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Archive for the ‘Education & Training’ Category

Save the Date: Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians, April 24-28, 2017, in Raleigh, NC!

The Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians will be held April 24-28, 2017 at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library, North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. Applications for the Institute will be accepted beginning December 12, 2016.

The Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians is a week-long course providing the opportunity for librarians passionate about research and scholarship to immerse themselves in learning about data science and visualization in collaboration with academic peers. Participants will develop knowledge, skills, and confidence to communicate effectively with faculty and student researchers about their data and be able to provide initial consultancy on the course topics. Led by expert instructors, sessions will be interactive and will focus on mastery of core concepts, with hands-on exposure to select open source and highly used commercial tools. Sharing of practices and experiences across institutions will be encouraged. A final schedule will be available in December, including topics such as:

  • Data Exploration and Statistical Analysis
  • Bibliometric Analysis
  • Data Visualization
  • Version Control with Git and GitHub
  • Data Description, Sharing, and Reuse
  • Data Cleaning and Preparation
  • Web Scraping
  • Analyzing Textual Data
  • Mapping and Geospatial Visualization
  • Publisher and Funder Data Use Agreements

Newly Revised, Web-Based NLM Disaster Information Specialization Courses Available!

The NLM Basic Level Courses for the Medical Library Association Disaster Information Specialization have all been updated to a new online web-based tutorial format. The courses are self-paced, interactive, and offered at no cost. Anyone completing all 15 hours of the courses is eligible to earn a Basic Level certificate in Disaster Information Specialization from MLA. The Basic Level courses include three from NLM Disaster Health:

  • Disaster Health Information Sources: The Basics
    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the essential resources needed to provide health-related information services for supporting disaster mitigation, planning, response, and recovery.
  • U.S. Response to Disasters and Public Health Emergencies
    This course provides an introduction to disaster/emergency planning and response as conducted in the United States, with an emphasis on medical response.
  • Information Roles in Disaster Management
    This course presents current research findings on librarians’ roles supporting the disaster workforce. Additionally, the information needs of first responders, emergency managers, and other professionals working in the areas of disaster planning, response, and recovery are discussed.

Two additional courses are available online, at no cost, from the FEMA Emergency Management Institute:

  • IS-700.A National Incident Management System (NIMS) An Introduction
    This course introduces and provides an overview of the National Incident Management System (NIMS). NIMS provides a consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together during domestic incidents.
  • IS-100.B Introduction to Incident Command System, ICS-100
    This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System (ICS). ICS is a standardized approach to incident management that enables a coordinated response among various jurisdictions and agencies; establishes common processes for planning and managing resources; and allows for the integration of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure.

Register Now for 2017 Sessions of the “PubMed for Librarians” Webinar Series!

Registration is now open for the next round of the highly popular PubMed For Librarians webinar series, offered by the NN/LM Training Office. The class is divided into six segments (90 minutes each). Each segment is a synchronous online session that includes hands-on exercises and is worth 1.5 hours of MLA CE credit. Participants can choose any or all of the six segments that are of interest. The segments are as follows:

  • Introduction to PubMed: Learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a PubMed search, assess your search retrieval, analyze search details, employ three ways to search for a known citation, and how to customize with My NCBI.
  • MeSH (Medical Subject Headings): Learn about the NLM Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database. Explore the four different types of MeSH terms and how searchers can benefit from using MeSH to build a search. Investigate the structure of the MeSH database and look at the components of a MeSH record.
  • Automatic Term Mapping (ATM): Learn about Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) – the process that maps keywords from your PubMed search to the controlled vocabulary of the MeSH database. Learn why searching with keywords in PubMed can be an effective approach to searching. Look at the explosion feature, what is and is not included in search details, and explore how PubMed processes phrases.
  • Building and Refining Your Search: Use some of the tools and features built into PubMed that are designed to help you search more effectively. Explore the filters sidebar and Topic-Specific Queries. Use History, tools in the NLM Catalog, and the Advanced Search Builder to build searches and explore topics.
  • Using Evidence-Based Search Features: Explore terminology used for indexing study design in PubMed, explore three PubMed products that facilitate evidence based searching, and learn how to customize My NCBI Filters to quickly locate specific publication types.
  • Customization – My NCBI: Learn about the advantages of creating a My NCBI account, managing and manipulating your My NCBI page content, locating and identifying available filters on PubMed’s filter sidebar, selecting and setting up to fifteen filters, and creating a custom filter.

Call for Applications: 2017 Institute for Research Design in Librarianship

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) supports librarian researchers in the United States and has issued a call for applications for IRDL 2017. IRDL seeks librarians with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. Twenty librarians will receive, at no cost to them, instruction in research design and a full year of peer/mentor support to complete a research project at their home institutions. The year-long experience begins with a summer workshop on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, CA, from June 3 – June 11, 2017. The application deadline is January 13, 2017. Awards will be announced in early March 2017. Funding for participants is provided by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Loyola Marymount University.

To learn more about this program, register for the 75-minute informational webinar Librarian as Researcher: Emerging Roles, on Monday, December 12, at 10:00 AM PST. The session will feature presentations from four IRDL Scholars; Don Jason, Carolyn Schubert, Lisa Federer, and Electra Enslow.

