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Feature Slides

  • Discovering TOXNET®

    Discover TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises in thirteen independent modules. The independent modules cover TOXLINE, ChemIDplus, TRI, TOXMAP, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, IRIS, and more.

    Discovering TOXNET®

    Discovering TOXNET® Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is a series of 90 minute classes. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module. Each segment is eligible for 1.5 MLA Continuing Education hours. CE credit is not available for viewing the recording.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture

Registration is still open for Using ALTBIB: What, Why, and How (Thursday, Dec 8)

white laboratory animal mouse

Using ALTBIB: What, Why, and How

Thursday, December 8, 2016 – 1pm ET

Register: https://nnlm.gov/ntc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=1067

This one-hour webinar provides a basic introduction to the NLM Database ALTBIB: Resources for Alternatives to the Use of Live Vertebrates in Biomedical Research and Testing. We will describe the scope of ALTBIB, briefly explain the history of the database and why it exists, and demonstrate ALTBIB features. Participants will gain hands on experience with the tool with practice exercises, and leave the webinar with a sense of what ALTBIB can and cannot do for animal alternative searches. This free webinar is approved for 1 MLA continuing education credit.

Looking for a Guideline? Search AHRQ Guidelines with MeSH.

Here’s a short video that describes how to use MeSH terms to search for guidelines in the National Guideline Clearinghouse from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).https://www.guidelines.gov/

PubMed for Librarians 2017 – registration is open

PML_slide_imageRegistration is now open for the next round of our highly popular PubMed For Librarians series.

The PubMed for Librarians class is divided into six segments (90 minutes each). Each segment is a synchronous online session that includes hands-on exercises and is worth 1.5 hours of MLA CE credit. Participants can choose any or all of the 6 segments that interest them.

The segments are as follows:

Introduction to PubMed: Learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a PubMed search, assess your search retrieval, analyze search details, employ three ways to search for a known citation, and how to customize with My NCBI.

MeSH (Medical Subject Headings): Learn about the NLM Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database. Explore the four different types of MeSH terms and how searchers can benefit from using MeSH to build a search. Investigate the structure of the MeSH database and look at the components of a MeSH record.

Automatic Term Mapping (ATM): Learn about Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) – the process that maps keywords from your PubMed search to the controlled vocabulary of the MeSH database. Learn why searching with keywords in PubMed can be an effective approach to searching. Look at the explosion feature, what is and is not included in search details, and explore how PubMed processes phrases.

Building and Refining Your Search: Use some of the tools and features built into PubMed that are designed to help you search more effectively. Explore the filters sidebar and Topic-Specific Queries. Use History, tools in the NLM Catalog, and the Advanced Search Builder to build searches and explore topics.

Using Evidence-Based Search Features: Explore terminology used for indexing study design in PubMed, explore 3 PubMed products that facilitate evidence based searching, and learn how to customize My NCBI Filters to quickly locate specific publication types.

Customization – My NCBI: Learn about the advantages of creating a My NCBI account, managing and manipulating your My NCBI page content, locating and identifying available filters on PubMed’s filter sidebar, selecting and setting up to fifteen filters, and creating a custom filter.

Space is limited, register now at http://nnlm.gov/training-schedule/all/NTC

All about the new MeSH browser

If you’ve spent any time among medical librarians, you’ve probably heard the term MeSH tossed about. MeSH stands for medical subject headings, the National Library of Medicine’s controlled vocabulary thesaurus. In PubMed, MeSH is used to describe research articles. Likewise, you can use the MeSH database in PubMed to build very specific searches. But there is another, separate resource called The MeSH Browser – and it has been totally rebuilt with a design upgrade that enhances term discovery and, in general, is easier on the eyes.

First, a moment of silence for the MeSH Browsers of old:

Mesh Browser ca. 2002

Mesh Browser ca. 2002

 

MeSH browser ca. 2015

MeSH browser ca. 2015

 

Here’s what’s new:

A: Top navigation bar on every page

B: Search box

C: Search options for FullWord (looks for complete words only) or SubString (searches for a string of characters that are a complete term or are within a sentence or within another word)

D: Sort by Relevance or Alphabetically

E: Display many results or just a few

Want to know more? The NLM Technical Bulletin from Nov-Dec 2016 has extensive details.

Link to MeSH Browser

The National Library of Medicine welcomes feedback on the new MeSH browser. Submit here.

Mental health texts from @medlineplus

The National Library of Medicine has launched a MedlinePlus text messaging campaign on holiday mental health issues : Anxiety, Depression, and Stress. 

