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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

Resources for IBS Awareness Month

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness month. IBS is fairly common, though there are no specific tests for it, nor is there an exact cause. If you are looking to learn more about IBS, or promote information to help spread awareness, check out these resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and other reputable agencies to get started today!

Follow #IBS and #IBSAwarenessMonth on social media for the most up-to-date news during the month of April. Follow @NNLMMAR on Twitter and Like our Facebook page for more health information news and awareness, including opportunities for training and funding.

Resources for Diverse Populations for Alcohol Awareness Month

Thursday, April 13th, 2017

From the Specialized Information Services (SIS) Outreach and Special Populations branch:

Many Americans drink occasionally, and moderate drinking is probably safe for many people.  However, some people should not drink at all, including alcoholics, children, pregnant women, people taking certain medicines, and people with certain medical conditions.  April is Alcohol Awareness Month, and health professionals can find a variety of free online resources from National Library of Medicine (NLM) to help diverse populations learn more about responsible alcohol consumption:

  • General Public – Find reliable resources about alcohol, alcoholism and alcohol abuse on MedlinePlus, including links to basic information, prevention and risk factors, statistics, journal articles, health check tools, information for specific populations (men, women, teens, seniors), and more.
  • Multilingual Populations – Find documents, audio, and video in multiple languages related to alcohol on HealthReach.  Also find links to resources in multiple languages on alcoholism at MedlinePlus.
  • Individuals with HIV/AIDS – AIDSource provides links to reliable resources on how drug and alcohol use can impact the health of individuals with HIV/AIDS.

Over Diagnosis – Why Too Many Lab Tests are Bad for Your Health

Friday, April 7th, 2017

Join the South Central Region (SCR) for this upcoming webinar on Wednesday, April 12 at 12:00 PM ET.

Over diagnosis is an emerging concern among health care providers since it leads to unnecessary and potentially harmful over treatment. Over diagnosis occurs when people receive treatment for a disease or condition that won’t cause them symptoms or any eventual harm. It often develops from the widespread use of screening laboratory tests and from changing the laboratory threshold for disease states. This presentation focuses on the appropriate use and interpretation of screening laboratory tests, and those tests which should be questioned as medically necessary.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define over diagnosis and discuss its causes.
  2. Explain how over diagnosis can lead to patient harm.
  3. Describe how routine laboratory testing can contribute to over diagnosis.
  4. List common laboratory tests patients and doctors should question as medically necessary.

Speaker Bio: Janet Miles, MD is a pathologist with Propath LLC based in Dallas, Texas, and serves as the current Laboratory Medical Director for John Peter Smith Health Network in Fort Worth, Texas. She received her medical degree from the University of Missouri – Kansas City and completed residency and fellowship training at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Dr. Miles has 27 years of experience in the clinical laboratory field, and specializes in clinical laboratory administration, regulatory compliance, and quality management. She is board certified in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology and Neuropathology. She is a past recipient of the Kansas City Business Journal “Women Who Mean Business” and a fellow of the American College of Pathologists.

This webinar will be eligible for one hour of Medical Library Association (MLA) Continuing Education credit and will be archived for future viewing.

To Join the Meeting

  1. Go to WebEx.
  2. Enter the session number: 629 935 506 and password: webinar
  3. Please provide your name and email address.
  4. You may have to download and install a web add-on or run a temporary application depending on the browser you use.
  5. Select your audio connection preference:
    *Call in – Call: 1-877-668-4493 (US/Canada Toll-free)
    Enter access code: 629 935 506 #
    Enter the participant code on your screen and press #
    *Call using computer – Adjust settings and test the connection
  6. If you are using a mobile device, your access code is: webinar

View live captioning (link will open in a new browser window)

For any technical issues, please call: 817-735-2223.

For more information about this webinar, please visit the class details page.

Twitter Chats for Minority Health Month

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

April is National Minority Health Month. This year the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) and the Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health (OMH) have organized some amazing online events to help spread awareness of health disparities, and open discussions about minority health issues. Not sure where to start when it comes to learning about and promoting Minority Health topics? Check out some of the resources below.

Tomorrow! FDA Office of Minority Health: The Importance of Clinical Trials for Latinos – Bilingual Twitter Chat
April 4, 2017, 1:00 – 2:00 PM ET
Follow @FDAOMH and #SaludTues

HHS/Office of Minority Health: Bridge 2 Health Twitter Town Hall
April 12, 2017, 1:00 – 2:30 PM ET
Follow at #Bridge2Health

NIMHD Twitter Chat: Understanding Social and Environmental Determinants to Bridge Health Equity
April 25, 2017 2:00 – 3:00 PM ET
Follow at #HealthEquityChat

Minority Health resources from reputable government agencies

Apply now: NNLM MAR Health Professions Coordinator

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017

The University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) invites applications for the position of Health Professions Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM MAR). We are looking for an energetic, creative, innovative, and service-oriented individual interested in being part of a collaborative team that works together to improve access to and sharing of biomedical and health information resources, with an emphasis on resources produced by the National Library of Medicine. The Health Professions Coordinator has primary responsibility for designing and evaluating outreach and education programs, focusing on NLM resources and increasing access to biomedical and health information, directed toward community health professionals, minority health professionals and public health workers.

A complete position announcement including job responsibilities, qualifications, salary/benefits and where to apply may be viewed at: http://www.hsls.pitt.edu/about/positions/

 

 

ChooseMyPlate for National Nutrition Month

Friday, March 24th, 2017

March is National Nutrition Month! Did you know the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has an entire website dedicated to healthy eating? Here are just a few of the awesome resources you can find on ChooseMyPlate.gov:

Looking for MyPlate and other nutrition resources on social media? Follow:

New Member Services Open House

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

Are you new to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) or looking for a refresher on the many services the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) offers its members? Join MAR coordinators Lydia Collins and Elaina Vitale for this one-hour open house webinar!

April 20, 2017, 1:00-2:00 PM ET
Details and Registration

Attendees can expect to learn about appropriate resources, hear about MAR funding, and gather ideas for successful library/agency partnerships.

Not yet a Member? Fill out our application for membership today to qualify your organization for funding opportunities, free print and educational materials, opportunities for partnership, and so much more! Then register for this open house webinar, and bring your questions straight to our staff. We’re always happy to provide free consultations to organizations in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware.

For organizations in other states, find your region to learn what services are available to you!

Poison Prevention Week

Friday, March 17th, 2017

National Poison Prevention week is just around the corner, March 19-25. What can you do to help your colleagues, patients, or community members become educated about exposure to poison? Does your organization’s emergency plan include steps for poison prevention? Poison Help from the Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) has a wealth of programs and materials to share, including an interactive map to find poison centers in your state! Below are a few suggestions to get started on implementing a plan in your community or workplace.

In an emergency:

  • If you or someone you know may have been poisoned, call the toll-free Poison Help line right away at 1-800-222-1222, which connects you to your local poison center.
  • If the person is not breathing, call 911.
  • Do not wait for signs of a poisoning before calling the Poison Help line. When you call, you will speak with a poison expert at your poison center.
  • Use the HRSA emergency checklist to guide you on what information to tell the poison expert on the phone.

Also remember:

  • Do not panic. Not all medicines, chemicals, or household products are poisonous. Not all contact with poison results in poisoning.
  • Follow the advice you receive from your poison center.

Some additional first steps include:

  • If the person inhaled poison, get to fresh air right away.
  • If the person has poison on the skin, take off any clothing the poison touched. Rinse skin with running water for 15 to 20 minutes.
  • If the person has poison in the eyes, rinse eyes with running water for 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Your poison center can give you other first-aid advice and may save you from a visit to the emergency room.

Before an emergency happens, be prepared:

  • Follow HRSA tips for keeping the toll-free Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222), in a place where you can find it in an emergency.

 Help prevent poisonings:

Resources on Kidney Health

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

“Did you know? Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure. Almost half of people starting dialysis have kidney failure caused by diabetes. Diabetes can damage your kidneys. This damage can happen over many years, without you feeling it. But, even if you have diabetes, you can take steps to help keep your kidneys healthy.” –National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

The National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other government agencies have a wealth of health information resources online to help you educate yourself, your loved ones, your community, and/or your patients on healthy kidney function for National Kidney Month. Why not get started today?

Looking for more resources, or opportunities to get active for National Kidney Month? Contact us today to learn about training and other opportunities for outreach support.

Patient Safety Awareness Week

Monday, March 13th, 2017

It’s Patient Safety Awareness week, March 12-18. Whether you are a health care professional or a health care consumer, patient safety is an important topic to consider when it comes to health information. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), consumers can help prevent medical errors for themselves and their loved ones by:

  • Speaking up. Talk to your doctor about any questions or worries. Ask what they’re doing to protect you.
  • Keeping hands clean. Make sure everyone, including friends and family, clean their hands before touching you. If you don’t see your healthcare providers clean their hands, ask them to do so.
  • Preparing for surgery. Let your doctor know about any medical problems you have. Ask your doctor how he/she prevents surgical site infections.
  • Asking your healthcare provider, “Will there be a new needle, new syringe, and a new vial for this procedure or injection?” Insist that your healthcare providers never reuse a needle or syringe on more than one patient.
  • Getting Smart about antibiotics. Antibiotics only treat bacterial infections – they don’t work for viruses like the ones that cause colds and flu. Ask your healthcare provider if there are steps you can take to feel better without using antibiotics. If you’re prescribed an antibiotic, make sure to take the prescribed antibiotic exactly as your healthcare provider tells you and do not skip doses. and don’t forget to watch out for deadly diarrhea!
  • Knowing the signs and symptoms of infection. Some skin infections, such as MRSA, appear as redness, pain, or drainage at an IV catheter site or surgery site and come with a fever. Infections can also lead to sepsis, a complication caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection.
  • Getting Vaccinated. Getting yourself, family, friends, and caregivers vaccinated against the flu and other infections prevents spread of disease.
  • Covering your mouth and nose. When you sneeze or cough, germs can travel 3 feet or more. Use a tissue to avoid spreading germs with your hands.

Looking for more resources?

  • The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has some wonderful Patient Safety tools and resources to assist health professionals in creating a safe and open environment for patients.
  • MedlinePlus has a very informative Health Topics page on Patient Safety, including resources in English and Spanish.
  • The United Patient Safety Foundation has a large number of resources for getting involved in active patient safety awareness with the United Patient Safety campaign.
  • Use #PSAW2017 and #WeAreAllPatients to join the conversation on social media.
  • Follow @NNLMMAR on Twitter or like our Facebook page to see more Patient Safety resources all this week!