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Archive for the ‘Presentations’ Category

Need to Make a Timeline?

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

Stephanie Evergreen of Evergreen Data wrote a helpful article about 4 ways to create a timeline. You can read her blog post here: http://stephanieevergreen.com/timelines-4-ways/

In her post, Stephanie referenced a free PowerPoint plug-in, which you can get here: https://www.officetimeline.com/download

Watch how to make a timeline with the plug-in.

Sometimes, zero isn’t everything

Monday, June 27th, 2016

Did you attend MLA 2016 in Toronto? Did you hear Dr. Ben Goldacre give the McGovern Lecture?  One of the things he spoke about was representing statistics in charts and that pesky Y axis. The YouTube video below does not contradict Goldacre, but shows how sometimes zero can get in the way.

Systematic Reviews and PubMed Health

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

PubMed Health logo

Are you interested in clinical effectiveness? Do you have a desire or need to keep up-to-date on information related to the prevention and treatment of diseases or conditions? Have you taken a look at PubMed Health recently?

PubMed Health specializes in reviews of clinical effectiveness research, with easy-to-read summaries for consumers as well as full technical reports for researchers and clinicians. To state it simply, clinical effectiveness research seeks to answer the question, “What works?” in medical and health care.

PubMed Health is a service provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at NLM, in partnership with a number of other institutions including AHRQ, Cochrane, NHLBI and NCI at NIH. In addition to the great information on health topics from A-Z, drugs from A-Z, and more, PubMed Health offers ways to stay informed on the news with two RSS feeds: Featured Reviews and Behind the Headlines.

If you’d like to learn more about this fantastic resource and using it to find systematic reviews, register for the upcoming webinar on Friday, June 10. This free 30-minute webinar is provided by the NLM Training Office.

Try the new Q&A Feature in Google Slides for Engagement

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Have you tried Google Slides? I don’t use it on a regular basis, but I just learned about a new feature called Q & A. Q&A is designed to let audience members ask questions during a presentation (anonymously, if they prefer).

What’s so novel about that you ask? Students use their smartphone or other smart device to submit questions to the instructor at any point. OK, but what else can Q & A do? As questions are submitted via a shared URL, students “like” questions that they what to know the answer to. The instructor sees, in real-time, which questions are most important to the audience.

What are some ways to use the Q & A feature in Google Slides?

  • Can be used for in-person and online sessions
  • Fosters inclusion for remote participants
  • Students can ask questions when they come to mind
  • Gauge knowledge; Who knows what in the “room”?
  • Use instead of traditional chat box as a way to moderate chat
  • Meets users where they are, their smart-devices
  • Audience size doesn’t inhibit participation

Here’s a short video by Richard Byrne on how to use the tool. 

Adults Seeking Health Information Online

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

More and more U.S. adults are turning to the Internet for health information. A recent graph published in MMWR by the CDC shows that during 2012-2014, 33-49% of adults reported looking up health information on the Internet during the previous 12 months. The percentage was highest among adult residents of large fringe metropolitan counties and lowest among adult residents of rural counties. Where did people go to find this information? According to the Pew Research Center, “73% of all those ages 16 and over say libraries contribute to people finding the health information they need.” There is little question that librarians of all types will continue to play a role in helping to connect users to the health information they desire.

Your Regional Medical Library is a great source of ideas and training on how to help your users locate the authoritative information they need through National Library of Medicine resources and databases. And, the National Library of Medicine Training Center provides in-person and online training to keep your knowledge and skills up-to-date. Check out the calendar of upcoming training events you might be able to take advantage of in the new year. A number of self-paced tutorials and recordings from selected training sessions, including PubMed and TOXNET, and also available. Man with laptop drinking coffee in a cafe

How to Handle the 3rd Degree

Monday, November 16th, 2015

I recently attended an all-day workshop presented by Pinnacle Performance Company. They work with high-profile presenters (and me) to perfect their presentation techniques. Here are three tips for handling audience questions:

1) Make certain you’re ready to answer. Avoid verbal viruses (ex. um), especially when beginning an answer. If you need time to think or get your thoughts in order, repeating the question can buy valuable time.

