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Archive for the ‘Training & Education’ Category

Finding Reputable Journals

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

The growth in importance of scholarly publishing and open access has also had an unfortunate consequence of a rise in disreputable or predatory journal publishing. These publishers can create a negative impact on the spirit of open access publishing, as well as preying upon less experienced authors. Librarians can help guide authors to reputable journals and teach them what criteria to use to evaluate publishers.

The questionable journals, which do not have high impact factors, sometimes sponsor “fake” conferences, and may charge authors to publish, often prey upon recent graduates or issue invitations to serve on their editorial boards as a way to gain legitimacy. Some factors to use in judging whether a journal is reputable: 1) Do they send spam email soliciting papers? 2) Do they charge for publishing? 3)Do they require copyright transfer when the manuscript is submitted?

The Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association offers a Code of Conduct for their members, which includes the dissemination of peer-reviewed manuscripts without charge or registration required, and allowing users to copy, distribute and use freely their published material. Requirements for membership in their association include: a regularly published open access book or journal, full contact information available on the web site, a well-defined peer review process, and appropriate activity for soliciting manuscripts.

Many academic libraries have published criteria for their users to assist them in identifying reputable journals, for example:

The University of Tennessee Veterinary School: Research Support Guide.
Queensborough Community College: Open Access, Open Education, & More: Predatory Publishing.
John Jay College of Criminal Justice: Open Access Publishing.
Texas A&M University: Open Access and Predatory Journals.
California State University: Psychology Predatory Journals.

Additional References:

  1. Chen, Cenyu, and Bo-Christer Björk. “Predatory’ Open Access: A Longitudinal Study of Article Volumes and Market Characteristics.” BMC Medicine 13 (2015): 230. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.
  2. Hansoti, Bhakti, Mark I. Langdorf, and Linda S. Murphy. “Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee.” Western Journal of Emergency Medicine 17.5 (2016): 497–507. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.
  3. Gasparyan, Armen Yuri et al. “Publishing Ethics and Predatory Practices: A Dilemma for All Stakeholders of Science Communication.” Journal of Korean Medical Science 30.8 (2015): 1010–1016. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.
  4. Wicherts, Jelte M. “Peer Review Quality and Transparency of the Peer-Review Process in Open Access and Subscription Journals.” Ed. Gemma Elizabeth Derrick. PLoS ONE 11.1 (2016): e0147913. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.

 

 

Free Webinar: A Beginners Guide to Creating Accessible Documents

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Are you interested in learning how to make your documents accessible to people with disabilities? The Institute on Disability is offering this free webinar tomorrow at 12:30 Pacific Time.

From their website:

Accessible Document Icon“Description:

During this webinar, participants will learn the steps for creating an accessible document and the importance of having content accessible. Areas to be explored include the use of alternative tags, styles, headings, and hyperlink texts. Pitfalls for creating accessible materials will be explored and elements to be avoided will also be analyzed. By the end of the session participants will have the knowledge to make every document moving forward accessible.

Who Should Attend:

Anyone who creates print or digital documents and anyone who wants to know why this is important: this includes general and special educators, paraeducators, assistive technology specialists and providers, accessibility professionals, ADA administrators, physical and occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, rehabilitation engineers, vocational rehabilitation counselors, document creators, communication or accessibility coordinators, website content managers, marketing managers, and administrative assistants.”

To register, click here: http://www.iod.unh.edu/Services/eventdetail/16-06-20/A_Beginners_Guide_to_Creating_Accessible_Documents.aspx

Next PNR Rendezvous – Precision Medicine

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

“Adventures in Precision Medicine: A Major Public Research Initiative and it Implications for Healthcare Consumers and Institutions” is the title of our next PNR Rendezvous webinar September 21. Malia Fullerton, Associate Professor of Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Adjunct Associate Professor in the UW Departments of Epidemiology and Genome Sciences, as well as an affiliate investigator with the Public Health Sciences division of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC).  In early 2015 President Barack Obama announced an ambitious research initiative aimed at generating data needed to usher in a new era of medicine, one that will deliver “the right treatments, at the right time, every time to the right person.” This project, known now as the Precision Medicine Initiative or PMI, is recently underway and seeks to enroll 1 million or more patients from around the United States.  What will healthcare consumers need to know before they decide to participate?  And how will the national effort to study specimens, medical record data, and information collected by mobile health technologies from thousands of patients impact healthcare delivery?

