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New National Library of Medicine Traveling Exhibit- Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care

The National Library of Medicine, in partnership with the Physician Assistant History Society, launches Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care, a traveling banner exhibition with an online adaptation. This exhibition was curated by Loren Miller, PhD, an independent historian and curator.

Collaboration has been the foundation of the Physician Assistant (PA) profession since the first three PAs graduated from Duke University’s training program in 1967. PAs practice medicine as a dynamic part of a team, alongside doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals; and work within diverse communities to treat patients and improve lives by addressing health care shortages. Originally focused on general practice, today’s PAs serve in a variety of medical specialties and settings. The field continues to widen, as PAs aid populations all over the world in times of need and training programs proliferate globally.

Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care describes how the profession developed as a solution to meet the social and health care needs of the mid-20th century and continues to evolve today. The exhibition features stories of PAs in communities all over the world and on the front lines of health crises, like the recent Ebola epidemic. It also features PAs from the highest echelons of government, including Congresswoman Karen Bass from California and George McCullough, the first White House PA.

The online exhibition offers resources for educators and students, including lesson plans for middle school and high school classrooms, a higher education module, and a robust selection of related links and suggested readings.

Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care will travel to 50 sites across the country over the next four years. Please visit the Traveling Exhibition Services Web site to see the tour itinerary and find this exhibition near you.

Announcing New Funding Opportunities

The NN/LM PNR invites applications for a new suite of funding opportunities.  Check these out if you want: support to partner on research and data projects or events; funding for technology improvement; or support for professional development.

Eligible applications for Health Sciences Library Partnership projects and Technology Improvement projects will be awarded on a first come, first serve basis, and you can submit an application anytime until November 10, 2016. However, please let us know you intend to apply at least 3 weeks before you submit, so we can get reviewers lined up to screen your application. Please submit your statement of intent to apply to nnlm@uw.edu.

For Professional Development awards, applications will be accepted anytime for activities that take place before April 30, 2017.

Also, if you have other ideas and you are not sure there is a ‘fit’ with these currently available awards, please drop us a line (nnlm@uw.edu) and briefly describe your idea. We want to hear from you, so don’t hold back!

Dr. Patricia Brennan, the new Director of the National Library of Medicine

On September 12, 2016, Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, was sworn in as the 19th director of the Library and the fourth person to serve as director since the institution became the National Library of Medicine 60 years ago. She is not only the first woman but also the first nurse to hold this position.

In her remarks, Dr. Brennan addressed a number of health and information issues. She relayed that her focus, while working as a nurse and an industrial engineer, was of reaching into the home because the place where most health occurs is in the home. But since most people do not want strangers traipsing through their private domain, addressing the health needs of individuals at the point of when they need it presented a challenge and required innovative solutions. She made further comments about the role of NLM and the need to make health information accessible at the point of need for both professionals and for consumers and innovative solutions will be required to meet those needs. Dr. Brennan remarked that by looking at the past  it can become part of our present. She recognized the work of past NLM leaders which has led to some wonderful contributions over the years and even will continue to influence the present and the future. Dr. Brennan’s speech illustrated her knowledge and awareness of the present needs of researchers, healthcare professionals, and healthcare consumers but also emphasizing that NLM be ready for what lies ahead.

Dr. Brennan mentioned she would be working with the NLM Board of Regents on a one-year strategic planning initiative to create a vision for the future of the National Library of Medicine. She looks forward to working with all those associated with the National Library of Medicine to work together in achieving future goals so that NLM can continue to be a vital component in the world of research, information, and health. Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health,  shared “We’re on your team and want to make this dream turn into something really spectacular and you’re just the right leader to make this happen.”

We all welcome Dr. Brennan as she takes the helm of NLM and leads it into the future. Watch the full swearing in ceremony https://videocast.nih.gov/Summary.asp?Live=19671&bhcp=1

Finding Reputable Journals

The growth in importance of scholarly publishing and open access has also had an unfortunate consequence of a rise in disreputable or predatory journal publishing. These publishers can create a negative impact on the spirit of open access publishing, as well as preying upon less experienced authors. Librarians can help guide authors to reputable journals and teach them what criteria to use to evaluate publishers.

The questionable journals, which do not have high impact factors, sometimes sponsor “fake” conferences, and may charge authors to publish, often prey upon recent graduates or issue invitations to serve on their editorial boards as a way to gain legitimacy. Some factors to use in judging whether a journal is reputable: 1) Do they send spam email soliciting papers? 2) Do they charge for publishing? 3)Do they require copyright transfer when the manuscript is submitted?

The Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association offers a Code of Conduct for their members, which includes the dissemination of peer-reviewed manuscripts without charge or registration required, and allowing users to copy, distribute and use freely their published material. Requirements for membership in their association include: a regularly published open access book or journal, full contact information available on the web site, a well-defined peer review process, and appropriate activity for soliciting manuscripts.

Many academic libraries have published criteria for their users to assist them in identifying reputable journals, for example:

The University of Tennessee Veterinary School: Research Support Guide.
Queensborough Community College: Open Access, Open Education, & More: Predatory Publishing.
John Jay College of Criminal Justice: Open Access Publishing.
Texas A&M University: Open Access and Predatory Journals.
California State University: Psychology Predatory Journals.

Additional References:

  1. Chen, Cenyu, and Bo-Christer Björk. “Predatory’ Open Access: A Longitudinal Study of Article Volumes and Market Characteristics.” BMC Medicine 13 (2015): 230. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.
  2. Hansoti, Bhakti, Mark I. Langdorf, and Linda S. Murphy. “Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee.” Western Journal of Emergency Medicine 17.5 (2016): 497–507. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.
  3. Gasparyan, Armen Yuri et al. “Publishing Ethics and Predatory Practices: A Dilemma for All Stakeholders of Science Communication.” Journal of Korean Medical Science 30.8 (2015): 1010–1016. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.
  4. Wicherts, Jelte M. “Peer Review Quality and Transparency of the Peer-Review Process in Open Access and Subscription Journals.” Ed. Gemma Elizabeth Derrick. PLoS ONE 11.1 (2016): e0147913. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.

 

 

Health Hotlines to be Retired

Health Hotlines was developed by NLM as a community service to help the public locate health-related information from organizations with toll free numbers. Organizations listed included such categories as Federal, State, and local government agencies, information and referral centers, professional societies, support groups and voluntary associations.

NLM has decided it will no longer update the Health Hotlines database because most of the information is now readily available through web search engines and because many of the organizations no longer have toll free numbers. Health Hotlines will remain online until the end of January, 2017, at which time it will be retired.

Ann Glusker Interview at MLA

ann-gluskerAnn Glusker, Reference Librarian at NN/LM PNR Network member institution Seattle Public Library, was interviewed by McGraw-Hill Education at the annual Medical Library Association Conference in Toronto, Ontario in May 2016. She talked about her experiences on the reference desk and the way that information is being delivered and consumed, and also how to make sure healthcare consumers are getting reliable information, stressing the importance of staff education as well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exGTAr_u8gU