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National Nutrition Month®

photo of fresh fruit and vegetablesMarch is National Nutrition Month and your libraries or organizations might wish to incorporate programs and services and links to information in the communities you serve. Here are some resources which provide not only nutritional information but tip sheets, videos, lesson plans and more to help encourage healthier communities.

National Nutrition Month® Put Your Best Fork Forward
National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Put Your Best Fork Forward” is this year’s theme which reminds us to start with small changes in our eating habits – one forkful at a time. Making small changes during National Nutrition Month® and over time, helps improve health now and into the future. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics provides games, videos, tips as well as a Celebration Toolkit with resources and ideas for school, work and at home. Go to the website to learn more http://www.eatright.org/resources/national-nutrition-month

MyPlate is Here for You During National Nutrition Month!®
Join MyPlate this spring in celebrating a favorite topic, nutrition! You’ll find videos, interactive tools, tip sheets, ideas for eating on a budget and even posters and lesson plans for schools. Whether you are a dietitian, educator, parent, or someone who is just trying to eat a bit better, ChooseMyPlate.gov has resources to help you achieve your healthy eating goals this month, and all year long. Learn more at https://www.choosemyplate.gov/national-nutrition-month

Nutrition.gov
Nutrition.gov is a government resource which serves as a gateway to authoritative information regarding nutrition, healthy eating, physical activity, and food safety for consumers. Though it doesn’t have specific information for observing National Nutrition Month® it does provide links to information such as finding information about:

  • dietary supplements
  • calories and nutrients in food
  • weight management
  • meal planning, shopping and cooking tips

Fine more at https://www.nutrition.gov/

MedlinePlus
A wealth of nutrition information is available at MedlinePlus. In the health topics section is a category titled “Food and Nutrition” at https://medlineplus.gov/foodandnutrition.html. Clicking on that will take you to a list of information regarding specific vitamins, nutrients, diets, as well as nutrition for specific populations such as children and seniors. Some information is available in other languages but you may find Health Reach a better resource for multiple language information at https://healthreach.nlm.nih.gov/searchindex/Nutrition

PNR Rendezvous webinar March 15

PNR Rendezvous graphic
When: Wednesday March 15, 1:00pm PT, Noon Alaska, 2:00pm Mountain

How to connecthttps://nnlm.gov/class/retracted-articles-pubmed/6689 (no registration required)

A lot can happen after work is published. Work can progress, leaving findings supported, out-of-date, or refuted. Others can have questions for the authors, or identify problems. The records of a range of these post-publication activities find their way into PubMed. Join us next Wednesday to hear Hilda Bastian, from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), discuss the changing visibility and accessibility of post-publication activity in PubMed in her presentation, “What’s New in Post-Publication Activities in PubMed”

The webinar is an hour long and is eligible for 1 MLA CE credit either for attending the live session or viewing the recording.

We hope you can join us for this informative session!

Fair Use Myths and Facts

In conjunction with Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017, the Association of Research Libraries is releasing an infographic that refutes 10 popular misperceptions about fair use. Fair use and fair dealing are vitally important rights for everybody, everywhere — students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material. These doctrines provide balance to the copyright system by allowing the use of copyrighted resources without permission from the rightsholder under certain circumstances, thereby promoting creative progress and accommodating freedom of expression. See: “Fair Use Myths & Facts” infographic (PDF).

Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is an annual, community celebration coordinated by the Association of Research Libraries to promote the opportunities presented by fair use and fair dealing, highlight successful stories, and explain these doctrines. Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017 is being observed this week, Monday, February 20, through Friday, February 24. Visit fairuseweek.org to participate or find additional resources on popular topics from this week and previous Fair Use Weeks, including copyright policy and the nature of copyright, factors of fair use, government blogs, digital materials, innovation, fair use in the media, scholarly publishing and open access, educational uses, and case studies.

Rare Disease Day is February 28

Rare Disease Day PosterMore than 6,500 rare diseases exists at this time and less than 5 percent have a treatment. In the United States a rare disease is one that affects less than 200,000 people. However, roughly 25 to 30 million Americans are affected by a rare disease. Many of these diseases:

  • May involve chronic illness, disability, and often premature death
  • Often have no treatment or not very effective treatment
  • Are frequently not diagnosed correctly
  • Are often very complex
  • Are often caused by changes in genes

The theme for this year’s Rare Disease Day is “Research” with the slogan, “With research, possibilities are limitless”.  Research is key to find treatments and possible cures as well as improving the care of those with a rare disease. The philosophy of NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS) is to work closely with families, caregivers, advocates and patients in order to make greater advancements in rare disease research. February 28 is a time to recognize the advancements being made, bring awareness, share personal stories, and encourage dialogue among researchers, advocates, families and others.