Free Webinar on November 29: Best Practices for Social Media Accessibility

Registration is available for the next session in the Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series, Getting Social: Best Practices for Social Media Accessibility, on November 29, from 10:00 to 11:30 AM PST. It will provide helpful tips and practices to ensure that your agency’s social media content attracts the largest possible audience while being accessible to individuals with disabilities. Presenters will review best practices for preparing and deploying social media that is accessible to all citizens. They also will provide an overview of the Federal Social Media Accessibility Toolkit, a key accessibility resource developed by the ePolicyWorks team in the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy that offers tips to improve the accessibility of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and blogs. Featured speakers include Hope Adler, ePolicyWorks, Communications Project Manager; Emily Ladau, ePolicyWorks, Communications Consultant; and Timothy P. Creagan, Senior Accessibility Specialist, U.S. Access Board (moderator).

Twitter Chat on November 16 for National Family Caregivers Month

November is National Family Caregivers Month, and you can attend the #FindCareInfo Twitter chat on November 16, 10:00-11:00 am PST to raise awareness about the often overlooked health information needs of family caregivers. The Outreach and Special Populations Branch of the National Library of Medicine is hosting this chat through @NLM_4Caregivers, and special co-hosts include NIH ADEAR Center, the National Alliance for Caregiving, and the Caregiver Action Network. This Twitter chat will:

  • Identify what type of health information is most needed by family caregivers.
  • Raise awareness of health topics important to family caregivers.
  • Share health information resources useful to family caregivers.

If you are a family caregiver, know a family caregiver, or work with family caregivers, then you can help to raise awareness and share reliable health information resources for caregivers at the #FindCareInfo Twitter chat.

New Web-Based Broadband Health Mapping Tool!

The Federal Communications Commission’s Connect2Health Task Force recently launched the Mapping Broadband Health in America tool, a web-based mapping tool that enables more efficient, data-driven decision making at the intersection of broadband and health. By allowing users to ask and answer questions about broadband and health at the county and census block levels, the tool provides critical data that can help drive broadband health policies and connected health solutions for this critical space. The mapping tool is an interactive experience, showing various aspects of connectivity and health for every state and county in the United States. Users can generate customized maps that display broadband access, adoption and speed data alongside various health measures (e.g., obesity, diabetes, disabilities and physician access) in urban and rural areas. These maps can be used by both public and private sectors and local communities to identify not only gaps, but also opportunities. Also released with the mapping platform are the Priority 100 and Rural 100 lists, identifying counties that have critical needs in broadband and health. Priority 100 is a list of the 100 counties nationwide with the greatest broadband and connectivity needs and populations of at least 25,000. Rural 100 is similar to Priority 100, but only includes rural areas with a population of 15,000 or more. Additional information is available in the Press Kit.

On November 10, 11:00am-12:00pm PST, the FCC’s Connect2Health Task Force and the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau’s Office of Intergovernmental Affairs will jointly host a free webinar to further explain and explore this new tool, Mapping Connected Health County by County. The session will focus on how state and local government offices, agencies and other local community stakeholders can effectively use the Mapping Broadband Health in America platform. Key audiences for the webinar include federal, state and local agencies and offices that address health, connectivity, technology and/or rural development; such as county health departments, public health officers and epidemiologists, broadband and technology officers, data analytics and GIS teams, and community health workers and strategists.

New Three-Part NLM Webinar Series Begins November 30, “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”

On November 30, December 7, and December 14, the National Library of Medicine will present the three-part Webinar series Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed. This series of workshops will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of three 90-minute sessions, participants will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome! Registration will be limited to 50 students per offering. Participants are expected to attend all sessions in a single series:

  • Part 1: Getting PubMed Data: Wednesday, November 30, 10:00 – 11:30 AM PST
  • Part 2: Extracting Data from XML: Wednesday, December 7, 10:00 – 11:30 AM PST
  • Part 3: Building Practical Solutions: Wednesday, December 14, 10:00 – 11:30 AM PST

The entire series will be offered again in January/February 2017. All classes involve hands-on demonstrations and exercises. Before registering for these classes, NLM strongly recommends completion of the following activities:

  • Watch the first Insider’s Guide class “Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed,” or be familiar with the basic concepts of APIs and E-utilities.
  • Be familiar with structured XML data (basic syntax, elements, attributes, etc.)
  • Have access to a Unix command-line environment on your computer. For more information, visit the Installing EDirect page.
  • Install the EDirect software. For more information, visit the EDirect installation page.

Open Data Science Symposium: Webcast Available on December 1

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative and the Office of the Associate Director for Data Science (ADDS) are hosting an Open Data Science Symposium on December 1, from 8:30am – 4:00pm EST. The session will feature discussions with the leaders in big data, open science, and biomedical research while also showcasing the finalists of the Open Science Prize, a worldwide competition to harness the innovative power of open data. Speakers will include Francis Collins, NIH Director; Harold Varmus, Former NIH Director; John Wilbanks, Sage Bionetworks Chief Commons Officer; Peter Goodhand, Global Alliance for Genomics and Health Executive Director; and Niklas Blomberg, Founding Director of Elixir. The event is freely available to the public and will be webcast. Advance registration is required, with a deadline of November 18. Webcasting information will be available on the registration site. For additional information about the event, contact BD2K_events@od.nih.gov.

Registration Now Open for the 9th International Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Conference June 18-21 in Philadelphia

Registration is now open for EBLIP9, the 9th International Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Conference June 18-21, 2017 in Philadelphia, with the theme Embedding and Embracing Evidence. The early bird registration rate of $480 ($300 for students) is available through February 28. Full conference pricing includes snacks throughout the conference, three lunches, an opening night reception, and second night conference banquet dinner in addition to keynotes, program sessions, and poster sessions. The Call for Papers and Posters is open through November 15. Pre-conference workshops are priced separately; information on these sessions is coming soon!