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2017 MEDLINE Data Changes

MeSH vocabulary has been updated for 2017. The MeSH Browser currently points to the 2017 MeSH vocabulary with a link to the 2016 MeSH Vocabulary. Searchers should consult the Browser to find MeSH headings of interest and their relationships to other headings. The Browser contains MeSH heading records that may include Scope Notes, Annotations, Entry Terms, History Notes, Allowable Qualifiers (Subheadings), Previous Indexing, and other information. It also includes Subheading records and Supplementary Concept Records (SCRs) for substances and diseases that are not MeSH headings. MEDLINE records with updated MeSH are anticipated to be in PubMed in mid-December 2016. This year 77 MeSH headings were either changed or deleted and replaced with more up-to-date terminology, and 629 new MeSH headings, including two new Publication Types, were added to MeSH in 2017. In order to improve indexing consistency and efficiency and to make MEDLINE searching easier and more straightforward, a new subheading, “diagnostic imaging,” was added. It replaces three existing subheadings; “radiography,” “radionuclide imaging,” and “ultrasonography.” For an overview of the many other 2017 MEDLINE data changes, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Cataloging and Metadata News from NLM

Starting with 2017, the NLM Classification will be moving from an annual spring update to twice-yearly updates. The winter version, to be published in mid-to-late January, will encompass changes to the NLM Classification resulting from new and changed Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms for 2017 as well as additional minor updates to the index. The summer version, to be published in mid-to-late August, will encompass the ongoing systematic review of particular classification schedules and other miscellaneous updates. The Index to the NLM Classification will reflect 2017 MeSH changes when the 2017 Winter version of the NLM Classification is published in January 2017. This update will be available four months earlier than in the past.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) adopted the 2017 MeSH vocabulary for cataloging on November 21, 2016. Accordingly, MeSH subject headings in LocatorPlus were changed to reflect the 2017 MeSH vocabulary and appear in that form as of November 21, 2016. When year-end processing (YEP) activities are completed in mid-December, the NLM Catalog database and translation tables will be updated to reflect 2017 MeSH. Until then, there will be a hiatus in the addition of new and edited bibliographic records to the NLM Catalog.

The subheading “Calendars” and “Study Guide.” They will not be used by MEDLINE indexers. For additional information, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Save the Date: Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians, April 24-28, 2017, in Raleigh, NC!

The Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians will be held April 24-28, 2017 at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library, North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. Applications for the Institute will be accepted beginning December 12, 2016.

The Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians is a week-long course providing the opportunity for librarians passionate about research and scholarship to immerse themselves in learning about data science and visualization in collaboration with academic peers. Participants will develop knowledge, skills, and confidence to communicate effectively with faculty and student researchers about their data and be able to provide initial consultancy on the course topics. Led by expert instructors, sessions will be interactive and will focus on mastery of core concepts, with hands-on exposure to select open source and highly used commercial tools. Sharing of practices and experiences across institutions will be encouraged. A final schedule will be available in December, including topics such as:

  • Data Exploration and Statistical Analysis
  • Bibliometric Analysis
  • Data Visualization
  • Version Control with Git and GitHub
  • Data Description, Sharing, and Reuse
  • Data Cleaning and Preparation
  • Web Scraping
  • Analyzing Textual Data
  • Mapping and Geospatial Visualization
  • Publisher and Funder Data Use Agreements

Newly Revised, Web-Based NLM Disaster Information Specialization Courses Available!

The NLM Basic Level Courses for the Medical Library Association Disaster Information Specialization have all been updated to a new online web-based tutorial format. The courses are self-paced, interactive, and offered at no cost. Anyone completing all 15 hours of the courses is eligible to earn a Basic Level certificate in Disaster Information Specialization from MLA. The Basic Level courses include three from NLM Disaster Health:

  • Disaster Health Information Sources: The Basics
    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the essential resources needed to provide health-related information services for supporting disaster mitigation, planning, response, and recovery.
  • U.S. Response to Disasters and Public Health Emergencies
    This course provides an introduction to disaster/emergency planning and response as conducted in the United States, with an emphasis on medical response.
  • Information Roles in Disaster Management
    This course presents current research findings on librarians’ roles supporting the disaster workforce. Additionally, the information needs of first responders, emergency managers, and other professionals working in the areas of disaster planning, response, and recovery are discussed.

Two additional courses are available online, at no cost, from the FEMA Emergency Management Institute:

  • IS-700.A National Incident Management System (NIMS) An Introduction
    This course introduces and provides an overview of the National Incident Management System (NIMS). NIMS provides a consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together during domestic incidents.
  • IS-100.B Introduction to Incident Command System, ICS-100
    This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System (ICS). ICS is a standardized approach to incident management that enables a coordinated response among various jurisdictions and agencies; establishes common processes for planning and managing resources; and allows for the integration of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure.

