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Archive for the ‘Education & Training’ Category

2016 Association of Health Care Journalists–NLM Journalism Fellows Announced

The 2016 Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ)-National Library of Medicine (NLM) Fellows class features seven reporters and editors representing diverse media backgrounds.

The 2016 AHCJ-NLM Fellows are:

Now in its eighth year, the program brings journalists selected by AHCJ to NLM for four days of training to better use some of NLM’s health information resources, such as PubMed, PubMed Health, Genetics Home Reference, TOXMAP,, and MedlinePlus. This year’s Fellows class will be at NLM September 26-30. AHCJ is an independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing public understanding of health care issues. With more than 1,500 members, AHCJ’s mission is to improve the quality, accuracy and visibility of health care reporting, writing and editing. The association and its Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism are based at the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism.

Weekly Webinar Series Begins September 9: “The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science”

The NIH Big Data to Knowledge program has announced a new weekly webinar series beginning Friday, September 9, The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science. The sessions will consist of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. The series will run through May 19, 2017, at 9:00-10:00 AM Pacific Time. Join from your computer, tablet, or smartphone by visiting: You may also dial in using your phone: (872) 240-3311, Access Code 786-506-213. Registration is not required. Bookmark the webinar link for easy access! All presentations will be archived and available on the course YouTube channel.

This is a joint effort of the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2KCCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. The initial set of confirmed data science lecturers includes: Mark Musen (Stanford), William Hersh (Oregon Health Sciences), Lucila Ohno-Machado (UCSD), Michel Dumontier (Stanford), Zachary Ives (Penn), Suzanne Sansone (Oxford), Chaitan Baru (NSF), Brian Caffo (Johns Hopkins), and Naomi Elhadad (Columbia).

NLM Outreach Program Spotlight: Environmental Health Information Partnership (EnHIP)

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Environmental Health Information Partnership (EnHIP) is a collaboration between NLM and Historically Black Colleges and Universities, a Predominately Black Institution, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and an Alaska Native-Serving Institution. A list of EnHIP Member Schools is available, as well as the March 2016 EnHIP Meeting Proceedings. The mission of the EnHIP is to enhance the capacity of minority serving academic institutions to reduce health disparities through the access, use and delivery of environmental health information on their campuses and in their communities. Two member schools are based in the Pacific Southwest Region; Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles, and Diné College, with various locations in Arizona and New Mexico.

EnHIP began as a pilot project in 1991 as the Toxicology Information Outreach Project (TIOP). During the late 1980s and early 1990s, there were a number of published articles and books that highlighted the adverse effects of environmental hazards on minority and socioeconomically deprived communities. There was a clear need for toxicology and environmental health information to be more readily accessible to health professionals serving these communities. Recognizing this need, NLM launched TIOP to strengthen the capacity of Historically Black Colleges and Universities to train medical and other health professionals in the use of toxicology, environmental, occupational, and hazardous waste information resources. The value and success of the project later led to the longest-standing outreach program of NLM. The name was changed to the Environmental Health Information Outreach Program (EnHIOP) as more schools were added to the program in order to reflect more diversity in the participating institutions. In 2008, the name changed to Environmental Health Information Partnership (EnHIP) to reflect a true partnership with NLM.

Research Intelligence Conference in Berkeley September 29

Elsevier is sponsoring the inaugural North America Research Intelligence Conference, which will take place at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Berkeley Marina on Thursday, September 29. The conference theme is Enabling Data-informed Strategic Planning for the Research Enterprise. Registration for the conference is free of charge and includes access to every session. Breakfast, lunch, and refreshments will be provided during the day. There is also a Networking Reception on Wednesday, September 28.

Sign Up to Pilot Test Research Data Management Education Modules!

Kevin Reed and Alisa Surkis, NYU School of Medicine, are seeking participants to pilot test research data management education materials for medical librarians. This project is currently funded by a grant from the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative at NIH to develop a curriculum for medical librarians to facilitate their teaching research data management at their own institutions. The training modules are open to all librarians, regardless of skill set. There are two components to the training materials:

Part 1: Seven online modules (approximately three hours of content) designed to teach medical librarians about the practice and culture of research and best practices in research data management.

