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NEO Shop Talk

The blog of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Evaluation Office

Archive for December, 2014

Say No to Spaghetti: Effective Data Graphs

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Line graph with 5 multicolor lines jumbled together

The illustration above is from Stephanie Evergreen‘s excellent blog post that caution is needed with the use of line graphs in a chart to show change over time for multiple organizations so you don’t end up with a brightly colored bowl of spaghetti. The solution to passing on this pasta effect? Creating small multiple graphs, such as by each region in this example, which are done one at a time using the same scale as the original graph then stitched together with alignment tools including a ruler and Align > Align Top commands in your graphing software. Be sure to see the end result and step by step guidance on how to create these at http://stephanieevergreen.com/declutter-dataviz-with-small-multiples/

Showing change over time as a line graph instead of a bar graph is one of the quantitative data focus areas in our Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) webinar Data Burger: A ‘Good’ Questionnaire Response Rate Plus Basic Quantitative Analysis. You can listen to a recording of the Data Burger presentation for the Mid Atlantic Region at https://webmeeting.nih.gov/p2mn6k7tkv6/, and please contact us if you’d like to hear more about this or one of our other webinars.

More Qualitative Data Visualization Ideas

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

In September, we blogged about a way to create qualitative data visualizations by chunking a long narrative into paragraphs with descriptive illustrations.

Ann Emery has shown six additional ways to create qualitative data visualization: 1) Strategic world cloud use (one word or before/after comparisons), 2) Quantitative + Qualitative combined (a graph of percentages and a quote from an open-ended text comment) 3) Photos alongside participant responses (only appropriate for non-anonymized data) 4) Icon images beside text narratives 5) Diagrams explaining processes or concepts (the illustration of a health worker’s protective gear from Ebola in the Washington Post is a great example) and 6) Graphic timelines. See these examples and overviews on how to make your own at  http://annkemery.com/qual-dataviz/

Do you need more information about reporting and visualizing your data? We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have more resources available for you from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of our Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide and welcome your suggestions for additional resources to include and your comments.

Practical and Ethical Guidelines for Conducting Photovoice Studies

Friday, December 12th, 2014

If you think you might want to do a photovoice evaluation study, then you definitely should consult Practical Guidance and Ethical Considerations for Studies Using Photo-Elicitation Interviews by Bugos et al.  The authors reviewed articles describing research projects that employed photovoice and photo-elicitation.  Then, they skillfully synthesized the information into practical and ethical guidelines for doing this type of work.

Photo-elicitation refers specifically to the interviewing methods used to get participants to talk about their photographs and videos. The key contribution of this article is its focus on how to interviewing. Effective interviewing technique is essential because the photographs are meaningless unless you understand the participants’ stories behind them. The practical guidelines help you elicit usable, trustworthy story data after the photographs have been taken.

While interviewing is the main focus of the article, you will find some advice on the photo collection phase as well. This article includes guidance on how to train your participants to protect their own safety and the dignity of their subjects when taking photographs. All of the research projects reviewed for this article received institutional review board approval. If you follow their guidelines, you can have confidence that you are protecting the safety, privacy and confidentiality of all involved.

Here is the full citation for this very pragmatic article:

Bugos E, Frasso R, FitzGerald E, True G, Adachi-Mejia AM, Cannuscio C. Practical Guidance and Ethical Considerations for Studies Using Photo- Elicitation Interviews. Prev Chronic Dis 2014;11:140216. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5888/pcd11.140216

 

Tablet PC

Freebie Friday: Rural Health Needs Assessment and Program Evaluation

Friday, December 5th, 2014

Rural and medically underserved areas often have challenges including both increased health disparities and population health issues combined with limited resources and healthcare providers to help meet these challenges. The use of appropriate program evaluation measures can help to assess what actually works for rural health settings since many evidence-based strategies are based on urban and non-rural populations.

The Rural Assistance Center (raconline.org) has recently issued a freely available online guide at  http://www.raconline.org/topics/rural-health-research-assessment-evaluation The guide is intended to help an organization

  • Identifies the similarities and differences among rural health research, assessment, and evaluation
  • Discusses common methods, such as surveys and focus groups
  • Provides contacts within the field of rural health research
  • Addresses the importance of community-based participatory research to rural communities
  • Looks at the community health needs assessment (CHNA) requirements for non-profit hospitals and public health
  • Examines the importance of building the evidence-base so interventions conducted in rural areas have the maximum possible impact

Thanks to National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) Network member (what does that mean?) Gail Kouame from HEALWA for sharing this great resource with us at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC)! Do you have an evaluation-related resource to share? We would be happy to consider featuring it in our blog or possible inclusion in our Tools and Resources guide at guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools.

Last updated on Monday, June 27, 2016

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under Contract No. UG4LM012343 with the University of Washington.