December 2016 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of a dad holding a mop and reading the label on a bottle of cleaning fluid in a kitchenCheck out the December issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Making a Healthier Home: Cast Toxins From Your Living Space
    Take a look around your home. Do you know what’s in your household goods and products? Some chemicals can harm your health if too much gets into your body. Becoming aware of potentially harmful substances and clearing them out can help keep you and your family healthy.
  • Tai Chi and Your Health: A Modern Take on an Ancient Practice
    Tai chi is sometimes referred to as “moving meditation.” There are many types of tai chi. They typically combine slow movements with breathing patterns and mental focus and relaxation. Movements may be done while walking, standing, or sitting.
  • Oxygen Therapy for Patients with COPD
    Certain people with the lung disease known as COPD will not benefit from long-term oxygen therapy, a new study reports. The finding will help doctors and patients choose among different treatment options for this common condition, which makes it hard to breathe.
  • When Clinical Research Is in the News
    There are many types of clinical studies. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. Knowing more about the different types can help you think critically about the health and research news you see and hear.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

New Free Resource: Compendium of Publicly Available Datasets for Factors Impacting Health of Minority Populations

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced the release of a new resource to aid researchers, public health practitioners and policymakers with data on health and health care disparities and social determinants of health. The Compendium of Publicly Available Datasets and Other Data-Related Resources is a free resource that compiles in one place descriptions of and links to 132 public datasets and resources that include information about health conditions and other factors that impact the health of minority populations.

The Compendium includes data and data-related resources from the following federal agencies within the HHS: Administration for Community Living (ACL); Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS); Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA); Indian Health Service (IHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH); and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). It also includes data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The Compendium was created by the Federal Interagency Health Equity Team of the National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities (NPA) to advance research, public policy and the public’s knowledge of issues related to health equity. It fills a gap that researchers and practitioners frequently face in locating federal datasets in one place, with information that is vital to conduct research on various topics. Check it out!

Digital Storytelling Competition Announcement for Native American Heritage Month!

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Tribal Health Research Office (THRO) has announced a digital storytelling Challenge, or competition, in honor of Native American Heritage Month. The Challenge, Storytelling about Health and Wellness in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities, involves development of a brief (five minutes or less) digital story that communicates how traditions and heritage promote health within American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. Submissions must be made by January 31, 2017.

The submission is a video that describes: 1) how heritage and tradition leads to health and wellness in AI/AN communities; and 2) how future research can improve the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Submissions are limited to a video that may not exceed five minutes. Winning entries may be posted on the NIH web site. Submissions must be substantially free of scientific jargon and understandable by viewers without scientific/technical backgrounds. The first place winner will receive $4,000; second place will receive $3,000; third place will receive $2,000; and two honorable mentions will each receive $500. Awards will be announced the week of March 6, 2017. The first place winner will also be invited to an upcoming meeting of the NIH Tribal Consultation Advisory Committee. Travel will be reimbursed for those invitees.

Register Now for 2017 Sessions of the “PubMed for Librarians” Webinar Series!

Registration is now open for the next round of the highly popular PubMed For Librarians webinar series, offered by the NN/LM Training Office. The class is divided into six segments (90 minutes each). Each segment is a synchronous online session that includes hands-on exercises and is worth 1.5 hours of MLA CE credit. Participants can choose any or all of the six segments that are of interest. The segments are as follows:

  • Introduction to PubMed: Learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a PubMed search, assess your search retrieval, analyze search details, employ three ways to search for a known citation, and how to customize with My NCBI.
  • MeSH (Medical Subject Headings): Learn about the NLM Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database. Explore the four different types of MeSH terms and how searchers can benefit from using MeSH to build a search. Investigate the structure of the MeSH database and look at the components of a MeSH record.
  • Automatic Term Mapping (ATM): Learn about Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) – the process that maps keywords from your PubMed search to the controlled vocabulary of the MeSH database. Learn why searching with keywords in PubMed can be an effective approach to searching. Look at the explosion feature, what is and is not included in search details, and explore how PubMed processes phrases.
  • Building and Refining Your Search: Use some of the tools and features built into PubMed that are designed to help you search more effectively. Explore the filters sidebar and Topic-Specific Queries. Use History, tools in the NLM Catalog, and the Advanced Search Builder to build searches and explore topics.
  • Using Evidence-Based Search Features: Explore terminology used for indexing study design in PubMed, explore three PubMed products that facilitate evidence based searching, and learn how to customize My NCBI Filters to quickly locate specific publication types.
  • Customization – My NCBI: Learn about the advantages of creating a My NCBI account, managing and manipulating your My NCBI page content, locating and identifying available filters on PubMed’s filter sidebar, selecting and setting up to fifteen filters, and creating a custom filter.

New Posting on NLM Musings from the Mezzanine!

In the second posting on her new blog, NLM Director Dr. Patti Brennan describes her experience presenting a keynote message at the 2016 AMIA Symposium in Chicago. She encouraged all attendees to participate in NLM’s strategic planning process by responding to the Request for Information, to help NLM chart its third century. She stated that in addition to its commitment to maintain archival knowledge of books, journals, and manuscripts; NLM’s future will include data and virtual information!

Call for Applications: 2017 Institute for Research Design in Librarianship

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) supports librarian researchers in the United States and has issued a call for applications for IRDL 2017. IRDL seeks librarians with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. Twenty librarians will receive, at no cost to them, instruction in research design and a full year of peer/mentor support to complete a research project at their home institutions. The year-long experience begins with a summer workshop on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, CA, from June 3 – June 11, 2017. The application deadline is January 13, 2017. Awards will be announced in early March 2017. Funding for participants is provided by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Loyola Marymount University.

To learn more about this program, register for the 75-minute informational webinar Librarian as Researcher: Emerging Roles, on Monday, December 12, at 10:00 AM PST. The session will feature presentations from four IRDL Scholars; Don Jason, Carolyn Schubert, Lisa Federer, and Electra Enslow.