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Heads-up: Two vacancies at NLM

From Joyce Backus, Associate Director for Library Operations, National Library of Medicine:

“NLM is looking for candidates to apply for these two vacancies, Chief of the Public Services Division and Head of the National Network Coordinating Office of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. Both are important leadership positions and we welcome candidates looking to contribute to NLM’s programs and mission as we move into the strategic planning process with our new Director, Patti Brennan.

For more information, refer to the NLM web site or watch these videos which briefly describe each of the programs and how to apply for a federal job.

Both jobs will be posted on USAJobs.gov, and linked on the NLM Job Openings page September 6-19, 2016.  Both are GS15 level positions, with a salary range of $128,082-$160,300.”

New webinar series: NN/LM Resource Picks

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine invites you to join us for a new bimonthly webinar series: NN/LM Resource Picks. Every two months, we will highlight National Library of Medicine resources. Learn about NLM resources directly from NN/LM and NLM staff!

First up:

Don’t Wait, Communicate About Disaster Preparedness!

September 28, 2016 3-4pm ET

Register: https://nnlm.gov/ntc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=1057

Twice a year, America’s PrepareAthon brings together organizations and individuals to

  • learn what hazards are most likely to affect their communities
  • take action to increase preparedness
  • participate in community resilience planning

The next America’s PrepareAthon takes place on September 30—the final day of National Preparedness Month. The theme this year is “Don’t Wait, Communicate: Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” https://www.ready.gov/september

The September 28 webinar will use themes from America’s PrepareAthon to demonstrate the role librarians play in disaster preparedness. Learn how to get your community ready for specific hazards, and find out what resources you have at your fingertips.

Presenter: Siobhan Champ-Blackwell, National Library of Medicine, Specialized Information Services Division, Disaster Information Management Research Center

Updated Self-Paced Disaster Information Specialization Courses

One of the core competencies of disaster medicine is knowing how to “identify authoritative sources for information in a disaster or public health emergency” (Source: National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health). Librarians and information professionals with this competency can support their communities with high-quality information throughout the disaster cycle of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.

The National Library of Medicine has developed a series of courses with an emphasis on disaster health information. NLM is updating the courses now and formatting them for self-paced study online.

Two updated courses are now available (see below). These courses meet the requirements for the Medical Library Association Disaster Information Specialization, as well as core competencies for public health professionals and others through the Public Health Foundation’s learning management system, TRAIN.

By the end of the year, there will be four more courses: US Response to Disasters and Public Health Emergencies; Information Roles in Disaster Management; A Seat at the Table: Working with Local Responders; and Health and Disasters: Understanding the International Context.

Disaster Health Information Sources: The Basics

This class provides a comprehensive overview of the essential resources needed to provide health-related information services for supporting disaster mitigation, planning, response, and recovery. This self-paced course introduces key sources from the National Library of Medicine, federal and nonfederal agencies, and international organizations. Tools for locating, organizing and disseminating disaster health information are covered.

https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/disastercourse_thebasics.html

CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive): Health Information Resources
This class provides an overview of the concepts of CBRNE, including a review of National Library of Medicine resources and tools that provide health-related information to support planning, response, and recovery from the effects of these potential hazards.

https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/disastercourse_cbrne.html

Resources on Precision Medicine through the National Library of Medicine

The new Director of National Library of Medicine (NLM) Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD puts a strong focus on precision medicine in the vision she describes for NLM:

I believe the National Library of Medicine has an important role to play in the Precision Medicine Initiative…and I believe that role’s going to be showing up in a number of the existing services already seen in the Library…

National Institutes of Health (NIH) defines precision medicine is “an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person.”

You can learn more about precision medicine and how NIH is already playing an important role in the Precision Medicine Initiative through a number of NLM resources:

New, weekly, webinar-based lecture series

BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science.

This is a series of high-level didactic overviews across the range of topics important for data science, intended to provide a general biomedical audience with an appreciation of the elemental issues related to data science research and applications.

When: each Friday at noon Eastern Time (9am Pacific) beginning September 9th, 2016.

Please join from your computer, tablet or smartphone: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/786506213

You may also dial in using your phone.
United States : +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 786-506-213

Registration is not required. Bookmark the webinar link for easy access to our weekly event!

The initial set of confirmed data science lecturers includes: Mark Musen (Stanford), William Hersh (Oregon Health Sciences), Lucila Ohno-Machado (UCSD), Michel Dumontier (Stanford), Zachary Ives (Penn), Suzanne Sansone (Oxford), Chaitan Baru (NSF), Brian Caffo (Johns Hopkins), and Naomi Elhadad (Columbia).

This series is sponsored by the NIH Office of the Associate Director for Data Science, the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Training Coordination Center, and the BD2K Centers Coordination Center. A dedicated webpage with additional information, the complete schedule of speakers, and a collection of all the recorded lectures is forthcoming and will be available shortly. In the meantime, the data science topics to be covered by our incredible set of speakers are as follows:

