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Archive for the ‘Adult Learning Principles’ Category

Personal Motivation and Online Course Design

Monday, April 14th, 2014

From SHIFT’s eLearning blog: Designing for Motivation: Three Theories eLearning Designers Can Use 

1) Self-Determination Theory

This theory operates on the premise that learners are motivated by an inner belief that learning, in and of itself, is important. In this theory, learners tend to want some degree of control over their learning experience.

Applied to course design: Provide choices, opportunities to succeed and interaction options.

2) Flow Theory

Student motivation is intrinsic and drives learner behavior.

Applied to course design: Consistent and user-friendly course format; state clear objectives so learner can feel sense of achievement, reduce confusion so students can focus on the essentials.

3) Path-Goal Theory

In this theory, the teacher develops a user-friendly course that provides a path to success. The teacher provides student support and creates opportunities for the student to participate with meaningful content that encourages the student to persevere.

Applied to course design: Provide clear instructions; create a blueprint for students to follow to achieve success.

Read the full article here:  http://ow.ly/vyDs5

Human Factors

Monday, February 24th, 2014

Technology; most of us have a love/hate relationship with it.  But wouldn’t it be great if we had a love/love relationship with technology? Specifically, love for an online course we might take or even develop. Karla Gutierrez of SHIFT’s eLearning Blog recently posted an article titled: Bridging the Gap Between Human Learners and eLearning Technology. Gutierrez pointed to 4 “human factors” to consider when designing an online class. Also, as students, we intrinsically want these factors to be present.

I’ve pulled some excerpts from Gutierrez’s article. Just reading about human centered design made me feel more at ease.

1) The human brain prefers to recognize, not recall. Learners should not have to spend more time trying to remember how to navigate from one page to another, than they do engaging in learning the material.

2) The human brain likes chunking by seven. Requiring learners to grasp too many concepts at one time can cause them to “drop” that information.

3) The human brain likes to organize information.The proper placement of information can help learners recall knowledge when they need it.

4) The human brain likes patterns.  Use consistent screen design.

The U.S. government has a website about user experience design principles called: http://www.usability.gov

Here is a link to a section called User Experience Basics:  http://www.usability.gov/what-and-why/user-experience.html 

Read the entire article herehttp://goo.gl/MVvsLt

 

 

 

Effective Teaching Behaviors

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

What are some effective teaching behaviors that we can incorporate into our classes for learners of all types?  A post from the “Tomorrow’s Professor” mailing list, sponsored by the Stanford Center for Teaching and Learning, discussed eight behaviors to consider.   The behaviors that particularly intrigued me were:

“Teach for Understanding Rather Than Exposure”:  determine the “big ideas” behind the class

“Explicit Instruction”:  Tell students what they are going to learn, the rationale for learning the material, and how new material relates to what they already learned.

Scaffolded Instruction”:  The three stages of scaffolded instruction are:  1) Students watch the teacher perform a task; 2) teacher and student do the task together; 3) student does it alone.

“Errorless Learning”: Present the material using smaller steps so that students can achieve success without errors.

You can read the full article here.

 

Flipping the Flipped Classroom

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

The flipped classroom has been all over education news for the past few years, but a recent study presents a new finding on flipping the classroom.

In the current model of a flipped classroom, students read or watch videos about a topic and then apply what they learned to solve problems or complete projects. A new study from the Stanford Graduate School of Education says that we might just have that backwards. In this study of graduate and undergraduate students, half the students first read about the neuroscience of vision, while the other half first used a simulation tool to manipulate and explore neural networks. Then, each group of students did the other task. At the end, the students took a test and researchers found at 25-percent increase in performance in those who had the opportunity for exploration first. 

Paulo Blikstein, one of the study authors, says, “”We are showing that exploration, inquiry and problem solving are not just ‘nice to have’ things in classrooms. They are powerful learning mechanisms that increase performance by every measure we have.”

What do you think? Have you ever considered starting a class with some open-ended exploration? How did it work?

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Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

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