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NEO Shop Talk

The blog of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Evaluation Office

Archive for January, 2015

52 Weeks of Better Evaluation

Friday, January 30th, 2015

BetterEvaluation.org is an international collaboration that encourages sharing of evaluation methods, approaches and processes for improvement. BetterEvaluation offers yearly blog themes for their staff and guest writers to focus on, and have wrapped up the highlights of their ’52 Weeks of BetterEvaluation’ 2014 theme in a post at http://betterevaluation.org/node/4682 For 2015 they are featuring ’12 Months of BetterEvaluation’ with multiple posts during a month, starting with impact evaluation in January.

A ‘top 5’ selection from the ‘52 Weeks of BetterEvaluation‘ post that is likely to be of interest to National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) members includes

  1. Top ten developments in qualitative evaluation over the past decade (link to part 1, part 2)
  2. Fitting reporting methods to evaluation findings and audiences (link)
  3. Infographics, including step by step instructions in piktochart (link)
  4. Innovation in evaluation (link)
  5. Presenting data effectively (link)

Freebie Friday: Measuring Success Toolkit

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

Measurement and Evaluation Staircase

Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) is a form of assessment used to help improve the performance and achievement of program results and often used by both non-government organizations (NGOs) and government agencies. The staircase diagram above describes six questions that M&E can help answer through program planning, monitoring, and evaluation. More information clarifying the difference between monitoring and evaluation as well as guidance for each of the six questions is available at this link.

While not specific to health information outreach programs, the Measuring Success Toolkit at  https://www.urbanreproductivehealth.org/toolkits/measuring-success from the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative is about health program planning, monitoring and evaluation. The toolkit provides helpful resources from the initiative’s multi-country perspective of working with the urban poor and the significant health disparities they face that may be helpful to consult with your health information outreach partners to underserved communities.  It includes subject-specific M&E resources such as maternal & child health and HIV/AIDs, and the resources within the toolkit are selected by M&E experts and reviewed quarterly following established criteria to identify important resources from diverse perspectives that include accurate, up to date information.

Focused Outreach Vermont (from NN/LM NER)

Friday, January 16th, 2015

If you are planning or currently conducting an outreach project, you might want to take a look at the Focused Outreach Vermont article in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region (NN/LM NER) newsletter (posted January 13, 2015). NN/LM NER’s Focused Outreach Project uses carefully planned outreach activities and strong community-based collaboration to connect underserved communities with NLM resources and services. The Ner’eastah article, which is an abstract of a full report, highlights outreach results through a succinct description of evaluation findings.

I particularly applaud NN/LM NER’s reporting method. They provide a quick overview, featuring the results of their efforts, with easy access to full details for those who want it. The full report describes the project’s community assessment process and findings. You also get a more thorough description of documented outcomes, laid out in a highly readable format. A nice added feature is the infographic in the beginning of the report.

This is a great example of how to use evaluation to publicize and advocate for successful programs!

nnlm ner

We would like to report more projects that demonstrate effective use of evaluation methods. If you have an example to share, send it to Cindy Olney at olneyc@uw.edu.

Freebie Friday: Mobile Data Solutions Course

Friday, January 9th, 2015

Mobile Course Screenshot

Are you curious about the use of smart phones, tablets, or other mobile data resources to collect data for your assessment project, but are seeking more information on how to determine if this is the right approach for your project or program and how to process the data you collect using this method?

Check out http://techchange.org/media/mobile-data-solutions/, which was created as part of the Mobile Solutions Technical Assistance and Research (mSTAR) project, with expertise provided by U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Digital Development Lab and designed by TechChange.

The primary goal of this freely available and accessible online course (free registration is required to access it) is to learn more about mobile tools, processes, and strategies for data collection in order to use mobile devices (referred to as mobile data solutions) to their full potential in doing so. The course will take about 2 hours to complete and can be done at your own pace over time. Your progress in the course is saved so you’ll be taken to the point where you stopped to continue learning the next time you access it.

The learning objectives of the course are

  • Describe examples of mobile data solutions from collection through visualization
  • Articulate the benefit of using these solutions
  • Analyze the challenges and limitations associated with mobile data solutions
  • Assess whether or not particular mobile data solutions are appropriate for a project, program or problem
  • Outline how to design a project or activity to include mobile data solutions
  • Explain the steps involved in implementing mobile data solutions
  • Summarize how to analyze, visualize, and share mobile data

 

Evaluation “Coffee Breaks” from the CDC

Friday, January 2nd, 2015

Want to build your repertoire of evaluation skills?  Check out this library of evaluation-related podcasts and webinars from the CDC’s Division of Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention.  These are archived documents from 20-minute presentations about evaluation. The usual basic topics are represented, such as “Making Logic Models Work for You”  and “How Do I Develop a Survey?” But a number of the presentations cover topics that are not standard fare. Here are just a few titles that caught my eye:

Most presentations consist of PDFs of PowerPoint slides and talking points, but there are a few podcasts as well.  All presentations seem to be bird’s-eye overviews, but the final slides offer transcripts of Q&A discussion and a list of resources for more in-depth exploration of the topic.  It’s a great way to check out a new evaluation interest!

coffee

Last updated on Monday, June 27, 2016

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under Contract No. UG4LM012343 with the University of Washington.