Syllabus

  • Introduction to big data and the data lifecycle
  • Section 1: Data Management Overview
  • Finding and accessing datasets, Indexing and Identifiers
  • Data curation and Version control
  • Ontologies
  • Metadata standards
  • Provenance
  • Section 2: Data Representation Overview
  • Databases and data warehouses, Data: structures, types, integrations
  • Social networking data
  • Data wrangling, normalization, preprocessing
  • Exploratory Data Analysis
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Section 3: Computing Overview
  • Workflows/pipelines
  • Programming and software engineering; API; optimization
  • Cloud, Parallel, Distributed Computing, and High Performance Computing
  • Commons: lessons learned, current state
  • Section 4: Data Modeling and Inference Overview
  • Smoothing, Unsupervised Learning/Clustering/Density Estimation
  • Supervised Learning/prediction/Machine Learning, dimensionality reduction
  • Algorithms and their Optimization
  • Multiple hypothesis testing, False Discovery Rate
  • Data issues: Bias, Confounding, and Missing data
  • Causal inference
  • Data Visualization tools and communication
  • Modeling Synthesis
  • Section 5: Additional topics
  • Open science
  • Data sharing (including social obstacles)
  • Ethical Issues
  • Extra considerations/limitations for clinical data
  • reproducibility
  • SUMMARY and NIH context
  • Section 6: Specific examples

 

Please feel free to share with your students, staff and colleagues. Tune in for the first lecture on September 9th!

World Humanitarian Day

Today, August 19, 2016, we honor humanitarian aid workers who stand on the front lines and deliver assistance to those in need.

Are you a humanitarian aid worker? Check out the Center for Disease Control (CDC) section on traveler’s health, with a special page dedicated to humanitarian aid workers. Here you will find a vast collection of resources for travelers of all types, including health notices, updates on the latest vaccines, and mobile apps to aid in your international journeys.

For resources on disaster relief, visit the Department of Health and Human Services’ Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC). Here you will find information on all types of disasters, emergency response tools, and training courses available through the National Library of Medicine (NLM).

For more information on World Humanitarian Day, visit:

https://worldhumanitarianday.org/

http://www.unocha.org/whd2016

http://www.un.org/en/events/humanitarianday/index.shtml

Tips for Retaining and Caring for Staff after a Disaster

When disasters strike, the ripple effects are significant. Survivors may be injured or displaced, or may have loved ones in similar situations. Healthcare providers and staff who maintain facility operations are no exception, and yet they are a critical component of the response phase and expected to care not only for their own loved ones, but community members and the facility, too.  Leadership plays a vital role in ensuring staff feel cared for and safe. The ASPR Technical Resources, Assistance Center, and Information Exchange (ASPR TRACIE) just released Tips for Retaining and Caring for Staff after a Disaster, providing general promising practices—categorized by immediate and short-term needs—for facility executives to consider when trying to retain and care for staff after a disaster.

If you have any questions or feedback, please contact ASPR TRACIE.

Research Data Management Education Modules

On behalf of Kevin Reed and Alisa Surkis, NYU School of Medicine:

We would like to request your participation in piloting research data management education materials for medical librarians. We are currently funded by a grant from the Big Data to Knowledge Initiative at NIH to develop a curriculum for medical librarians to facilitate their teaching research data management at their own institutions. There are two components to the training materials:

Part 1: Seven online modules (approximately three hours of content) designed to teach medical librarians about the practice and culture of research and best practices in research data management.

Part 2: A teaching toolkit including slides, scripts, and evaluation materials to teach an in-person introductory research data management class for researchers at your institution.

We are currently seeking participants to pilot part 1. Following that, we will seek out a subset of participants with whom to pilot part 2, which will involve structured observations of classes taught by the librarians at their institutions. All participants in piloting part 1 will be given access to the materials in part 2, regardless of whether or not they are part of the piloting of those materials.

My colleague, Alisa Surkis, and I have been teaching research data management to our fellow medical librarians at the past three MLA annual meetings, based on our own experiences in providing research data management services at NYU School of Medicine. We hope that the materials we have created here will make the core elements of that class more broadly available to facilitate the teaching of research data management at medical libraries across the United States.

If you intend to take these modules, please contact Kevin Read at kevin.read@med.nyu.edu or Alisa Surkis at alisa.surkis@med.nyu.edu to confirm your participation. You do not need to await a reply from us to begin taking the modules.  We are also available to answer your questions at any time.

U-VDC Technical Grant Writing Workshops

University Vision, Design and Capacity (U-VDC) Technical Grant Writing Workshops

September 13-14
Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College
2101 14th Street, Room 214
Cloquet, MN

Details and Registration

The University Vision, Design and Capacity (U-VDC) technical grant writing workshops, part of the HETAP initiative, provide university and health professionals with strategies to make grant proposals more competitive and get funded.

Learn to write winning grants and build sustainable partnerships to improve minority health!

This hands-on, two-day workshop is for junior faculty, staff and college/university health professionals who are interested in community-based participatory research; who are committed to working with underserved populations; and who want to build their institution’s capacity to compete and receive competitive grant awards.

What is HETAP?

The Higher Education Technical Assistance Project (HETAP) targets institutions of higher education, including minority serving institutions, focusing on sharing resource development strategies, regional health data and information, emerging health disparities research, community engagement, and opportunities for networking.

August Boost Box

Easy-to-Read Health Materials: Are They Really?

When: August 31, 2016  12:00pm  (Noon) ET

Miraida Morales, Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Rutgers University, Library and Information Science, will discuss the challenges of using easy-to-read health materials, such as their high reading level, lack of control or standardization of readability, and problems with readability formulas. In this session she will offer practical solutions for what librarians and other professionals can do to minimize these issues for our communities. Miraida will also share her research findings on how adult beginning and developing readers evaluate health information materials.

This session is eligible for 1 MLA CE by attending the online session and completing the evaluation.

Please register: https://nnlm.gov/mar/training/register.html%20?schedule_id=4043