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Archive for September, 2016

Finding Reputable Journals

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

The growth in importance of scholarly publishing and open access has also had an unfortunate consequence of a rise in disreputable or predatory journal publishing. These publishers can create a negative impact on the spirit of open access publishing, as well as preying upon less experienced authors. Librarians can help guide authors to reputable journals and teach them what criteria to use to evaluate publishers.

The questionable journals, which do not have high impact factors, sometimes sponsor “fake” conferences, and may charge authors to publish, often prey upon recent graduates or issue invitations to serve on their editorial boards as a way to gain legitimacy. Some factors to use in judging whether a journal is reputable: 1) Do they send spam email soliciting papers? 2) Do they charge for publishing? 3)Do they require copyright transfer when the manuscript is submitted?

The Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association offers a Code of Conduct for their members, which includes the dissemination of peer-reviewed manuscripts without charge or registration required, and allowing users to copy, distribute and use freely their published material. Requirements for membership in their association include: a regularly published open access book or journal, full contact information available on the web site, a well-defined peer review process, and appropriate activity for soliciting manuscripts.

Many academic libraries have published criteria for their users to assist them in identifying reputable journals, for example:

The University of Tennessee Veterinary School: Research Support Guide.
Queensborough Community College: Open Access, Open Education, & More: Predatory Publishing.
John Jay College of Criminal Justice: Open Access Publishing.
Texas A&M University: Open Access and Predatory Journals.
California State University: Psychology Predatory Journals.

Additional References:

  1. Chen, Cenyu, and Bo-Christer Björk. “Predatory’ Open Access: A Longitudinal Study of Article Volumes and Market Characteristics.” BMC Medicine 13 (2015): 230. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.
  2. Hansoti, Bhakti, Mark I. Langdorf, and Linda S. Murphy. “Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee.” Western Journal of Emergency Medicine 17.5 (2016): 497–507. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.
  3. Gasparyan, Armen Yuri et al. “Publishing Ethics and Predatory Practices: A Dilemma for All Stakeholders of Science Communication.” Journal of Korean Medical Science 30.8 (2015): 1010–1016. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.
  4. Wicherts, Jelte M. “Peer Review Quality and Transparency of the Peer-Review Process in Open Access and Subscription Journals.” Ed. Gemma Elizabeth Derrick. PLoS ONE 11.1 (2016): e0147913. PMC. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.

 

 

Health Hotlines to be Retired

Monday, September 26th, 2016

Health Hotlines was developed by NLM as a community service to help the public locate health-related information from organizations with toll free numbers. Organizations listed included such categories as Federal, State, and local government agencies, information and referral centers, professional societies, support groups and voluntary associations.

NLM has decided it will no longer update the Health Hotlines database because most of the information is now readily available through web search engines and because many of the organizations no longer have toll free numbers. Health Hotlines will remain online until the end of January, 2017, at which time it will be retired.

Ann Glusker Interview at MLA

Saturday, September 24th, 2016

ann-gluskerAnn Glusker, Reference Librarian at NN/LM PNR Network member institution Seattle Public Library, was interviewed by McGraw-Hill Education at the annual Medical Library Association Conference in Toronto, Ontario in May 2016. She talked about her experiences on the reference desk and the way that information is being delivered and consumed, and also how to make sure healthcare consumers are getting reliable information, stressing the importance of staff education as well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exGTAr_u8gU

NLM and ALA Partnership Brings Native Voices Exhibit to Libraries in PNR Region

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

Native Voices logo

A year ago last fall, the American Library Association (ALA) and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) partnered to bring the NLM traveling exhibition, Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness to academic, public, and tribal libraries in the United States and other Native-serving cultural institutions beginning in 2016 through 2020.  Libraries and institutions were encouraged to apply for this opportunity and the awardees were announced late in 2015. Here, in the Pacific Northwest Region, several libraries received notice that they were selected. In fact, libraries in all five states are represented.

In 2016 three libraries were hosts to Native Voices and include libraries at Clark College, Fort Peck Community College, and North Seattle College. Library staff from each of these libraries have written a short summary of the activities planned around the exhibit as well as the benefits to the library community.

 

James E Shanley Tribal Library, Fort Peck Community College, Poplar, MT
Hosted exhibit from Feb. 3 – March 16, 2016

Anita Scheetz wrote,

The exhibit opened on February 4th but we held the native blessing and smudged the building and the exhibit on February 18. As part of the Native Voices grant, we were asked to do two health related programs but since we had the exhibit for an extended length of time we decided to do one each week in the month of March. The most popular of these events was the Native plants program.

  • March 3 Lois Red Elk  “Native Plants and Medicines”
  • March 10 Loy Sprague “Mind Body Medicine: Mindfulness and Stress Reduction”
  • March 17 Dr. Christine Holler-Dinsmore will present “Science, Faith, Family, Friends and Healing”
  • March 24 Beth Brown Morgan “Essential Oils: Uses in Health”
  • March 30 Teresa Rorvik “Pitfalls of Fad Diets”

There have been lots of people reading the posters and checking out the iPads.  I don’t have exact numbers but almost everyone who comes in stops and looks at the banners.

 

Cannell Library, Clark College, Vancouver, WA
Hosted exhibit from Feb. 3 – March 16, 2016

Laura Nagel wrote, (more…)

Free Webinar: A Beginners Guide to Creating Accessible Documents

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Are you interested in learning how to make your documents accessible to people with disabilities? The Institute on Disability is offering this free webinar tomorrow at 12:30 Pacific Time.

From their website:

Accessible Document Icon“Description:

During this webinar, participants will learn the steps for creating an accessible document and the importance of having content accessible. Areas to be explored include the use of alternative tags, styles, headings, and hyperlink texts. Pitfalls for creating accessible materials will be explored and elements to be avoided will also be analyzed. By the end of the session participants will have the knowledge to make every document moving forward accessible.

Who Should Attend:

Anyone who creates print or digital documents and anyone who wants to know why this is important: this includes general and special educators, paraeducators, assistive technology specialists and providers, accessibility professionals, ADA administrators, physical and occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, rehabilitation engineers, vocational rehabilitation counselors, document creators, communication or accessibility coordinators, website content managers, marketing managers, and administrative assistants.”

To register, click here: http://www.iod.unh.edu/Services/eventdetail/16-06-20/A_Beginners_Guide_to_Creating_Accessible_Documents.aspx

Next PNR Rendezvous – Precision Medicine

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

“Adventures in Precision Medicine: A Major Public Research Initiative and it Implications for Healthcare Consumers and Institutions” is the title of our next PNR Rendezvous webinar September 21. Malia Fullerton, Associate Professor of Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Adjunct Associate Professor in the UW Departments of Epidemiology and Genome Sciences, as well as an affiliate investigator with the Public Health Sciences division of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC).  In early 2015 President Barack Obama announced an ambitious research initiative aimed at generating data needed to usher in a new era of medicine, one that will deliver “the right treatments, at the right time, every time to the right person.” This project, known now as the Precision Medicine Initiative or PMI, is recently underway and seeks to enroll 1 million or more patients from around the United States.  What will healthcare consumers need to know before they decide to participate?  And how will the national effort to study specimens, medical record data, and information collected by mobile health technologies from thousands of patients impact healthcare delivery?

Public librarians and those working in healthcare will find this an informative session as Precision Medicine becomes the primary delivery of healthcare. This impacts not just researchers and clinicians but the general public as healthcare consumers.

When: September 21, 1:00pm Pacific Time, Noon Alaska Time, 2:00pm Mountain Time (more…)