Learn more about Rare Disease Day and how you and your organization can get involved at http://www.rarediseaseday.org/

Learn more about rare diseases through a number of websites:

Love Your Data Week, Day 5: Rescuing Unloved Data

How do data become unloved?  We data users don’t love data that are messy, poorly documented, incomplete, or unwieldy, to name just a few frustrations.  However, one important way that data become unloved is that they are just plain old.  Older data tend not to be machine-readable, which can pretty much be the kiss of death.  Digitization, while it’s improving, is still somewhat labor-intensive and costly, and so unless a data set is obviously worth the trouble, it may languish.

However, researchers are starting to explore whether there may be some hidden gems worth rescuing.  One area in which this is happening is climate data, and a great example is the Glacier Photograph Collection from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).  Before this collection was digitized, users had to travel to the NSIDC in Colorado, ask staff to find physical images or microfilm for them in the collection, and then deal with those physical artefacts.  Not surprisingly, the collection had few users.  However, digitizing these photographs (which can be considered data sources, as they contain information that can be analyzed) has made them not only accessible, but an important resource for documenting changes in glacier size and coverage.  Digitizing some of the old photographs also suggests locations for repeat photographs from the same vantage point, which can indicate changes across time periods.

PHOTO: Left: William O. Field, 1941; Right: Bruce F. Molnia, 2004. Muir Glacier: From the Glacier Photograph Collection. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.

But, using the above example is cheating a little bit; these photographs were unloved because they were undigitized, but it was clear that they were worth digitizing.  In fact, it was so clear that NSIDC was able to get funding and enter into partnerships to get that work done.  So, what if a researcher has a great idea, but needs sheer person-power to bring it to fruition?  These days, crowd-sourcing may do the trick!  Check out the Swiss project Data Rescue @ Home, in which citizen-volunteers are entering German climate data collected during WWII, and also have completed entering data from a weather station in the Solomon Islands collected in the early to mid-1900s.  By January 2014, they reported having digitized 1.3 million values!   They note: “The old data are expected to be very useful for different international research and reanalysis projects…[for example,] historical weather data from the Azores Islands are particularly valuable since the islands are located at the southern node of the most important climatic variability mode in the North Atlantic-European region, the so-called North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and there are not much other historical data available from the larger region.”

PHOTO: Example of data collected in the Solomon Islands, entered electronically by citizen-volunteers of the Data Rescue @ Home project (Accessed 2-13-17).

Interested in getting involved in a citizen-science project yourself? Here’s a list of possibilities!  And, if you really get hooked, you may want to dive into some collections of older non-digitized data and consider starting your own project, to rescue the unloved data and give them new life.

OK, I’m off now to figure out how to get on the project where I can hang out on the beach in New Jersey and count horseshoe crabs!

 

Love Your Data Week, Day 4: DataLumos

The theme for Day 4 of “Love Your Data Week” is “Finding the Right Data”. There’s a lot of open national health data out there– Data.gov’s health portal, and the “Data and Tools” tab on the main page of the National Center for Health Statistics are good sources (also this list of open access data repositories has a good section on medicine).

But, any open data on the internet can be vulnerable if there isn’t a commitment to preserve it or if organizational priorities change, and government data are no exception. Enter DataLumos! This service, launched (not coincidentally) during “Love Your Data Week”, aims to preserve government data by archiving it into the future. The data will be gathered and maintained by ICPSR, the respected data center at the University of Michigan. Want to hear more? There’s a webinar about it tomorrow! You can register here.

Also, check out the wider work of DataRefuge and Data Rescue projects springing up across the United States (in fact, the University of Washington is hosting a Data Rescue event next weekend). We may not know yet why a data set could be important to preserve for the future, but careful and committed archiving at least will give future data scientists and seekers the option to use it.

And, it’s also no coincidence that the creators of the archive are using the term Lumos; it is the spell, in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling, that turns a wand into a flashlight. The idea is that they are working to keep data sets well-lit by keeping them open.  In future, there will be these and many other open data sets to choose from, to advance research and data science!