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Archive for the ‘Training Tips’ Category

In Case You Missed It

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015

Here are some of the most popular links we shared on Twitter in the last few months. You can follow us on Twitter (@nnlmntc) for even more tips on NLM resources, teaching or training, presentations, and more.

Housekeeping!

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

Housekeeping details at the beginning of a class can seem a bit boring, but covering them is an important step in making your audience comfortable, especially if the training is more than an hour. So what should you include to make sure the basics are covered?

1. The Schedule: When does the training begin and end? When are the breaks? Is there a lunch break? How long is it? Knowing the schedule allows students to concentrate on the class. They’ll know when is the best time to get coffee, make a call, or attend to personal needs and may be less likely to step out of the classroom and miss an important concept.

2. Restrooms: Always include the location of the nearest restrooms, especially if participants are not familiar with the location.

3. Questions: Encourage your students to ask questions along the way. This gives you the opportunity to clear up misconceptions or fill in gaps right away, and allows the learner to move forward in the class.

For more ideas on what to include in your housekeeping details, visit the Langevin Learning blog.

Welcome to the (Virtual) Class

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

Welcome Door Mat

Are you adding virtual classes to your teaching repertoire? When starting to teach online, you might miss some of the face-to-face interaction that you’ve previously enjoyed with your students. Building rapport in the online classroom doesn’t have to be all that different than traditional instruction. Here a few things you can do to create a friendly environment online, even if you might not be able to share your warm smile with your class participants.

  • Welcome students as they enter the room, by name if possible.
  • Conduct a brief warm-up activity. The warm-up can familiarize students with the conferencing software, draw on pre-course readings, or help participants get to know each other.
  • Show enthusiasm and excitement for the class using your voice or feedback icons.

For additional tips, see this short checklist from Langevin Learning Services.

Sticky Teaching

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

How do you take advantage of the way the brain works to make what you’re teaching stick? Check out this short SlideShare from Chris Lema on The ABC’s of Sticky Teaching.

Writing for the Ear

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Recently, I downloaded a copy of No More Spilled Ink: Writing for Instructional Design by Connie Malamed. I recommend the free resource as a great guide if you’re writing content for any kind of online learning.

One section of the guide addresses writing audio scripts, and I thought I’d share a few of Malamed’s tips here, and use them to evaluate an audio script that I recently wrote for a short tutorial.

  • Tip 1: Write like you speak. This means using short sentences, everyday words, and contractions.
  • Tip 2: Keep it brief. Consider how much your audience can process at once and avoid overloading them.
  • Tip 3: Repeat key points. Use emphasis or new wording to help the learner understand.
  • Tip 4: Notate silence. A pause give learners processing time and keeps you from rushing.

So how does my script measure up?

I think my script sounds pretty close to my natural language. I’ve used contractions, such as “let’s” and “don’t”, my sentences are relatively short and straightforward. I have incorporated a few words of jargon, so I’ll review to make sure that they make sense to my intended audience. The script is brief (about 2 minutes) because I narrowed the topic ahead of time. I was tempted to explain a much larger concept, but decided to keep it tightly focused. However, I did not use any of my time to repeat key points. As I revise, I’ll consider adding a sentence that summarizes the take-home message. Finally, notating silence. I’ve never done this before, but I think it’s a great tip because I often find myself speaking more quickly than I would with a face-to-face audience. I seem to forget to pause and breathe, so I think putting the breaks in the script will help me find a more relaxed rhythm.

Check out the full version of the guide for more great tips!