Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About MCR | Contact MCR | Feedback | Help | Bookmark and Share

Education – Breezing Along with the RML and Discover Recordings now available

Breezing Along with the RML – July 20, 2016

Librarians Involved in EHRs: This session features three librarians–Erica Lake, University of Utah; Kelsey Leonard, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Meghan Evans, Geisinger Health System–discuss opportunities and challenges for librarians to be involved in supporting clinical care through Electronic Health Record Systems. Panelists will discuss their current projects, how their library got involved with their EHR, and suggestions for how viewers can start a similar process at their own institutions.

View archived recording at: goo.gl/t5YsVr

Discover NLM Resources and More – Health Information Resources for Seniors – July 27, 2016

As America’s 65-and-over population potentially doubles in the next 35-years, knowing where to find reliable information about senior health will be crucial. This webinar will demonstrate senior health resources from the National Library of Medicine and other centers that address needs at various ages and levels of health. Participants will learn about the sites, how to navigate them, and ways to promote and teach them to senior populations and caregivers.

View the archived recording at: goo.gl/3cfft6

NCBI Change to HTTPS Affects API Users

If you use NCBI only through a Web browser (like Safari, Firefox, Chrome, Internet Explorer, Opera, etc.), NCBI’s change will not noticeably affect you. The only change you should notice after the deadline is that a green lock icon should appear inside the box, and the web addresses of the NCBI pages you visit will start with https://.

If you or those at your institution maintain software that uses NCBI APIs or accesses NCBI servers through the Web, you should review instructions prepared by NCBI and act before the deadline (Sept 30, 2016) to ensure uninterrupted service.

NLM is making this change to improve security and privacy, and by Federal government mandate. /ch

Libraries Responding to Crises

From the DISASTR-OUTREACH-LIB email list:

Did you know libraries can play an active role in a community’s response to a crisis? They can provide information about local events and services, create reading lists and research guides, and offer less-traditional services to their communities in the wake of tragedy.  Even the simplest gesture can have meaning.

If your library wants to help your community process recent events, but is unsure how to begin, you might find inspiration in two recent articles. Community discussion spaces, moments of silence, counseling, lectures, LibGuides, and teen reading lists—there are ideas for everyone:

For more resources, see our guide to coping with disasters, violence, and traumatic events (https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/coping.html) or explore the materials in our Disaster Lit® database. If you have not already joined, you can register for email updates (via GovDelivery: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNLMDIMRC/subscriber/new) or join our email discussion list (https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/dimrclistserv.html).

If you are interested in getting involved more deeply in disaster response, take a look at our Disaster Information Specialist program (https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/disasterinfospecialist.html) and consider taking one of the courses offered, or attending one of our monthly webinars.

Submitted by Robin Taylor, Librarian/Contractor Specialized Information Services Division, Disaster Information Management Research Center.

[jh]

Domain Change: Update Your MedlinePlus Links

MedlinePlus has changed its domain from www.nlm.gov/medlineplus to  https://medlineplus.gov. This change is effective for all page URLs on the English and Spanish MedlinePlus sites.

The previous URLs automatically redirect to the new URLs. However, we suggest updating MedlinePlus links on your Web site to point to the new domain for the English and Spanish sites at medlineplus.gov and medlineplus.gov/spanish. /da

New NIH funded biomedical data search engine prototype launched July 2016

Launched in July 2016, DataMed is a NIH funded biomedical data search engine that is currently in development.

Members of the data scientist community are encouraged to test and provide feedback.

DataMed’s an online tool for users to discover data sets across data repositories/aggregators and will possibly allow users to search beyond outside these boundaries sometime in the near future. DataMed indexes the core metadata available for most datasets.

DataMed works within the FAIR guiding principles (Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusability) of datasets and assists users to find datasets and information on how they can be accessed.

The number data repositories, selected by bioCADDIE (biomedical and healthCAre Data Discovery Index Ecosystem), in this early release represents a small portion of the biomedical data available. bioCADDIE requests the data science research community to make recommendations on which data repositories DataMed should cover next. (Make your suggestions here)

jb

Webinar: Important Changes to NCBI Web Protocols

Date and time: Wednesday, July 27, 2016. 10MT, 11CT

Register Here (attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2000297899730334722)

The next NCBI Minute will discuss NCBI’s upcoming switch to the secure HTTPS protocol. Through this NCBI Minute, you’ll learn how this change will affect your access to NCBI pages and services and what you should do to have a smooth transition.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. After the live presentation, the webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Any related materials will be accessible on the Webinars and Courses page; you can also learn about future webinars on this page. /ch

Summary of Evidence: Musculoskeletal Inflammation and Natural Products

Learn what the science says about musculoskeletal inflammation and natural products in the current issue of NCCIH Clinical Digest. Read more about the evidence base of tumeric, bromelain, willow bark, Omega-3 fatty acids, devil’s claw, ginger and thunder god vine in the treatment of conditions like osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and tendinitis. /da

Webinar: The Opportunities and Challenges of Using Systematic Reviews To Summarize Knowledge About “What Works” in Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Presented by: Kay Dickersin, Ph.D., Director, The Center for Clinical Trials and Evidence Synthesis Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

When: Monday, July 25, 2016, 11-12 MT, 12 -1 CT

Presented via NIH Videocast (videocast.nih.gov)

For planning purposes please register. (prevention.nih.gov/programs-events/medicine-mind-the-gap/registration)

Whether discussing priorities for comparative effectiveness research (CER) from a funder’s or researcher’s perspective, understanding knowledge gaps, or setting guidelines for care, systematic reviews of existing research hold the promise of scientifically summarizing “what works” at any point in time. Dr. Dickersin will review models of how systematic reviews are being used globally to plan, implement, and derive recommendations from CER. Dr. Dickersin will then review some of the existing challenges to using systematic reviews and methods being used to address these challenges.

Dr. Dickersin will accept questions about her presentation via email at prevention@mail.nih.gov and on Twitter with #NIHMtG.

For more information, contact the Office of Disease Prevention at prevention@mail.nih.gov.

If you require reasonable accommodations to participate in this event, contact Jonathan Hicks at jonathan.hicks@nih.gov or (301) 827-5564. Closed captioning will be provided. /ch

Call for Submissions to the Merge & Converge Tech Forum: Partnering with Technology Champions

Would you like to share your success story for collaborating with technology champions outside of the library?

The Merge & Converge Tech Forum Planning Group is looking for panelists who want to share their IT collaboration success stories as either a “technology therapy” for those of us struggling with new technology initiatives in our institutions or an inspiration to those of us looking for new and exciting ventures.  Have you participated in your college’s Learning Management System (LMS), integrated library resources in your hospital’s Electronic Health Record (EHR), collaborated on 3D printing/imaging, Big Data projects, instructional technologies, or other exciting tech projects?

If so, we want to hear from you and (if possible) your non-library technology collaborators! [NOTE: Some funding may be available to defray the cost of attendance for non-library personnel]

The Tech Forum will be taking place on Monday, October 24 from 3:30-5pm central time. The full conference schedule is available at http://midwestmla.org/conference2016/wordpress/program/schedule/

If you are interested in serving on this panel, please fill out the following form http://goo.gl/forms/QAtfslKYgSoDK34L2 by Monday, August 1, 2016. Submissions should be around 250 words or less. Panelists will be notified of acceptance by September 1, 2016.

/al

New Book Club

After three well received book discussion groups, our next iteration will start July 19th and will feature Karl Weick’s Managing the Unexpected: Resilient Performance in an Age of Uncertainty, 2007 edition.

While we feature specific chapters each week during this four week session, you are welcome to drop in anytime! Previous discussion groups have greatly benefitted from hearing other colleagues’ work experiences, and you needn’t have memorized each chapter to positively contribute.

Meetings will be held on the MCR Advocacy Adobe Connect page at https://webmeeting.nih.gov/mcradvocacy and will meet every Tuesday starting July 19th at 1pm MST and 2pm CST.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact darell.schmick@utah.edu or jonesbarb@health.missouri.edu. Hope to see you there!