborate on aspects that are particularly problematic in research involving the use of novel measurement technologies such as “omics assays” which generate large volumes of data and require specialized expertise and computational approaches for proper data analysis and interpretation. The discussions will emphasize the importance of including in a research team all individuals with the needed expertise as early as possible in a project in order to promote a sense of engagement and facilitate good communication across disciplines. Shared credit for scientific accomplishments should be understood as an acceptance of shared accountability for the integrity of the work.

This lecture is part of a full day of scheduled events and activities for the second annual NIH Pi Day, which celebrates the intersection between the quantitative and biomedical sciences. Pi Day is an annual international celebration of the irrational number Pi, 3.14…, on March 14. On Pi Day and every day, NIH recognizes the importance of building a diverse biomedical workforce with the quantitative skills required to tackle future challenges.

UC Berkeley Hosting ACRL Roadshow Workshop “Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement!” on March 24

The ACRL Roadshow Workshop, Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement! will be offered on Thursday, March 24, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm, at the Toll Room, Alumni House, on the UC Berkeley campus. Registration is free and limited to 100 participants. The session is directed towards librarians and library staff who need a broad foundational knowledge of scholarly communication issues. Participants will learn about and discuss content access barriers, intellectual property, emerging opportunities, and engagement with faculty and students. Attendees will leave with practical ideas for developing outreach activities and models for supporting changes in scholarly communication. The two presenters for this workshop will be Katie Fortney, Copyright Policy & Education Officer, California Digital Library, and Jaron Porciello, Digital Scholarship Initiatives Coordinator, Digital Scholarship and Preservation Services, Cornell University.

The Alumni House is a short distance from the Downtown Berkeley BART stationParking around campus is limited and taking public transportation is recommended. For inquiries regarding the workshop, please contact Jean McKenzie, UC Berkeley Acting Associate University Librarian for Collections.

Registration Available for NTC Online Class “Discovering TOXNET” March 7 – April 6

Sign up now for the Spring session of Discovering Toxnet, a four-week online Moodle class conducted by the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) March 7 through April 6. The course provides an introduction to TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises. The purpose of this class is to enhance familiarity with reliable environmental health and toxicology information from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources. Skills and knowledge acquired from this course will enable attendees to access, utilize and refer others to online environmental and toxicology information.

Forum on March 7: Using Data to Improve Clinical Patient Outcomes

On March 7 the NN/LM Pacific Northwest (PNR) and MidContinental (MCR) Regions are co-sponsoring a forum that will provide an overview of current and potential uses of patient data to improve patient safety, quality of care and evidence-based practice, Using Data to Improve Clinical Patient Outcomes. The event will be live streamed, linking presenters and participants in videoconference studios located at the University of Washington in Seattle and University of Utah in Salt Lake City. Librarian participants will have the opportunity to explore how they can contribute to the use of clinical data as evidence and what skills they can develop to support health care organizations in the use of data. Online or in-person attendance options are available. Registration is free, but required. The session will be archived, and a captioned recording will be made available within a few weeks of the event.

In preparation for this forum, both Regions are offering Data Curation / Management Journal Clubs, using both the MLA’s Discussion Group Program structure along with the new PubMed Commons Journal Clubs (PCJC) structure. Look forward to their analysis of recent data curation/management articles in the Plains to Peaks and Dragonfly newsletters!

Upcoming NCBI Webinars: Sequence Read Archive (SRA) and Resources for Cancer Research

Five ways to submit next-gen sequence data to NCBI’s Sequence Read Archive (SRA)
Wed, February 17, 2016, 10:00-11:00 am PT
In this webinar you will learn how to use five different ways to submit your next gen sequence data to NCBI’s Sequence Read Archive. These include external submission services through Illumina’s BaseSpace, MOTHUR (for microbial ecology data) and the iPlant Collaborative. In addition NCBI provides the new SRA submission portal and soon will offer the ability to upload data to SRA through FTP and the Aspera command line client in the new submission portal.

NCBI resources for cancer research
Wed, March 2, 2016, 10:00-11:00 am PT
This workshop provides an overview of NCBI molecular resources for cancer researchers. In the first part of the webinar you will learn to more effectively use the Entrez text-based search system and the BLAST sequence similarity search tool to find data relevant to cancer research including sequence, variation, gene and expression information. The second part of the presentation will focus on accessing large-scale genomics datasets. You will learn how to search for, access and download DNA-seq, RNA-seq, Epigenomics and Metagenomics datasets and how to access the tools and APIs at NCBI that can be used to extract relevant subsets of that data for cancer research.

National Library of Medicine Announces MedPix®, Free Online Medical Image Database

MedPix Home Page – NLM’s Medical Image DatabaseThe National Library of Medicine has announced the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, MD. The MedPix collection categorizes and classifies the image and patient data for each of several subsets of image database applications (e.g. radiology, pathology, ophthalmology, etc.). The content material is both high-quality and high-yield and includes both common and rare conditions. Most cases have a proven diagnosis (pathology, clinical follow-up). The teaching file cases are peer-reviewed by an Editorial Panel. The primary target audience includes resident and practicing physicians, medical students, nurses and graduate nursing students and other post-graduate trainees. The material is organized by disease category, disease location (organ system), and by patient profiles.

The foundation for MedPix was a radiology study tool that was originally developed by Dr. J.G. Smirniotopoulos in 1984. In the early 1990s, as radiology was moving from film to digital imaging, there was simultaneously a merger of the diagnostic imaging residency programs of the two premier military hospitals: Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center. In the summer of 1999, a Web-based digital teaching file based on the radiology study tool was built at USUHS to allow the two military training programs to share teaching file cases, a training requirement. Soon, other military hospitals and several civilian institutions joined MedPix. Over the past 16 years, MedPix has amassed an impressive collection of over 53,000 images from over 13,000 cases. Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Nurse Education (CNE) were added to the MedPix system in 2001.

As a public education service, the NLM and MedPix provide the storage service, indexing, and Web server hosting. Individuals as well as institutions may participate. Contributed content may be copyrighted by the original author/contributor. No additional software is required; an Internet browser is all you need!