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PNR Update is the next PNR Rendezvous webinar

PNR Rendezvous graphicThe next PNR Rendezvous session is a chance for those who may not be familiar with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) to be introduced to their regional office, the Pacific Northwest Region or more commonly referred to as the PNR. It can be a bit confusing especially because we promote and feature the resources of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) which is one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

For those of you familiar with the NN/LM PNR we will be updating you about some of the changes that have been occurring at the NN/LM and NLM as well as our own regional office.

 

 

In this session the NN/LM PNR staff will introduce themselves and let you know a little more about who we are and what we do. You will:

  • hear what changes have been happening and our focus in the next year or two
  • get a walk-through of the new website
  • learn how your institution can become a member (for free!)
  • check out funding opportunities
  • learn how to create an account
  • find out how we can assist you with your communities’ health information needs

Bring your ideas of what you’d like from the PNR as well as questions!

Wednesday, January 18, 1:00 – 2:00pm PT, Noon – 1:00pm Alaska Time, 2:00 – 3:00pm Mountain Time

Information on how to connect to the webinar at https://nnlm.gov/classes/pnr-rendezvous

2017 Comics and Medicine Conference

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The 2017 Comics & Medicine Conference, to be held in Seattle June 15-17, is accepting proposals, due January 30. The conference is free to attend and will take place at the Seattle Public Library in downtown Seattle.

The conference theme is Access Points. Participants are invited to consider accessibility as a crucial aspect linking comics and health. Comics — a medium broadly characterized as “accessible” because of its ability to reach diverse audiences and to provide a platform for marginalized voices — can make visible and reflect upon the urgent subject of health access. Comics can explore the issue of accessibility in past and current practices of health care and can point to imaginative solutions for extending and expanding health care.

Submissions focusing on health, medicine, and comics in any form (e.g. graphic novels and memoir, comic strips, manga, web comics) are welcomed, including those that focus on the following topics:

  • Comics depictions of disability
  • Visual depictions of systemic and structural inequities in health care and social determinants of health
  • Use of comics to provide health education for or about under-served communities
  • Comics representations of physical or geographical spaces related to the delivery of medical care
  • Collaborative comics projects that create access points between patients, healthcare providers, community organizations, and/or institutional stakeholders
  • Use of comics to access new understandings of bodily/mental states
  • Therapeutic uses of comics and cartooning
  • Use of comics to encourage conversations about accessible spaces/events
  • Innovative uses of comics to access diverse health experiences
  • Use of comics to visualize ideological and/or political boundaries and access to medical therapies
  • Comics and environmental health
  • Ethical implications of creating comics for patients, physicians, or institutions
  • Trends in, histories of, or the use of comics in health care and public health

Lightning talks, presentations, panel discussion and working groups and workshops are the presentation formats. See more information at their website.

 

Data Science for Social Good Summer Program ­

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The University of Washington eScience Institute, in collaboration with Urban@UW and Microsoft, is excited to announce the 2017 Data Science for Social Good (DSSG) summer program. The program brings together data and domain scientists to work on focused, collaborative projects that are designed to impact public policy for social benefit.

Modeled after similar programs at the University of Chicago and Georgia Tech, with elements from our own Data Science Incubator, sixteen DSSG Student Fellows will be selected to work with academic researchers, data scientists, and public stakeholder groups on data-intensive research projects.

This year’s projects will have an applied social good dimension and broadly address questions related to social science, human services, public policy, criminal justice, environmental impacts, and urban informatics. We welcome proposals submitted by academic researchers, public agencies, non-profit entities, and industry.

NN/LM National Evaluation Center’s Favorite Things

This is reposted from the National Evaluation Center (NEO)’s blog, NEO Shop Talk: https://nnlm.gov/evaluation/blog/2016/12/21/my-favorite-things-2016-spoiler-alert-includes-cats/

My Favorite Things 2016 (Spoiler Alert: Includes Cats) by Cindy Olney

Little figurine of Santa standing in snow, holding gifts

During gift-giving season every year, Oprah publishes a list of her favorite things. Well, move over, Oprah, because I also have a list. This is my bag of holiday gifts for our NEO Shop Talk readers.

Art Exhibits

There are two websites with galleries of data visualizations that are really fun to visit. The first,  Information is Beautiful , has wonderful examples of data visualizations, many of which are interactive. My favorites from this site are Who Old Are You?   (put in your birth date to start it) and Common MythConceptions. The other is Tableau Public, Tableau Software Company’s “public commons” for their users to share their work.  My picks are the Endangered Species Safari  and the data visualization of the Simpsons Vizapedia.  And, in case  you’re wondering what happened to your favorite Crayola crayon colors, you can find out here. Read more »

Translational Research and Information Lab (TRAIL)

TRAIL Room

This is a guest post from Emily Patridge, Assistant Director of Clinical Research and Data Services, TRAIL Program Manager, University of Washington Health Sciences Library. We welcome guest posts in Dragonfly. Please contact Patricia Devine if interested.

In early December 2016, the University of Washington’s Health Sciences Library, in partnership with the Institute of Translational Health Sciences (ITHS), UW Medicine Research Information Technology (RIT), and the Pacific Northwest Region of the National Network of National Libraries of Medicine (PNR), launched an exciting new initiative, the Translational Research and Information Lab (TRAIL). Read more »

The Importance of Flexibility

This is a guest post from Kathryn Kane, Health Sciences Outreach Librarian. It originally appeared in her blog, Adventures in Library Land: My Travels Through the World of Professional Librarianship. We welcome guest posts in Dragonfly. Please contact Patricia Devine if interested.

My position as a Health Sciences Outreach Librarian is entirely new, so I am able to design my work approach as I go along. I love that freedom, but as I’ve said before, it can also be challenging because I am essentially making things up as I go along. Sometimes my initial approach is successful, and sometimes it misses the mark. Over the last few months, I have been working on ways to increase awareness of health information resources among rural healthcare professionals in my region. The original aim was to meet with healthcare professionals in person and guide them through an interactive workshop, and supplement that contact with online resources. Read more »