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The blog of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Evaluation Office

Archive for December, 2015

Fun for Data Lovers: Two Interactive Data Visualizations

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015

‘Tis the season of gift-giving and who doesn’t love getting toys during the holidays? So we want to give our readers links to two fun data visualizations to play with over the holidays. Both were designed by David McCandless at Information is BeautifulSnake Oil Superfoods summarizes the evidence (or lack thereof) for health claims about foods popularly believed to have healing properties. Snake Oil Supplements gives the same scrutiny to dietary supplements.

You can readily check the science behind the infographics. Both link to abstracts of scientific studies indexed in reputable sources such as PubMed or Cochran Library. The pretty-colored bubbles and the filters give you an enjoyable way to check some of those food-related miracles being proclaimed in popular magazines and your Facebook feed.

Meanwhile,  Happy Holidays to you and yours from OERC bloggers Cindy Olney and Karen Vargas.

Christmas 2015
Cindy (left) and Karen at the American Evaluation Association’s 2015 Conference

 

 

 

Dashboards for Your Library? Here Are Some Examples

Friday, December 18th, 2015

illustration of different business graphs on white backgroundLast week’s blog post was about using Excel to make data dashboards. As Cindy pointed out a dashboard is “a reporting format that allows stakeholders to view and interact with program or organizational data, exploring their own questions and interests.”

What can that mean for your library? What does a library data dashboard look like?

In the OERC Tools and Resources for Evaluation, we have a Libguide for Reporting and Visualizing, which includes a section on data dashboards.  In it are some examples of libraries using data dashboards.  In their dashboards, libraries are sharing data on some of the following things:

  • How much time is spent helping students and faculty with research
  • What databases are used most often
  • How e-books are changing the library picture
  • What librarians have been learning at their professional development conferences
  • What is the use of study rooms over time
  • What month is the busiest for library instruction
  • What department does the most inter-library loan

Can you create a dashboard to tell a story? While libraries can keep (and post) statistics on all kinds of things, consider who the dashboard is for, and what story you want to tell them about your library.  Maybe it’s the story of how the library is using its resources wisely.  Or maybe it’s the story of why the library decided it needed more study rooms.  Or the story of whether or not the library should eliminate it’s book collection and increase e-books and databases.

Consider what data you want to share and what people are interesting in knowing.  Happy dashboarding!

Excel Dashboards at Chandoo.org

Friday, December 11th, 2015

Chandoo.org is a website that excels at Excel.  More specifically, it provides an extensive collection of resources to help the rest of us use Excel effectively.  There’s something for everyone at this website, whether you’re a basic or advanced user. Today, however. I want to specifically talk about Chandoo.org’s resources on building data dashboards with Excel.

Data dashboards are THE cool new data tools. A dashboard is a reporting format that allows stakeholders to view and interact with program or organizational data, exploring their own questions and interests. When the OERC offered a basic data dashboard webinar several years ago, we hit our class limit within hours of opening registration. If you are unfamiliar with data dashboards, here are slides from a presentation by Buhler, Lewellen, and Murphy that describe and provide samples of data dashboards. .

Tableau seems to have grabbed the limelight as the go-to software for data dashboard development. Yet it may not be accessible to many of our blog readers.  It’s expensive and, unless you are a data analyst savant, Tableau may require a fair amount of training.

The good news is that Excel software is a perfectly fine tool for creating data dashboards. Some of the best known data visualization folks in the American Evaluation Association (AEA) are primarily Excel users. Stephanie Evergreen of Evergreen Data  and Ann Emery write popular blogs about data visualizations built from Excel. At the AEA’s annual conference in November, I attended a presentation by Miranda Lee of EvaluATE on creating dashboards with Excel.  She has some how-to dashboarding videos in the works that will be available to the public in the near future. (We’ll let our blog readers know when they become available.)

Hand of a business man checking data on a handheld device

There are free resources all over the Internet if you are good at do-it-yourself training.  However, for a modest fee, Chandoo.org offers a more systematic class on how to design a data dashboard with Excel. Depending on how many resources you want to take away from the class, the cost is between $97 (online viewing only) and $247 (downloads and extra modules). I have not taken the class yet, but I have heard positive feedback about Chandoo.org’s other courses and have plans to take this class in the near future.

If you are an Excel user but don’t see dashboard-building in your future, you still may find a wealth of useful tips and resources about Excel at Chandoo.org. My favorite is this list of 100+ Excel tips. I attended several data dashboard sessions at the AEA conference last month. The word on the street is that Microsoft is rising to the challenge to develop its data visualization capabilities.  Apparently, each new release is better than the last.  It may be getting easier to work dashboard magic with Excel.

Measuring What Matters in Your Social Media Strategy

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

Thumbs up symbols with text "get more likes"

We’re all trying to find ways to improve evaluation of our social media efforts. It’s fun to count the number of retweets, and the number of ‘likes’ warms our hearts.  But there’s a nagging concern to evaluators – are these numbers meaningful?

Your intrepid OERC Team, Cindy and Karen, attended a program at the American Evaluation Association conference in Chicago called “Do Likes Save Lives? Measuring What Really Matters in Social Media and Digital Advocacy Efforts,” presented by Lisa Hilt and Rebecca Perlmutter of Oxfam.  The purpose of their presentation was to build knowledge and skills in planning and measuring social media strategies, setting digital objectives, selecting meaningful indicators and choosing the right tools and approaches for analyzing social media data.

What was interesting about this presentation is that the presenters did not want to rely solely on what they called “vanity metrics,” for example the number of “impressions” or “likes.”  Alone these metrics show very little actual engagement with the information.  Instead they chose to focus on specific social media objectives based on their overall digital strategy.

Develop a digital strategy

  • Connect the overall digital strategy to campaign objectives: (for example: To influence a concrete change in policy, or to change the debate on a particular issue.)

Develop social media objectives

  • You want people to be exposed to your message
  • Then you want people to engage with it somehow (for example, sharing your message) or make them work with it somehow (for example: sign an online petition after reading it).

Collect specific information based on objectives

  • Collect data about social media engagement supporting your objectives that can be measured (for example “the Oxfam Twitter campaign drove 15% of the readers to signing its petition” vs. “we got 1500 likes”)

The presenters suggested some types of more meaningful metrics:

  • On Twitter you can look at the number of profiles who take the action you want them to take, and then the number of tweets or retweets about your topic.
  • For Facebook, the number of likes, shares and comments mean that your audience was definitely exposed to your message.
  • Changes in the rate of likes or follows (for example if you normally get 5 new followers to your fan page a week, but due to a particular campaign strategy, you suddenly started getting 50 new followers a week)
  • Number of “influential” supporters (for example, being retweeted by Karen Vargas is not the same as being retweeted by Wil Wheaton).
  • Qualitative analysis: Consider analyzing comments on Facebook posts, or conversation around a hashtag in Twitter.

Overall, your goal is to have a plan for how you would like to see people interact with your messages in relation to your overall organizational and digital strategies, and find metrics to see if your plan worked.

 

Last updated on Monday, June 27, 2016

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under Contract No. UG4LM012343 with the University of Washington.