2) Don’t tackle questions for which you don’t have an answer. There’s nothing wrong with admitting you don’t know something, as long as you pledge to research the answer and provide a timetable for providing it.

3) Use your audience, a.k.a. crowd sourcing. Soliciting other opinions and feedback is a great way to facilitate discussion and take the heat off you for a bit. This is obviously not something you can do for every question, and you have to know when to take the focus back, but it can really pay off.

The Cycle of Reflective Teaching

Friday, October 30th, 2015

As the National Library of Medicine Training Center, we think a lot about things like: how can we make this presentation better; are we really reaching our audience; are we teaching or training; and other similar topics. In fact, every time we get ready to teach another session of a class we’ve taught multiple times before, we make revisions and tweaks to (hopefully) keep making it better.

This week, I came across a blog post by two writers who have been guest experts for Twitter chats sponsored by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development entitled, “The Cycle of Reflective Teaching.” This first sentence jumped out at me: “The more reflective you are, the more effective you are.” If this is true, and self-reflection is a skill that can and should be developed, how do we do that? While authors Pete Hall and Alisa Simeral target primarily those who teach in K-12 settings, there might be something here for all of us who do any type of training or teaching.

Here’s a summary of their key points:

1.) Stop. “We’re doing without really thinking about what we’re doing.”

2.) Practice. “Thinking about your work, as an act unto itself, will not singlehandedly make you a more reflective and effective educator.” Hall and Simeral outline the four steps of the Reflective Cycle.

3. ) Collaborate. “This work is far too complex, and far too important, to go it alone.”

If this topic piques your interest, read more in the full blog post or check out their book titled, Teach, Reflect, Learn: Building Your Capacity for Success in the Classroom.”

For me, I think I’ll keep thinking about my next class when I take my walk today.

Top 100 Tools for Learning 2015

Wednesday, September 30th, 2015
top-100-tools-for-learning-2015-1-638NTC staff follow a number of blogs, online forums, listservs, and Twitter feeds related to learning and instruction. Jane Hart is a well-regarded international speaker and writer on modern approaches to workplace learning. Jane is the also the Founder of the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (C4LPT), one of the world’s most visited learning sites on the Web, where she also compiles the very popular annual Top 100 Tools for Learning list from the votes of learning professionals worldwide.  Her blog, Learning in the Social Workplace, was recently rated top of the 50 most socially shared Learning and Development blogs.

Recently, the blog published the Top 100 Tools for Learning for 2015. For the seventh year running Twitter is the Number 1 tool on the list, although this year it is very closely followed by YouTube, and, once again, the list is dominated by free online tools and services. Jane observes, “I can also see some interesting new trends in the tools that are being used for both personal learning and for creating learning content and experiences for others.”

Some “Big Movers” on the 2015 list – moved up sixteen or more places – including Skype, OneNote, SharePoint, and Kahoot. To read the full blog post, including the complete presentation of the 2015 list, visit:Top 100 Tools for Learning 2015.

An entertaining and helpful slide show re: presentation tips

Monday, September 7th, 2015

Here’s the direct URL to the presentation by Ian Trimble:

http://www.slideshare.net/itrimble/death-by-powerpoint-51110764

Running a Webinar or Online Meeting? Here’s a Checklist

Monday, April 20th, 2015

We’ve all attended good online meetings and bad online meetings. What qualities make for a good online meeting? Here is a short list of suggestions on how to run a successful online session.

  • Use a slide to let people know they’re in the right place
  • Acknowledge that people have arrived
  • Open up a “question of the day”. Nothing difficult; just something to engage and focus people while they’re waiting for the “show” to begin
  • Mute all participants. Yes, we want attendees to ask questions and make comments. No, we don’t want to hear papers rustling or conversations with co-workers who stop by to visit
  • Explain how to unmute
  • Orient participants to the interface and tools
  • To quote the Rolling Stones: “We all need someone we can lean on.” Arrange for someone to work with participants who are having trouble with audio, to read questions from the chat box, to start and stop the recording, etc.

And…in case you haven’t seen the video that depicts common online webinar frustrations as portrayed in an in-person meeting, you can watch the 4 minute video below. Very funny and too true.