Part 2: A teaching toolkit including slides, scripts, and evaluation materials to teach an in-person introductory research data management class for researchers at your institution.

Kevin and Alisa are currently seeking participants to pilot part 1. Following that, they will seek out a subset of participants to pilot part 2, which will involve structured observations of classes taught by the librarians at their institutions. All participants in piloting part 1 will be given access to the materials in part 2, regardless of whether or not they are part of the piloting of those materials.

Kevin and Alisa have been teaching research data management to medical librarians at the past three MLA annual meetings, based on their experiences in providing research data management services at NYU School of Medicine. Hopefully, the materials created for this project will make the core elements of that class more broadly available to facilitate the teaching of research data management at medical libraries across the United States. Anyone intending to take the modules should contact Kevin or Alisa to confirm participation. There’s no need to wait for a reply to begin taking the modules. They are available to answer questions at any time.

BD2K Funding and Training Update

BD2K has announced the following new opportunities:

NLM Conference on Best Practices to Achieve Reproducible Research Now Available Online!

Proceedings of the two-day Best Practices of Biomedical Research: Improving Reproducibility and Transparency of Preclinical Research conference, held June 9-10, 2016, are now available for viewing through the NIH VideoCasting site:

Reproducibility of biomedical research, which is the ability to conduct projects that lead to the same results multiple times, was the focus of this conference featuring the nation’s leading experts, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine, the Friends of the National Library of Medicine, and Research!America. Discussions included insights from Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Robert Califf, as well as presentations by John Ioannidis, MD, Professor of Medicine and Health Research and Policy, Stanford University; Christopher Austin, MD, Director, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH; and Jon R. Lorsch, PhD, Director, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH.

Topics covered in the conference include:

  • The challenge of reproducibility
  • Due diligence in acquiring science
  • Ethics and institutional responsibility
  • Open science and data sharing
  • Scientific rigor and open science
  • Best strategies for reproducible research
  • Best practices of reproducible research

July Midday at the Oasis Recording Now Available!

On July 20, NN/LM PSR presented EPAs? Entrustable Professional Activities for the Midday at the Oasis monthly webinar. Rikke Ogawa, Team Leader for Research, Instruction, and Collection Services, UCLA Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library, provided an overview of EPAs and discussed opportunities for medical librarians in pursuing engagement with the medical education community. You can view the webinar by visiting our Midday at the Oasis Archives page or by clicking on the YouTube video player below.

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Note: To switch to full screen, click on the full screen icon in the bottom corner of the video player. To exit the full screen, press Esc on your keyboard or click on the Full screen icon again. If you have problems viewing full screen videos, make sure you have the most up-to-date version of Adobe Flash Player.

2016 DailyMed/RxNorm Jamboree Workshop on September 27

The National Library of Medicine is hosting the fourth annual DailyMed/RxNorm Jamboree Workshop on Tuesday, September 27, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm EDT. Speakers from the Federal government, industry, pharmacy standards groups, and others will present. The emphasis is on practical and novel ways to use and understand free drug information, which is produced and consumed by a number of Federal agencies.

The Jamboree is a free public meeting, but registration is required. The proceedings are archived on NIH Videocasting.

NCBI Web Pages Will Transition to HTTPS Protocol on September 30, 2016

To comply with new government-wide security standards, all NCBI Web pages and API services will switch to the secure HTTPS protocol on September 30. At that time, when you visit NCBI web pages, you will see a green lock and https:// in the address bar instead of http://. This lets you know that you are really on an NCBI page; that the server identity is confirmed and that communication with the server is encrypted and private. General users of NCBI web pages need not update or change anything. You don’t need to clear your cache or update any links to NCBI pages that you’ve put on your own webpages or shared with anyone. All pages will automatically redirect to https://.

To help users transition smoothly with this change, registration is available for the 15-minute NCBI Minute webinar Important Changes to NCBI Web Protocols, on Wednesday, July 27, at 9:00 AM PDT. The session will cover details about how this change will affect access to NCBI pages and services. After the live presentation, the webinar will be archived on the NCBI YouTube channel for future viewing.