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The blog of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Evaluation Office

Archive for the ‘News’ Category

NEO Announcement! Home Grown Tools and Resources

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

Red Toolbox with ToolsSince NEO (formerly OERC) was formed, we’ve created a lot of material – four evaluation guides, a 4-step guide to creating an evaluation plan, hosted in-person classes and webinars, and of course, written in this very blog! All of the guides, classes, and blogs come with a lot of materials, including tip sheets, example plans, and resource lists. In order to get to all of these resources though, you had to go through each section of the website and search for them, or attend one of our in person classes. That all changed today.

Starting now, NEO will be posting its own tip sheets, evaluation examples, and more of our favorite links on the Tools and Resources page. Our first addition is our brand new tip sheet, “Maximizing Response Rate to Questionnaires,” which can be found under the Data Collection tab. We also provided links to some of our blog posts in each tab, making them easier to find. Look for more additions to the Tools and Resources page in upcoming months.

Do you have a suggestion for a tip sheet? Comment below – you might see it in the future!

Make 2017 the “Yes-and” Year for Evaluation

Friday, January 6th, 2017

20117 (year) with fireworks and "Always Say Yes" written underneath

PSA: New Year’s resolutions are passé.

It’s out with dreary self-betterment goals involving celery and punishing exercise. Instead, the trendiest way to mark the New Year is to pick an inspirational word and make it your annual North Star for self-improvement.  In that spirit, I want to propose a word of the year for the NEO Shop Talk community.

That word is “Yes and.”

Now, some of you are wondering how I passed kindergarten with such poor counting skills. However, If you or anyone you know has taken training in Improv theatre, you know “Yes and” is a word, or, more specifically, a verb.

Improv is a type of theatre in which a team of actors make up scenes on the spot, usually from audience suggestions.  Because performances are unscripted, improv actors train rather than rehearse. Training is built around commonly accepted “rules,” and, arguably, the best known rule of Improv is “Always say Yes and…”   That means that you accept any scene idea your teammate presents and add something to make that idea better. Once novice improvisers experience the upbeat emotional effect of this rule, they soon find themselves “yes-anding” in other parts of their lives. Some even preach about it to others (ahem).  Notice, by the way, I added a hyphen so we can all feel better about “yes-and” as the WORD of the year.

If you can “yes-and” evaluation requirements and responsibilities, it will put you on the road to mastering this rule. Let’s face it, the thought of evaluation does not generate an abundance of enthusiasm. Usually we do evaluation because someone else expects or requires us to do it: upper administration; accreditation boards; funding agencies. We only do evaluation when forced because it’s a lot of work. I compare evaluation to physical exercise. In theory, we know it’s good for us. In practice, we don’t have time for it. “Yes-anding” evaluation may not make you do more evaluation than you’re required to do.  It might, however, make your evaluation responsibilities more enjoyable or, at least, more meaningful to you personally.

For example, if you have to write a proposal for external funding, you often have to pull together assessment information to build a case for your proposed program. Does that mean you have to locate and synthesize lots of data from lots of sources? Yes, and you get to demonstrate all of the great things your library or organization has to offer. You also get to point out areas where you could provide even more awesome services if the funding agency gave you funding to meet your resource needs. (Here’s a NEO Shop Talk blog post on how to use SWOT analysis to synthesize needs assessment data.)

If your proposal includes outreach into a new community, you probably have to collect information from that community.   Do you have to find and conduct key informant interviews with representatives of the community?   Yes, and you also get to initiate relationships with influential community opinion leaders. Listening is a powerful way to build trust and rapport. If you have the opportunity to implement your program, these key informants will be powerful allies when you want to reach out to the broader community. (If you want some tips for finding key informants, check out this blog post.)

You can “yes-and” internally mandated evaluation as well. Your library or organization may require you to track data on an ongoing basis or to submit regular reports. To do this well, do you have to document your daily work, such as keep track of details surrounding reference services, workshop attendance, or facility usage? Yes and, you also get to create a database of motivational information to inspire you and fellow co-workers working on the same objectives and goals. Compile that information monthly or quarterly, and pass it around at staff meetingd.  Celebrate what you’re accomplishing. Figure out where effort is lagging and commit to bolstering activities in that area. Then celebrate your team’s astute use of data for making good program decisions. Yes, and, at reporting time, be sure you present your data so that your upper-level stakeholders notices your hard work.

Maybe your department or office has to set and assess annual objectives or outcomes. Do you have to collect and report data to show program results? Yes, and you also get to demonstrate your value to the organization. Just be sure you don’t hide your candle deep in some organizational online reporting system.  Annual reports are seldom page-turners. Find more compelling ways to communicate your success and contributions to upper administrators and influential users. For some ideas, you might want to check out some of NEO Shop Talk posts on reporting and data visualization.

Another rule of Improv is “There are no mistakes, only opportunities.”  Let’s paraphrase that to “there are no evaluation requirements, only opportunities.”  Here’s to making 2017 the year of “yes-anding” evaluation.

As a post-script, I want to share a NEO Shop Talk success with our readers. Did we post weekly blog entries in 2016? Yes, and you showed up more than ever. NEO Shop Talk visits increased 71% in 2016. Each month, we averaged 259 more visits compared to the same month in the previous year.  Our peak month was February, with 892 visits! Thank you, readers. Please come back and bring your friends!

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2016 Annual NEO Shop Talk Round-up

Friday, December 30th, 2016

Top 10 List

Like everyone else, we have an end-of-the-year list.  Here’s our top ten list of the posts we wrote this year, based on number of views:

10. Developing Program Outcomes Using the Kirkpatrick Model – with Vampires

9.  Inspirational Annual Reporting with Appreciative Inquiry

8.  What is a Need?

7.  Designing Surveys: Does the Order of Response Options Matter?

6.  Simply Elegant Evaluation: GMR’s Pilot Assessment of a Chapter Exhibit

5.  A Chart Chooser for Qualitative Data!

4.  W.A.I.T. for Qualitative Interviews

3.  The Zen Trend in Data Visualization

2.  How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Logic Models (The Chili Lesson)

1.  Logic Model for a Birthday Party

We put a lot of links to interesting things in our blog posts.  Here are the Top Ten websites that people went to from our blog:

10. The Kirkpatrick Model

9.  Books by Stephanie Evergreen

8.  Tearless Logic Model article in Global Journal of Community Psychology Practice

7.  AEA 365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

6.  Public Libraries, Project Outcome – Looking Back, Looking Forward

5.  Build a Qualitative Dashboard

4.  Nat King Cole, The Christmas Song

3.  The Histomap by John Sparks

2.  Tools: Tearless Logic Model (how-to summary)

1.  Stephanie Evergreen Qualitative Chart Chooser

The NEO wishes you a happy and fulfilling New Year!!

My Favorite Things 2016 (Spoiler Alert: Includes Cats)

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

Little figurine of Santa standing in snow, holding gifts

During gift-giving season every year, Oprah publishes a list of her favorite things. Well, move over, Oprah, because I also have a list. This is my bag of holiday gifts for our NEO Shop Talk readers.

Art Exhibits

There are two websites with galleries of data visualizations that are really fun to visit. The first,  Information is Beautiful , has wonderful examples of data visualizations, many of which are interactive. My favorites from this site are Who Old Are You?   (put in your birth date to start it) and Common MythConceptions. The other is Tableau Public, Tableau Software Company’s “public commons” for their users to share their work.  My picks are the Endangered Species Safari  and the data visualization of the Simpsons Vizapedia.  And, in case  you’re wondering what happened to your favorite Crayola crayon colors, you can find out here.

Movies

Nancy Duarte’s The Secret Structure of Great Talks is my favorite TEDtalk. Duarte describes the simple messaging structure underlying inspirational speeches. Once you grasp this structure, you will know how to present evaluations findings to advocate for stakeholder support. I love the information in this talk, but that’s not why I listen to it over and over again.  It’s because Duarte says “you have the power to change the world” and, by the end of the talk, I believe her.

Dot plot for a fictional workshop data, titled Participant Self Assessment of their Holiday Skills before and after our holiday survival workshop. Pre/post self-report ratings for four items: Baking without a sugar overdose (pre=3; post-5); Making small talk at the office party (pre=1; post=3); Getting gifts through airport security (pre=2; post-5); Managing road rage in mall parking lots (pre=2; post-4)

I also am a fan of two videos from the Denver Museum of Natural History, which demonstrate how museum user metrics can be surprisingly entertaining. What Do Jelly Beans Have To Do With The Museum? shows demographics with colorful candy and Audience Insights On Parking at the Museum  talks amusingly about a common challenge of urban life.

Crafts

If you want to try your hand at creating snappier charts and graphs, you need to spend some time at Stephanie Evergreen’s blog. For example, she gives you step-by-step instructions on making lollipop charts, dot plots , and overlapping bar charts. Stephanie works exclusively in Excel, so there’s no need to purchase or learn new software. You also might want to learn a few new Excel graphing tricks at Ann Emery’s blog.  For instance, she describes how to label the lines in your graphs or adjust bar chart spacing.

Site Seeing

How about a virtual tour to the UK? I still marvel at the innovative Visualizing Mill Road  project. Researchers collected community data, then shared their findings in street art. This is the only project I know of featuring charts in sidewalk chalk. The web site talks about community members’ reactions to the project, which is also pretty fascinating.

Humor

I left the best for last. This is a gift for our most sophisticated readers, recommended by none other than Paul Gargani, president of the American Evaluation Association. It is a web site for the true connoisseurs of online evaluation resources.  I present to you the Twitter feed for  Eval Cat.  Even the  NEO Shop Talk cats begrudgingly admire it, although no one has invited them to post.

 

Pictures of the four NEO Eval Cats

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s wishing you an enjoyable holiday.

A Chart Chooser for Qualitative Data!

Friday, November 18th, 2016

Core Values Word Cloud Concept

When people talk about data visualization, they are usually talking about quantitative data. In a previous post, we explained that data visualizations help people perform three primary functions: exploring, making sense of, and communicating data.  How can we report qualitative data in a way that performs those same functions?

We just got some exciting news from the EvergreenData blog that they have developed a Qualitative Chart Chooser. Seriously–it’s a work of art. Actually two works of art because they have two different chart chooser drafts to choose from.

The way it works is this: you think about the story you want to tell with your data, maybe about how something improved over time because of your awesome project. Then using the chart chooser, you look at the “show change over time” category, and then you could select a timeline, before-and-after “change photos,” or a histomap (what’s a histomap?  Take a look at this one).

This chart chooser is a very cool tool. But I wouldn’t wait until it was time to report findings to use it. One thing that we at the NEO suggest is that when you are first planning your project, you should think about the story or stories you want to tell at the end of your project. Maybe when you’re thinking about the story you want to tell, you could look at all these different qualitative charts in the chart chooser.  Which ones would you like to use? Do you want to tell the story of how your program aligns with the goals of your institution (you could try indicator dots)? Or maybe you want to show how the different parts of your project work together as a whole (a dendrogram might work). By looking at these options before you design your evaluation plan, you can be sure that you are gathering the right data from the beginning. Backing up even further in your planning process, if you are having trouble trying to decide what story or stories you want to tell, this Qualitative Chart Chooser can give you ways to think about that.

Here is some more information on qualitative data visualization and storytelling from NEO Shop Talk:

Qualitative Data Visualization, September 26, 2014

More Qualitative Data Visualization Ideas, December 18, 2014

Telling Good Stories About Good Programs, June 29, 2015

DIY Tool for Program Success Stories, July 2, 2015

 

Participatory Evaluation, NLM Style

Friday, November 11th, 2016

Road Sign with directional arrow and "Get Involved" written on it.

This week, I invite you to stop reading and start doing.

Okay, wait. Don’t go yet.  Let me explain. I am challenging you to be a participant-observer in a very important assessment project being conducted by the National Library of Medicine (NLM).

The NEO is part of the National Library of Medicine’s program (The National Network of Libraries of Medicine) that promotes use of NLM’s extensive body of health information resources.  The NLM is devoted to advancing the progress of medicine and improving the public health through access to health information. Whether you’re a librarian, health care provider, public health worker, patient/consumer, researcher, student, educator, or emergency responder fighting health-threatening disasters, the NLM has high quality, open-access health information for you.

Now the NLM is working on a long-range plan to enhance its service to its broad user population.  It is inviting the public to provide input on its future direction and priorities. Readers, you are a stakeholder in the planning process. Here is your chance to contribute to the vision. Just click here to participate.

And, because you are an evaluation-savvy NLM stakeholder, your participation will allow you to experience a strength-based participatory evaluation method in action.  Participatory evaluation refers to evaluation projects that engage a wide swath of stakeholders. Strength-based evaluation approaches are those that focus on getting stakeholders to identify the best of organizations and suggest ways to build on those strengths. Appreciative Inquiry is one of the most widely recognized strength-based approaches. The NEO blog have posts featuring Appreciative Inquiry projects here and here.

While I have no idea if the NLM’s long-range planning team explicitly used Appreciative Inquiry for developing their Request for Information, their questions definitely embody the spirit of strength-based assessment. I’m not going to post all of the question here because I want readers to go to the RFI to see the questions for themselves. But as a teaser, here’s the first question that appears in each area of inquiry addressed in the feedback form:

 “Identify what you consider an audacious goal in this area – a challenge that may be daunting but would represent a huge leap forward were it to be achieved.  Include any proposals for the steps and elements needed to reach that goal. The most important thing NLM does in this area, from your perspective.”

So be an observer: check out the NLM’s Request for Information.  Notice how they constructed a strength-based participant feedback form.

Then be a participant: take a few minutes to post your vision for the future of NLM.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Logic Models (The Chili Lesson)

Friday, October 28th, 2016

michelle

By Michelle Malizia, Director of Library Services for the Health Sciences, University of Houston

I’ll start with a full disclosure: I am a late convert to logic models. Many years ago, I worked in a department that, for a period of time, became governed by logic models. This experience made me fear… no, hate… logic models.  Several years later, through external workshops and assistance from the NN/LM Evaluation Office, I was introduced to the tremendous value of logic models.

My closest personal analogy relates to my feelings about chili. I grew up eating my mother’s chili, which basically consisted of cans of many different types of beans floating in a type of broth. I hated it. When I was 22 years old, I had no choice but to eat someone else’s chili. This chili had lots of ground beef and spices. It was delicious. Then it occurred to me, my mother’s chili was my only frame of reference for chili. I didn’t dislike chili – I disliked my mother’s chili.

And so it goes with logic models. Once I learned a different way to make and apply them, I became a dedicated user. I now design logic models whenever I plan a new service, activity or initiative.

In 2014, I was hired as the Director of Library Services for the Health Sciences at the University of Houston (UH). In 2017, UH will have its first medical library and my task is to plan the services for the new facility. Of course, I turned to logic models because they provided the framework of not only what I am planning but why I am planning each service and ultimately, how I will evaluate if I achieved the goal.

When I started with my logic models, I was tempted to begin with the activity. I had to remind myself that it is more important to document what I hope to accomplish by that activity (i.e. outcome).  Think about it: Why do librarians teach PubMed classes? Why do librarians want to be embedded in a nursing class? Why do so many libraries provide liaison services? Many of you are probably thinking: “That’s easy, Michelle. We do those things to better serve our customers.” My response is:  How do you know those activities better serve your customers?  How can you prove it to your stakeholders?  That is the reason you should start with your outcomes rather than activities.

For example, my new library will be providing assistance with NIH Public Access Policy compliance. When I developed my logic model, I called upon my inner 3-year old to ask the question best asked by toddlers:  Why.  Because I have a creative side, I use the software Visio (a Microsoft Office software) to create my logic models. It allows me to visually see connections between activities. The chart below shows  a portion of my logic model.

NIH Public Access Policy Assistance Services logic Model One. Activities are conduct workshops and assistance with compliance. Outputs are number of workshops and number of consultations. Short-term outcomes are increase awareness of NIH Public Access Policy and increased knowledge of compliance specifics. Intermediate outcome is compliance and long-term outcome is UH retains and receives NIH grants.

 

As you can see, my long-term outcome for this activity was to ensure that UH retains and receives NIH Grants. If UH researchers don’t comply with the NIH Public Access Policy mandate, their current and future funding is in jeopardy. The intermediate outcome leading to the long-term outcome is increased compliance with the policy. In order to increase compliance, I need to make researchers aware of the policy and how to comply.  That’s when I was able to determine the best methods for me to accomplish those outcomes. For my university environment, the best way to achieve these outcomes is through workshops and consultations.

Now that I knew the “what and the why,” I needed to determine the how.  How would I know if I accomplished my goals? Again, I turned to Visio to visualize how I could assess if I achieved my outcomes.

My final step was to determine my measurable indicators. For example, in the case of workshops, my indicator was “% of workshop attendees who reported being more knowledgeable about how to comply with the policy.”  My target was 85% of attendees. To evaluate this outcome, I would use a pre- and post-test.

 

Evaluation plan for NIH Public Access Policy Assistance Services. Outputs are workshops and consultations, leading to short-term outcomes of increased awareness of NIH Public Access policy and increased knowledge of compliance specifics. The outcomes will be assessed with a pre-post test and follow-up questionnaire. The intermediate outcome is increased compliance, which will be assessed with a survey and/or other follow-up

My overall work with logic models led to a pleasant surprise. Mid-way through my process, UH Libraries adopted a new strategic plan. Strategic plans are usually written in terms of goals. Some of my colleagues tried to feverishly determine where their activities fit into the library’s overall goals. Because I had already determined my outcomes, it was easy to slot my activities into the library’s overall plan.

If you have had a previous bad experience creating logic models, try it again. Ask the NEO for assistance and look at their extremely helpful guides. Like me, you may finally realize that logic models are worth the time and energy. Remember, there are many different types of chili.  Find the one that you like best.

NEO note: The evaluation field has come a long way in discovering new, less painful approaches to creating and using logic models.  If, like Michelle, you had bad experiences years ago with logic models, you might want to give them another chance.  You can learn one approach through the NEO booklet Michelle mentioned, which is  Planning Outcomes-Based Projects (Booklet 3 in our Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach Programs series). For alternative approaches, check out our NEO Shop Talk blog entries  Logic Model for a Birthday Party and An Easier Way to Plan: Tearless Logic Models.

 

Meet the NEO’s New Program Assistant Kalyna Durbak

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Kalyna Durbak

I am pleased to introduce the NEO’s new program assistant, Kalyna Durbak, MLIS, who joined our staff on October 3.  Kalyna will be our go-to person for managing the NEO website, providing technical support with webinars, and helping with the “roll-up-your-sleeves” work involved in carrying out evaluation projects.

Kalyna began working for the UW Health Sciences Library in May 2016. Prior to joining the NEO, Kalyna was the Web Content Assistant on the team that created and promotes the Response & Recovery App in Washington (RRAIN), designed to provide emergency responders with quick access to disaster-management resources. It also provides local information such as weather alerts and traffic reports. Kalyna also provided web content and social media assistance for the Health Evidence Resource for Washington State (HEALWA), a portal that provides affordable online access to clinical information and health education resources. The portal is available to health professionals who are licensed through 23 state organizations. A 2015 evaluation study conducted by HEALWA showed that many health professionals eligible to use the portal are not aware of it.  Kalyna helped promote HEALWA through social media and exhibits.

Kalyna earned her MLIS degree from University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign and a BA in History from University of Illinois at Chicago. She was an intern at the Smithsonian Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections and the Rochester Institute of Technology Archives. A Midwestern native, she recently moved to Seattle with her husband because they were attracted to Seattle’s mix of urban and outdoor opportunities. To introduce herself to our readers, Kalyna agreed to answer a few questions about herself.

What made you want to pursue an MLS?

I always considered myself a “jack of all trades.” At school I did not excel in one subject, but rather did fairly well in most areas of study. I also fell in love with researching, and doing “deep dives” into different subjects. I figured that with an MLS, I could end up working in vastly different environments, help others with research, and pursue my dream of being a lifelong learner.

What made you want to join the NN/LM Evaluation Office?

I recently realized that I needed to strengthen my evaluation skills. Whether I am working or volunteering, I am constantly trying to solve issues concerning outreach and training. For most of my career, I just created solutions without ever thinking “How can I measure my success in solving this issue?” and “Are these solutions working the way I intended?” These questions are key in determining whether the solution is actually solving any problems, or just wasting time and energy.

What experience have you had with evaluation?

My experiences with evaluation come from managing social media accounts. Once I realized I had a whole dashboard of statistics to my disposal, I used them to set optimization goals in terms of posting times and types of content that resonate with my audiences.

What evaluation skills do you particularly hope to develop?

I am very interested in developing my outcome assessment skills. I am usually the big idea person of a group, and enjoy setting lofty goals. In the past, I have measured the success of an initiative based on the number of tasks my group completed for the project. What I want to do going forward is measure success by the initiative’s impact on the intended audience and community.

What other interests do you have?

I am very active in a Ukrainian Scouting Organization called Plast. Through scouting I found my love for the outdoors, and made countless friends all over the United States and around the world. When I’m not working on scouting activities, I find myself crafting. My favorite crafts include quilling, card making, and traditional Ukrainian embroidery.

When I am crafting or commuting to work, I listen to various nerdy podcasts. Some of my favorites include 99% Invisible, LibUX, and Reply All

What is the bravest thing you’ve ever done?

I took a hike with my husband down the Grand Canyon. I didn’t make it that far, because I’m afraid of heights. There was one foot between my body and a drop into the canyon, and that was not where I wanted to be. I had to turn back partway down. My husband said, “I love you. Do you mind if I keep going?”  So I had to walk back up the trail alone. Looking back, I’m glad I went through it.  Once I climbed up, I felt so proud of myself.

What’s in a Name? Convey Your Chart’s Meaning with a Great Title

Friday, October 7th, 2016

Some of you may be working on conference posters and paper presentations for Fall conferences.  And some of those will probably include charts to demonstrate data representing a lot of hard work on your part.  In most cases you have minutes to use that chart to get your audience to understand the data.

Stephanie Evergreen has great advice for displaying chart data.  She literally wrote the books on it: Presenting Data Effectively and Effective Data Visualization.  Her recent blog post is about one of the simplest and most powerful changes you can make to effectively present your chart data: “Strong Titles Are The Biggest Bang for Your Buck.

What many of us do is present the data with a generic title, like “Attendance rates.” Then the viewer has to spend time working through the data and you hope that they see what you wanted them to.  What Stephanie Evergreen proposes (backed by persuasive research) is to give your charts a clear title that explains what the data shows. Your poster or paper is almost certainly making a point.  Determine how your chart supports the point of your presentation and state that in the title.  Here are some reasons why:

  • It respects your viewers’ time
  • It forces you to be clear about the point you want your data to make
  • It makes the data more memorable

Stephanie Evergreen’s post has some great examples of how a good title can really improve the impact of the chart.  In addition, here is an example from the NEO webinar Make Your Point: Good Design for Data Visualization.

Looking at this original chart, you might notice that in each activity the follow-up showed an increase over the baseline.  If you, the viewer, didn’t have a lot of time, that might be all you noticed.

Chart with title: Comparison of emergency preparedness activities from baseline to follow-up

With a simple change of title , you can see that the author of this presentation is highlighting the increased number of continuity of services plans.  This is designed to enhance the point of the presentation, and not waste the viewers’ time. Also, note that the title is left justified instead of centered.  Because the title is a full sentence, a left-justified format is easier to read.

Chart with title: The biggest improvement in emergency preparedness from baseline to follow-up was the number of network member organizations reporting that they had or were working on a service continuity plan.

So, while Shakespeare might have been correct when he wrote “What’s in a name? that which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet,” what if the presenter was trying to show the fortitude of Texas antique roses to survive in harsh weather conditions, and the viewer only noticed how sweet the rose smelled?  Maybe the heading “A Rose” sometimes isn’t enough information.

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Update Your Evaluation Toolbox: Two Great Conferences

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

It’s the fall, also known as the beginning of conference season. It’s a very exciting time if you like evaluation/assessment.  If you want to improve your evaluation skills, two great conferences are coming up, back to back.  Take a look at some of these highlights and pick one to go to!

Oct. 24-29, 2016 Evaluation 2016, Atlanta GA

Eavlaution 2016 October 24-29, Atlanta, GA

This is the annual conference of the American Evaluation Association, an international organization with over 7000 members, and interest groups that cover topics like Assessment in Higher Education; Collaborative, Participatory & Empowerment Evaluation; and Data Visualization and Reporting.  The theme of this year’s conference is Evaluation + Design.

The conference has 40 workshops and 850 sessions.  Here are some example programs:

  • From crap to oh snap: Using DIY templates to (easily) improve information design across an organization
  • Developing Evaluation Tools to Measure MOOC Learner Outcomes in Higher Education
  • Evaluation Design for Innovation/Pilot Projects

There’s still time for Early Bird Registration (ends October 3)!

Oct. 31-November 2, 2016 Library Assessment Conference, Arlington VA

Library Assessment Conference 2016

This conference only happens every other year and is co-sponsored by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the University of Washington (UW) Libraries (disclosure – the NEO is part of the UW Libraries–something we’re quite proud of).   The theme for this conference is Building Effective, Sustainable, Practical Assessment.

This conference is bookended by workshops like Getting the Message Out: Creating a Multi-Directional Approach to Communicating Assessment and Learning Analytics, Academic Libraries, and Institutional Context: Getting Started, Gaining Traction, Going Forward.

Scholarly papers and posters with titles like “How Well Do We Collaborate? Using Social Network Analysis (SNA) to Evaluate Engagement in Assessment Program” and “Consulting Detectives: How One Library Deduced the Effectiveness of Its Consultation Area & Services” are organized around a variety of topics, such as Organizational Issues; Ithaka S+R; and Analytics/Value.

 

This is an exciting time to be in the assessment and evaluation business.  Take this amazing opportunity to go to one of these conferences.

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Last updated on Monday, June 27, 2016

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under Contract No. UG4LM012343 with the University of Washington.