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Band Name or MeSH Term? A game based on the 2017 Medical Subject Headings

2017 MeSH terms have been revealed and among them are molecules, philosophies and vices. Some of us here at the NTO geek out more than a little about the annual list of added and redacted medical subject headings, and this year we’d like to share that geekery with a game we’re calling: Band Name or MeSH Term?

Band Name or MeSH Term? 2017 edition

Is the following a medical subject heading, a band or both? Answers after the jump

  1. Sexual Minorities
  2. Tetralogy of Fallot
  3. Anthrax
  4. Cancer
  5. Morgue
  6. Spinal Tap
  7. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  8. Morphine
  9. Wolfiporia

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Teach Them What They Don’t Want to Know. A report from the field.

Recently, I taught a PubMed class at the public library targeted at clinicians. For almost a year I kept a folder at my desk (yes, a manila folder) that I would add notes that I scribbled on paper about content for the class. I had well over an hour of material and an hour and fifteen minutes to present it in. I reserved the computer lab (for free) and set out to drum up some attendees (seats 10). I am lucky enough to have the headquarters for the American Academy of Family Physicians in my town, so I gave them a call. I also tapped a doctor friend, who sent the class announcement to some well-placed medical educators. Seven RSVPs. Woo hoo! I am good to go. On the week of the class, I sent out a reminder. One email bounced back to me as “undeliverable”. The person no longer worked there. Uh oh. A second person responded that they wouldn’t be able to make it after all. OK, now I’m down to five. In the end, I had two people attend; a Pediatric Nephrologist and a Pediatric Nurse Clinician. Two is more than zero. Remember that kids.

I scheduled the session from 6:30-7:45 (closing time for the lab) and now here’s the part where I boldly went where not all go…I also scheduled a 30-minute optional session from 6-6:30. I advertised this as a time to sign up for a My NCBI account. I’ve heard from so many librarians that doctors, nurses and students don’t want to take the time to create a My NCBI account; it’s just another username and password they have to remember. I said, tough (to myself). Part of learning how to use PubMed to your advantage includes creating a My NCBI account. The good news for my small group was that the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC) is on the list of 3rd party sign-in options found on the My NCBI login page. All they had to do was remember their KUMC login credentials, which they use every day. This made them happy.
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A Cornucopia of Classes

Preserve! by Housh, ca. 1917-1919

Preserve! by Housh, ca. 1917-1919

We’ve re-stocked our online course pantry for November and December with some old favorites and one fresh selection that’s vegetarian friendly. Read about and register for free upcoming classes from NTO and NN/LM after the jump.

Image from the Library Company of Philadelphia

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Together, they’re stronger: Feedly and Google Keep

I didn’t even know what I had. I knew I had a Feedly account and I knew I used Google Keep; add them together and the sum is greater than the parts. Feedly is a free, online tool used to aggregate your blog feeds. Google Keep is like an online bulletin board to which you can “stick” notes. If you use the Chrome browser, you can install a browser extension for Keep and when you see something on the Internet you want to save, just click the Keep extension. All videos were produced by Richard Byrne I’ve included three videos: 1) How to use Google Keep 2) How to use Feedly and 3) How to use the two tools together.

Here’s a short video on how to use Google Keep

 
Here’s a video about how to use Feedly

Here’s a video about how to use Feedly and Google Keep together

5 Gorgeous Depictions of Bloom’s Taxonomy

(Diagram 1.1, Wilson, Leslie O. 2001)

Image from http://thesecondprinciple.com

Bloom’s taxonomy is a way of classifying levels of expertise in order to create measurable instructional outcomes. Created by a group of educators  in 1956, the taxonomy consists of 6 levels ranging from basic knowledge to master evaluation. The taxonomy was revised in 2001 by a group of educational psychologists led by Lorin Anderson and David Krathwohl, in order to reflect different types and levels of knowledge and take into consideration criticisms of the original taxonomy. The development of Bloom’s Taxonomy is quite long and populated with cognitive psychologists. Here’s a good backstory.

The bottom line for library-educators: Bloom’s offers a myriad of useful action verbs and prompts for which to create learning objectives. Pretty pictures and action words after the jump. Read more »