Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NTO | Contact NTO | NTO Feedback | Help | Bookmark and Share

Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is a series of 90 minute classes. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module. Each segment is eligible for 1.5 MLA Continuing Education hours. CE credit is not available for viewing the recording.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture
  • Discovering TOXNET®

    Discover TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises in thirteen independent modules. The independent modules cover TOXLINE, ChemIDplus, TRI, TOXMAP, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, IRIS, and more.

    Discovering TOXNET®

    Discovering TOXNET® Picture

MedlinePlus Now on Facebook

The National Library of Medicine has launched MedlinePlus Facebook pages. You can find them at https://facebook.com/mplus.gov (English) and https://facebook.com/medlineplusenespanol (Spanish).

MedlinePlus on Facebook

Adults Seeking Health Information Online

More and more U.S. adults are turning to the Internet for health information. A recent graph published in MMWR by the CDC shows that during 2012-2014, 33-49% of adults reported looking up health information on the Internet during the previous 12 months. The percentage was highest among adult residents of large fringe metropolitan counties and lowest among adult residents of rural counties. Where did people go to find this information? According to the Pew Research Center, “73% of all those ages 16 and over say libraries contribute to people finding the health information they need.” There is little question that librarians of all types will continue to play a role in helping to connect users to the health information they desire.

Your Regional Medical Library is a great source of ideas and training on how to help your users locate the authoritative information they need through National Library of Medicine resources and databases. And, the National Library of Medicine Training Center provides in-person and online training to keep your knowledge and skills up-to-date. Check out the calendar of upcoming training events you might be able to take advantage of in the new year. A number of self-paced tutorials and recordings from selected training sessions, including PubMed and TOXNET, and also available. Man with laptop drinking coffee in a cafe

Show Me the MeSH Terms

Watch this short video to learn how to setup an alert to follow a single citation and get notified when MeSH terms are applied.

An early holiday gift from the National Library of Medicine!

SIS app Bohr Thru You may know that the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has a number of resources related to environmental health and toxicology, including the suite of databases which are included as a part of TOXNET. NLM also has a number of resources on these topics which are specifically designed for the K-12 audience and the teachers and parents who work with these students. NLM’s Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) is pleased to announce the launch of three interactive, educational iOS apps for middle and high school students studying biology, chemistry and environmental health.

These FREE, readily accessible resources assist students with grasping concepts such as DNA base pairing, the Bohr model of the atom and environmental conservation. Two of the iOS apps, Bohr Thru and Base Chase, were developed in collaboration with a high school educator and are easily usable within the biology/chemistry classroom setting. The third game, Run4Green, is a fun and informative learning tool that reinforces concepts relating to environmental conservation and can be used as an engagement extension activity.

Each of the three iOS games is iPhone, iPad and iPod touch compatible, and can be freely downloaded (with no in-game purchases) by visiting the iTunes App Store. Bohr Thru is a Candy Crush style game which requires players to collect and organize protons, neutrons, and electrons in order to form the Bohr Model of the first 18 elements in the Periodic Table. Base Chase allows players to grab bases of DNA in order to complete unique DNA stands for a variety of animals. This game compliments the GeneEd website. Run4Green is especially designed for grades 5-8 and reinforces environmental topics such as greenhouse gas reduction, renewable energies, and green product purchases.

How to Handle the 3rd Degree

I recently attended an all-day workshop presented by Pinnacle Performance Company. They work with high-profile presenters (and me) to perfect their presentation techniques. Here are three tips for handling audience questions:

1) Make certain you’re ready to answer. Avoid verbal viruses (ex. um), especially when beginning an answer. If you need time to think or get your thoughts in order, repeating the question can buy valuable time.

2) Don’t tackle questions for which you don’t have an answer. There’s nothing wrong with admitting you don’t know something, as long as you pledge to research the answer and provide a timetable for providing it.

3) Use your audience, a.k.a. crowd sourcing. Soliciting other opinions and feedback is a great way to facilitate discussion and take the heat off you for a bit. This is obviously not something you can do for every question, and you have to know when to take the focus back, but it can really pay off.