Users that sign-up for the campaign will receive 3 text messages per week through the holidays on mental health support, such as managing anxiety, coping with depression, and preventing stress during the holiday season.

Users can subscribe by texting MP Health to 468311 or by signing-up online: http://bit.ly/2eDe91j

mtextmessaging

Band Name or MeSH Term? A game based on the 2017 Medical Subject Headings

Seeing the Unseen Poster

Image from NLM collections

The 2017 MeSH terms have been revealed and among them are molecules, philosophies and vices. Some of us here at the NTO geek out more than a little about the annual list of added and redacted medical subject headings, and this year we’d like to share that geekery with a game we’re calling: Band Name or MeSH Term?

Band Name or MeSH Term? 2017 edition

Is the following a medical subject heading, a band or both? Answers after the jump

  1. Sexual Minorities
  2. Tetralogy of Fallot
  3. Anthrax
  4. Cancer
  5. Morgue
  6. Spinal Tap
  7. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  8. Morphine
  9. Wolfiporia

Read more »

Teach Them What They Don’t Want to Know. A report from the field.

Recently, I taught a PubMed class at the public library targeted at clinicians. For almost a year I kept a folder at my desk (yes, a manila folder) that I would add notes that I scribbled on paper about content for the class. I had well over an hour of material and an hour and fifteen minutes to present it in. I reserved the computer lab (for free) and set out to drum up some attendees (seats 10). I am lucky enough to have the headquarters for the American Academy of Family Physicians in my town, so I gave them a call. I also tapped a doctor friend, who sent the class announcement to some well-placed medical educators. Seven RSVPs. Woo hoo! I am good to go. On the week of the class, I sent out a reminder. One email bounced back to me as “undeliverable”. The person no longer worked there. Uh oh. A second person responded that they wouldn’t be able to make it after all. OK, now I’m down to five. In the end, I had two people attend; a Pediatric Nephrologist and a Pediatric Nurse Clinician. Two is more than zero. Remember that kids.

I scheduled the session from 6:30-7:45 (closing time for the lab) and now here’s the part where I boldly went where not all go…I also scheduled a 30-minute optional session from 6-6:30. I advertised this as a time to sign up for a My NCBI account. I’ve heard from so many librarians that doctors, nurses and students don’t want to take the time to create a My NCBI account; it’s just another username and password they have to remember. I said, tough (to myself). Part of learning how to use PubMed to your advantage includes creating a My NCBI account. The good news for my small group was that the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC) is on the list of 3rd party sign-in options found on the My NCBI login page. All they had to do was remember their KUMC login credentials, which they use every day. This made them happy.
Read more »

A Cornucopia of Classes

Preserve! by Housh, ca. 1917-1919

Preserve! by Housh, ca. 1917-1919

We’ve re-stocked our online course pantry for November and December with some old favorites and one fresh selection that’s vegetarian friendly. Read about and register for free upcoming classes from NTO and NN/LM after the jump.

Image from the Library Company of Philadelphia

Read more »

Together, they’re stronger: Feedly and Google Keep

I didn’t even know what I had. I knew I had a Feedly account and I knew I used Google Keep; add them together and the sum is greater than the parts. Feedly is a free, online tool used to aggregate your blog feeds. Google Keep is like an online bulletin board to which you can “stick” notes. If you use the Chrome browser, you can install a browser extension for Keep and when you see something on the Internet you want to save, just click the Keep extension. All videos were produced by Richard Byrne I’ve included three videos: 1) How to use Google Keep 2) How to use Feedly and 3) How to use the two tools together.

Here’s a short video on how to use Google Keep

 
Here’s a video about how to use Feedly

Here’s a video about how to use Feedly and Google Keep together

5 Gorgeous Depictions of Bloom’s Taxonomy

(Diagram 1.1, Wilson, Leslie O. 2001)

Image from http://thesecondprinciple.com

Bloom’s taxonomy is a way of classifying levels of expertise in order to create measurable instructional outcomes. Created by a group of educators  in 1956, the taxonomy consists of 6 levels ranging from basic knowledge to master evaluation. The taxonomy was revised in 2001 by a group of educational psychologists led by Lorin Anderson and David Krathwohl, in order to reflect different types and levels of knowledge and take into consideration criticisms of the original taxonomy. The development of Bloom’s Taxonomy is quite long and populated with cognitive psychologists. Here’s a good backstory.

The bottom line for library-educators: Bloom’s offers a myriad of useful action verbs and prompts for which to create learning objectives. Pretty pictures and action words after the jump. Read more »