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Archive for the ‘Announcements’ Category

NIH Funding Opportunity: NLM Admin Supplement for Informationist Services

The National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs), has published an Administrative Supplement funding opportunity available to eligible NIH awardees with active R01 grants and, in some cases, with other grant or cooperative agreement mechanisms. These administrative supplements provide funds to active awards of participating Institutes and Centers in order to enhance the storage, organization, management and use of digital research data through the involvement of informationists, also known as in-context information specialists.

The purposes of this administrative supplement program are (1) to enhance collaborative, multi-disciplinary basic and clinical research by integrating an information specialist into the research team in order to improve the capture, storage, organization, management, integration, presentation and dissemination of biomedical research data; and (2) to assess the impact of the informationist’s participation. Applications are due by March 15, 2017, by 5:00 PM local time of the applicant’s organization. Direct questions to Alan VanBiervliet, Ph.D., National Library of Medicine.

NNLM Webinar on January 12: What is Bioinformatics Librarianship?

A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: Serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information. Register now for this one-hour webinar on January 12, 2017, 10:00-11:00 AM PST, and meet eight of your colleagues as they explain their specialized and valuable roles at their institutions:

  • Julie A Arendt, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Marci Brandenburg, University of Michigan
  • Rolando Garcia-Milan, Yale University
  • Karen H Gau, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Tobin Magle, Colorado State University
  • Robyn Reed, Penn State University
  • Elliott Smith, University of California, Berkeley
  • Rob Wright, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Following the webinar, you will be invited to participate in a focus group to help the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) design bioinformatics education for librarians who serve biomedical researchers and practitioners, as well as those who serve a broader audience. This session is sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Training Office and the NNLM Bioinformatics Education Working Group. It will be moderated by Peter Cooper, NCBI, and Kate Majewski, NLM.

New Human Genome Resources Portal: A Site for Exploration of the Human Genome

The new Human Genome Resources portal offers access to visualization and analysis tools available for the human genome, as well as other relevant tools like BLAST, the NCBI Genome Remapping Service, and databases that provide human molecular data. The extensive listing of learning resources is sorted into the categories of Find, View, Download, and Learn, and is designed to provide a better understanding of the wealth of information associated with the human genome. Specific goals that can be accomplished by using the site include:

Response Deadline Extended for NIH RFI for Data Management Activities

The National Institutes of Health has issued the Request for Information (RFI), Strategies for NIH Data Management, Sharing, and Citation, to seek public comments on data management and sharing strategies and priorities in order to consider: (1) how digital scientific data generated from NIH-funded research should be managed, and to the fullest extent possible, made publicly available; and, (2) how to set standards for citing shared data and software. The new response date deadline is January 19, 2017.

Comments should be submitted electronically. Response to the RFI is voluntary. Responders are free to address any or all of the items in Sections I and II, listed below, or any other relevant topics respondents recognize as important for NIH to consider. Respondents should not feel compelled to address all items.

  • Section I. Data Sharing Strategy Development
  • Section II. Inclusion of Data and Software Citation in NIH Research Performance Progress Reports (RPPR) and Grant Applications

NIH will consider all public comments before taking next steps. No proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should be included in responses. Comments will be compiled and shared publicly in an unedited version after the close of the comment period. The NIH may use information gathered by this RFI to inform development of future funding opportunity announcements and policy development. Additional information about the importance of this RFI is available in a new blog posting, The What and How of Data Sharing, published by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz, NIH Associate Director for Science Policy.

2017 MEDLINE Data Changes

MeSH vocabulary has been updated for 2017. The MeSH Browser currently points to the 2017 MeSH vocabulary with a link to the 2016 MeSH Vocabulary. Searchers should consult the Browser to find MeSH headings of interest and their relationships to other headings. The Browser contains MeSH heading records that may include Scope Notes, Annotations, Entry Terms, History Notes, Allowable Qualifiers (Subheadings), Previous Indexing, and other information. It also includes Subheading records and Supplementary Concept Records (SCRs) for substances and diseases that are not MeSH headings. MEDLINE records with updated MeSH are anticipated to be in PubMed in mid-December 2016. This year 77 MeSH headings were either changed or deleted and replaced with more up-to-date terminology, and 629 new MeSH headings, including two new Publication Types, were added to MeSH in 2017. In order to improve indexing consistency and efficiency and to make MEDLINE searching easier and more straightforward, a new subheading, “diagnostic imaging,” was added. It replaces three existing subheadings; “radiography,” “radionuclide imaging,” and “ultrasonography.” For an overview of the many other 2017 MEDLINE data changes, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Apply Now for Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians, April 24-28, 2017, in Raleigh, NC!

Applications are being accepted through January 27 for the Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians, to be held April 24-28, 2017 at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library, North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance status no later than February 17, 2017.

The Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians is a week-long course providing the opportunity for librarians passionate about research and scholarship to immerse themselves in learning about data science and visualization in collaboration with academic peers. Participants will develop knowledge, skills, and confidence to communicate effectively with faculty and student researchers about their data and be able to provide initial consultancy on the course topics. Led by expert instructors, sessions will be interactive and will focus on mastery of core concepts, with hands-on exposure to select open source and highly used commercial tools. Sharing of practices and experiences across institutions will be encouraged. The Institute will include topics such as:

  • Data Exploration and Statistical Analysis
  • Bibliometric Analysis
  • Data Visualization
  • Version Control with Git and GitHub
  • Data Description, Sharing, and Reuse
  • Data Cleaning and Preparation
  • Web Scraping
  • Analyzing Textual Data
  • Mapping and Geospatial Visualization
  • Publisher and Funder Data Use Agreements

Newly Revised, Web-Based NLM Disaster Information Specialization Courses Available!

The NLM Basic Level Courses for the Medical Library Association Disaster Information Specialization have all been updated to a new online web-based tutorial format. The courses are self-paced, interactive, and offered at no cost. Anyone completing all 15 hours of the courses is eligible to earn a Basic Level certificate in Disaster Information Specialization from MLA. The Basic Level courses include three from NLM Disaster Health:

  • Disaster Health Information Sources: The Basics
    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the essential resources needed to provide health-related information services for supporting disaster mitigation, planning, response, and recovery.
  • U.S. Response to Disasters and Public Health Emergencies
    This course provides an introduction to disaster/emergency planning and response as conducted in the United States, with an emphasis on medical response.
  • Information Roles in Disaster Management
    This course presents current research findings on librarians’ roles supporting the disaster workforce. Additionally, the information needs of first responders, emergency managers, and other professionals working in the areas of disaster planning, response, and recovery are discussed.

Two additional courses are available online, at no cost, from the FEMA Emergency Management Institute:

  • IS-700.A National Incident Management System (NIMS) An Introduction
    This course introduces and provides an overview of the National Incident Management System (NIMS). NIMS provides a consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together during domestic incidents.
  • IS-100.B Introduction to Incident Command System, ICS-100
    This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System (ICS). ICS is a standardized approach to incident management that enables a coordinated response among various jurisdictions and agencies; establishes common processes for planning and managing resources; and allows for the integration of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure.

Digital Storytelling Competition Announcement for Native American Heritage Month!

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Tribal Health Research Office (THRO) has announced a digital storytelling Challenge, or competition, in honor of Native American Heritage Month. The Challenge, Storytelling about Health and Wellness in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities, involves development of a brief (five minutes or less) digital story that communicates how traditions and heritage promote health within American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. Submissions must be made by January 31, 2017.

The submission is a video that describes: 1) how heritage and tradition leads to health and wellness in AI/AN communities; and 2) how future research can improve the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Submissions are limited to a video that may not exceed five minutes. Winning entries may be posted on the NIH web site. Submissions must be substantially free of scientific jargon and understandable by viewers without scientific/technical backgrounds. The first place winner will receive $4,000; second place will receive $3,000; third place will receive $2,000; and two honorable mentions will each receive $500. Awards will be announced the week of March 6, 2017. The first place winner will also be invited to an upcoming meeting of the NIH Tribal Consultation Advisory Committee. Travel will be reimbursed for those invitees.

Call for Applications: 2017 Institute for Research Design in Librarianship

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) supports librarian researchers in the United States and has issued a call for applications for IRDL 2017. IRDL seeks librarians with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. Twenty librarians will receive, at no cost to them, instruction in research design and a full year of peer/mentor support to complete a research project at their home institutions. The year-long experience begins with a summer workshop on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, CA, from June 3 – June 11, 2017. The application deadline is January 13, 2017. Awards will be announced in early March 2017. Funding for participants is provided by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Loyola Marymount University.

To learn more about this program, check out the recording of the 75-minute informational webinar Librarian as Researcher: Emerging Roles, which featured presentations from four IRDL Scholars; Don Jason, Carolyn Schubert, Lisa Federer, and Electra Enslow.

NIH Issues Request for Information for Data Management Activities

The National Institutes of Health has just issued the Request for Information (RFI), Strategies for NIH Data Management, Sharing, and Citation, to seek public comments on data management and sharing strategies and priorities in order to consider: (1) how digital scientific data generated from NIH-funded research should be managed, and to the fullest extent possible, made publicly available; and, (2) how to set standards for citing shared data and software. The response date deadline is December 29, 2016.

Comments should be submitted electronically. Response to the RFI is voluntary. Responders are free to address any or all of the items in Sections I and II, listed below, or any other relevant topics respondents recognize as important for NIH to consider. Respondents should not feel compelled to address all items.

  • Section I. Data Sharing Strategy Development
  • Section II. Inclusion of Data and Software Citation in NIH Research Performance Progress Reports (RPPR) and Grant Applications

NIH will consider all public comments before taking next steps. No proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should be included in responses. Comments will be compiled and shared publicly in an unedited version after the close of the comment period. The NIH may use information gathered by this RFI to inform development of future funding opportunity announcements and policy development. Additional information about the importance of this RFI is available in a new blog posting, The What and How of Data Sharing, published by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz, NIH Associate Director for Science Policy.