Face2Face: Using Social Media in Libraries

social media iconsFor some time now, libraries and librarians of all types and stripes have been utilizing a variety of social media platforms for a variety of purposes. This past week I had the opportunity to attend the Library Marketing and Communications Conference, where David Lee King was a keynote speaker on the topic: “Face2Face: Social Media for Customer Connections.”

Here are a few of my takeaways from that presentation, which I hope may also give you some things to consider as you develop and implement social media within your own library.

  • Think of the library’s website as the “digital branch” of the library.
  • Just because they’re all there doesn’t mean we should be there. (That is, don’t be compelled to have a presence on a particular social media platform just because everyone else seems to be using it.)
  • Listen – and respond – to what is being said on social media: who is saying it, what they are saying, and where they are saying it. If comments are directed specifically to you (or your library), listen carefully first. If your “critics” are speaking, silence may be the best response. And, don’t forget to say thank you when appropriate.
  • Communication in an online environment should use a conversational writing style – think “business casual.” Aim to sound friendly but professional at the same time. “Type like you talk.” And, use images and/or video whenever possible.
  • Think of social media as a community. Just start talking in the online environment: ask questions, listen, and respond.
  • Consider Twitter for: “What is happening now?” and Facebook for “What just happened?” That is, a different focus for different platforms.
  • Above all – have a plan! Set goals and a strategy and measure your success!

If you’re interested in more on this topic, David Lee King has also published a book on this topic.

Photo credit: www.graphicdesignsinspiration.com

2016 MeSH: This is what the future looks like

The default year in the MeSH Browser (the browser versus the database many of us use each day) remains 2015 MeSH for now, but there is an alternate link that provides access to 2016 MeSH.

Access to two years of MeSH vocabulary is always available in the MeSH Browser, the current year and an alternate year. Sometime in November or December, the default year will change to 2016 MeSH and the alternate link to the 2015 MeSH.

More updates and download information about 2016 MeSH are forthcoming. Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin here.

2016 MeSH Browser

 

The Cycle of Reflective Teaching

As the National Library of Medicine Training Center, we think a lot about things like: how can we make this presentation better; are we really reaching our audience; are we teaching or training; and other similar topics. In fact, every time we get ready to teach another session of a class we’ve taught multiple times before, we make revisions and tweaks to (hopefully) keep making it better.

This week, I came across a blog post by two writers who have been guest experts for Twitter chats sponsored by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development entitled, “The Cycle of Reflective Teaching.” This first sentence jumped out at me: “The more reflective you are, the more effective you are.” If this is true, and self-reflection is a skill that can and should be developed, how do we do that? While authors Pete Hall and Alisa Simeral target primarily those who teach in K-12 settings, there might be something here for all of us who do any type of training or teaching.

Here’s a summary of their key points:

1.) Stop. “We’re doing without really thinking about what we’re doing.”

2.) Practice. “Thinking about your work, as an act unto itself, will not singlehandedly make you a more reflective and effective educator.” Hall and Simeral outline the four steps of the Reflective Cycle.

3. ) Collaborate. “This work is far too complex, and far too important, to go it alone.”

If this topic piques your interest, read more in the full blog post or check out their book titled, Teach, Reflect, Learn: Building Your Capacity for Success in the Classroom.”

For me, I think I’ll keep thinking about my next class when I take my walk today.

What’s the answer? Try Google Forms to find out.

I usually use SurveyMonkey to create questionnaires, but this time I used Google Forms and I’m testing it out on our website. You do not need a Google account to try it.

REMM: New Design with Significant Content Updates

Capture_REMM Update_Oct2015The Radiation Emergency Medical Management Team is proud to announce the first major redesign of its site since REMM was launched in 2007. The redesign includes a more modern banner, a new color palette and font style, and a new navigation system.

There are now six content groups on the new home page and an easy-to-use navigational menu has been added with sections for:
• Interactive Clinical Tools
• Diagnosis and Treatment
• Reference and Data
• Overview of REMM and
• Links to downloading the REMM app for various mobile devices
One of the most popular features, the Multimedia Library in carousel form, remains on the home page, with several categories of multimedia assets.

Many significant content updates have been added to the website, including: new references in several sections, updates to a number of pages, a new email update system, and more.

All prior URLs have been retained. Users who have previously visited REMM pages may need to refresh (reload) the page to see the new design.

REMM is included as one of the resources in the NTC modular course “Discovering TOXNET.”