Public librarians and those working in healthcare will find this an informative session as Precision Medicine becomes the primary delivery of healthcare. This impacts not just researchers and clinicians but the general public as healthcare consumers.

When: September 21, 1:00pm Pacific Time, Noon Alaska Time, 2:00pm Mountain Time (more…)

Teaching Social Determinants of Health

Monday, September 12th, 2016

The social determinants of health — or conditions under which people live, work, attend school and play — have an effect on health, quality of life, access to care, life expectancy, and more. Factors such as socioeconomic status, education, and physical environment contribute to risk factors and life expectancy. The Kaiser Family Foundation has an issue brief addressing these issues, Beyond Health Care: The Role of Social Determinants in Promoting Health and Health Equity. The Centers for Disease Control’s Social Determinants of Health page has tools for teaching and learning about the social determinants of health, as does Healthy People 2020, with Interventions and Resources.

Teaching health professions students about the impact of social determinants of health, especially in medical school, is part of a recent trend towards social accountability. Educating future medial providers to be aware of the diversity of their patient populations will lead to better care for these patients. Published in the journal,Medical Teacher, Twelve Tips for Teaching Social Determinants of Health in Medicine, seeks to increase awareness and provide recommendations based on a review of the literature to develop ways of teaching medical students to think critically about the social and cultural issues impacting health.

K-12 NLM Games: Reinforce Science Concepts and Supplement Curricula

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

Over the years NLM  talked with hundreds of science teachers of all grade levels from all over the country.  These teachers were asked what they wanted from NLM resources. Since science concepts can be difficult to understand and to remember many of these science teachers requested animated videos or games to help supplement their curricula and help students better understand concepts of science using a method they would find enjoyable. Whether wanting to pair DNA or learn about chemicals, these games offered by NLM are a fun and creative way for students to better grasp concepts and reinforce learning.

Bohr Thru: 3-match style game which requires users to collect and organize protons, neutrons and electrons in order to create Bohr models that represent the first 18 elements on the periodic table, such as Carbon, Nitrogen and Lithium. With the help of the main character, Atom, players become familiar with a variety of chemical elements and their structures. Teachers can easily implement short, in-class game sessions to enhance their students’ understanding of the periodic table.

ToxInvaders:  Players learn about chemicals and the environment by engaging in an interactive shooter game to protect the environment from toxic chemicals.  Quizzes are taken to progress between levels. A detailed tutorial is included. Available for iPhone and iPad.

Base Chase: Learn the bases of DNA with this fast-paced, educational app. Players grab bases of DNA in order to complete unique DNA strands for a variety of animals. DeeNA, the game’s cartoon mascot, assists players in completing each of the required tasks. The game includes a helpful tutorial. Available for iPhone and iPad.

Run4Green: The importance of environmental conservation is reinforced through this interactive, slide scrolling game. Topics, such as greenhouse gas reduction, renewable energy and green product purchases are emphasized throughout game play. Playing as a jolly, green and earth-shaped character, users collect coins and perform environmentally friendly tasks. The game is appropriate for students in grades 5-8. Available for iPhone and iPad. (more…)

Free Online CE Classes: PubMed for Librarians – registration is open

Friday, August 19th, 2016

If your institution or organization includes programs in the health sciences, involves the health of the public, or works with biomedical researchers, most likely PubMed is a resource often used or should be considered for their work. Unfamiliar with PubMed or want a refresher course so you can better serve your colleagues? Consider taking one or all of the classes offered by our National Training Center.

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO) is offering three free online PubMed CE classes in September in a series called PubMed for Librarians.

  1. Introduction to PubMed: September 7, 2016 (9:00am Pacific Time)
  1. MeSH: September 14, 2016 (9:00am Pacific Time)
  1. Automatic Term Mapping: September 21, 2016 (9:00am Pacific Time)

Read a description for all three classes and find the link to the registration page here: https://nnlm.gov/ntc/pml/

PubMed is a free resource that is developed and maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), at the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), located at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). PubMed includes free access to MEDLINE, the NLM database of indexed citations and abstracts to medical, nursing, dental, veterinary, health care, and preclinical sciences journal articles as well as additional selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE.