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Archive for the ‘Evaluation’ Category

Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

Save the Date!  The Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians will be held April 24-28, 2017 at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library, North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Applications for the Institute will be accepted beginning on Dec 12, 2016.

https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/datavizinstitute

The Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians is a week-long course providing the opportunity for librarians passionate about research and scholarship to immerse themselves in learning about data science and visualization in collaboration with academic peers. Participants will develop knowledge, skills, and confidence to communicate effectively with faculty and student researchers about their data and be able to provide initial consultancy on the course topics. Led by expert instructors, sessions will be interactive and will focus on mastery of core concepts, with hands-on exposure to select open source and highly used commercial tools. Sharing of practices and experiences across institutions will be encouraged.

A final schedule will be available in early December,  including topics such as:

  • Data Exploration and Statistical Analysis
  • Bibliometric Analysis
  • Data Visualization
  • Version Control with Git and GitHub
  • Data Description, Sharing, and Reuse
  • Data Cleaning and Preparation
  • Web scraping
  • Analyzing Textual Data
  • Mapping and Geospatial Visualization
  • Publisher and Funder Data Use Agreements

Visit their website to stay up-to-date on program details and to apply (beginning December 12, 2016).

The Data Science and Visualization Institute for Librarians is offered through a collaboration between the NCSU Libraries and the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI).

NIH Requests Information on Strategies for Data Management, Sharing and Citation

Monday, November 21st, 2016

From the Outreach and Special Populations Branch:

The NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts, NIH published a Request for Information (RFI) that seeks public comments on strategies for data management, sharing, and citation in order to consider:

  1. what, when, and how data should be managed and shared; and,
  2. setting standards for citing shared data and software.

The complete RFI, as well as instructions on how to comment, can be found on the NIH OSP website.  The final response date is December 29, 2016.  NIH will consider all public comments before taking next steps.

Additional information about the importance of this RFI can be found in an “Under the Poliscope” blog published today by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz, NIH Associate Director for Science Policy.

For more information, please contact the NIH Office of Science Policy by email at SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov or by telephone at 301-496-9838.

Request for Participation: NLM 4 Caregivers 2016 User Survey

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

Are you a family caregiver, or do you know or work with family caregivers?  Take the NLM 4 Caregivers 2016 User Survey, and help National Library of Medicine to identify the kinds of health information most needed by family caregivers and the best ways to share this information.

The survey can be accessed at the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HXXNLGV

Training Needs Assessment

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

From the NN/LM Training Office (NTO):

Learning: you do it every day because you’re curious and you want to stay informed. The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) can help you learn what you care about…and we’d like to do it on your terms.

Please complete our training needs assessment. By doing so, your responses will guide NN/LM in developing programs:

  • on the topics you want
  • at the right level
  • in a format that works for you

This needs assessment is being conducted by the NN/LM Training Office (NTO) and is estimated to take 10-15 minutes to complete. It will close on November 30, 2016. Your response is sincerely appreciated.

NLM Request for Information

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016

The National Library of Medicine is undertaking a Strategic Planning Process and is soliciting input from its broad stakeholder community, including our Network members. Please ensure that your feedback is included in our strategic visioning.

Response Date: January 9, 2017

Please direct all inquiries to:

Office of Health Information Programs Development
National Library of Medicine (NLM)
Telephone:  301-496-2311
Email relevant to this RFI: NLMStrategicPlan@nih.gov

NN/LM Resource Picks: Call for Survey Participation

Friday, October 28th, 2016

NN/LM Resource Picks is a collaborative webinar series produced by coordinators across the various regions of of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM). A session is offered every other month featuring a National Library of Medicine (NLM) resource as a way to promote awareness of the resource and encourage its usage and integration by libraries and other organizations.

In an upcoming session scheduled for March 29, 2017, the NLM Traveling Exhibition Program will be featured. To provide a more useful and informative presentation, the staff at the Traveling Exhibition Program have asked us to survey potential attendees to ask what they would like to know about this program. It would be greatly appreciated if anyone who may consider attending would take the time to answer a few questions regarding what you would find most beneficial about the NLM Traveling Exhibitions.

If you would like to contribute to the survey, please respond by November 18, 2016. We appreciate your feedback!

Research Data Management Education Modules

Thursday, August 18th, 2016

On behalf of Kevin Reed and Alisa Surkis, NYU School of Medicine:

We would like to request your participation in piloting research data management education materials for medical librarians. We are currently funded by a grant from the Big Data to Knowledge Initiative at NIH to develop a curriculum for medical librarians to facilitate their teaching research data management at their own institutions. There are two components to the training materials:

Part 1: Seven online modules (approximately three hours of content) designed to teach medical librarians about the practice and culture of research and best practices in research data management.

Part 2: A teaching toolkit including slides, scripts, and evaluation materials to teach an in-person introductory research data management class for researchers at your institution.

We are currently seeking participants to pilot part 1. Following that, we will seek out a subset of participants with whom to pilot part 2, which will involve structured observations of classes taught by the librarians at their institutions. All participants in piloting part 1 will be given access to the materials in part 2, regardless of whether or not they are part of the piloting of those materials.

My colleague, Alisa Surkis, and I have been teaching research data management to our fellow medical librarians at the past three MLA annual meetings, based on our own experiences in providing research data management services at NYU School of Medicine. We hope that the materials we have created here will make the core elements of that class more broadly available to facilitate the teaching of research data management at medical libraries across the United States.

If you intend to take these modules, please contact Kevin Read at kevin.read@med.nyu.edu or Alisa Surkis at alisa.surkis@med.nyu.edu to confirm your participation. You do not need to await a reply from us to begin taking the modules.  We are also available to answer your questions at any time.

New class! Make Your Point: Basic Principles of Data Visualization Design

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

NN/LM MAR, the National Evaluation Office and the Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey (HSLANJ) are pleased to offer this new one hour webinar.

Make Your Point: Basic Principles of Data Visualization Design

Data visualizations are everywhere these days: social media, infographics, data dashboards, and trendy organizational reports.  A good data visualization communicates dense amounts of information quickly and effectively.  A bad one is a hodgepodge that creates confusion. To create effective data visualizations, you need to know the basic principles of chart design. These principles apply whether you are using sophisticated data visualization technology or tried-and-true Excel. In this webinar, we will describe a process for developing a chart that helps you make your point without making a mess. (This webinar provides 1 credit of MLA continuing education.)

Time: 12:00 – 1:00 PM Eastern

Date: July 19

Location: Online webinar. Call-in instruction will be provided to registered participants a week prior to the training session.

Registration required:

https://nnlm.gov/evaluation/workshops/register.html?schedule_id=4015

Presenters:

Cindy Olney is the Assistant Director of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Evaluation Office (NEO, formally known at the NN/LM OERC).  She has been a program evaluator for more than 25 years.

Karen Vargas is the Evaluation Specialist of the NEO.  Prior to joining the office in February 2015, she was the Outreach and Evaluation Coordinator for NN/LM South Central Regional Medical Library, located in the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library.

 

Why Should You Attend the American Evaluation Association Summer Institute 2015?

Saturday, March 21st, 2015

Registration is now open for the American Evaluation Association’s annual Summer Evaluation Institute.  The Institute, held in Atlanta, runs for 2.5 days and features 26 half-day training sessions.   Here are five reasons I make a point of attending this Institute every year.

  • Great instructors. The training is offered by some of the most experienced evaluators in the field.
  • A continuing education bargain. Training costs about $80-90 per half-day session, less for students.
  • CDC presence. Historically, AEA co-sponsored this annual event with Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  While the CDC no longer co-sponsors the Institute, you will meet lots of CDC staff members and consultants.
  • Networking opportunities. Between lunch and breaks, you get eight opportunities to chat with your colleagues.
  • Great location. The Institute is held at the Crown Plaza Atlanta Perimeter at Ravinia, located in a park-like setting on Atlanta’s perimeter near shopping and restaurants. The hotel is on the MARTA (mass transit) red line, so you can get from the airport to the hotel without facing Atlanta’s legendary traffic. Because I live near Atlanta, I haven’t stayed in the hotel; but I’ve never heard any complaints.

Full-day pre-Institute workshops are held, for an additional charge, on the Sunday before the Institute. You can attend pre-conference sessions without registering for the Institute itself.  For example, beginners might want to take “Introduction to Evaluation” taught by Tom Chapel, the Chief Evaluation Officer at the CDC. Chapel organizes the workshop around the CDC’s six-step framework for program evaluation.

The AEA Institute 2015 runs June 1-3, with pre-session workshops conducted on May 31. The cost for the Institute is $395 for members and $480 for nonmembers, with a special student rate of $250. The price covers five training sessions (your choice among the 26 offerings), snacks, and lunch.  Pre-Institute workshops are an additional $150 (all participants).

What Shapes Health? A Story about Data Visualization

Friday, March 13th, 2015

This week on National Public Radio’s (NPR) All Things Considered was a story of what happened when Dr. Nancy Hardt, an OB-GYN, used data from Medicaid birth records to see where children were born into poverty in Gainesville, FL to try and identify ways to intervene and prevent poor childhood health outcomes. She was surprised to see a 1 square mile high-density ‘hot spot’ of births in dark blue appear in her map above. Dr. Hardt was encouraged to share her map with Sheriff Sadie Darnell, who pulled out a map of her own of Gainesville.

Sheriff Darnell’s map showed an exact overlay with the ‘hot spot’ on Dr. Hardt’s map of the highest crime rates in the city. By visiting the area they identified many things in the community that were barriers to good health including hunger, substandard housing, and a lack of medical care facilities – the closest location for uninsured patients was a 2 hour bus ride each way to the county health department. You’ll want to check out the rest of A Sheriff and A Doctor Team Up to Map Childhood Trauma to learn more about a mobile health clinic, what data from additional maps showed, and other steps they have taken since to help improve health outcomes for the community.

This story is the latest from the NPR series What Shapes Health, which was inspired in response to a recent Robert Wood Johnson Foundation poll about what beliefs and concerns Americans have regarding health. You can read an overview and download the full report of their results at http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2015/01/what-shapes-health.html.